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Auteur Bouchoucha, M.; Pecheyran, C.; Gonzalez, J.L.; Lenfant, P.; Darnaude, A.M.
Titre Otolith fingerprints as natural tags to identify juvenile fish life in ports Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci.
Volume 212 Numéro Pages 210-218
Mots-Clés coastal habitats; Coastal areas; Contamination; elemental fingerprints; Fish; genus diplodus; la-icpms; nursery habitats; Nursery habitats; situ speciation measurements; sparid fishes; stable-isotopes; thin-films dgt; water chemistry; western mediterranean sea
Résumé The construction of ports has caused substantial habitat destruction in coastal areas previously used as nursery grounds by many fish species, with consequences to fish stocks. These artificial coastal areas might provide alternative nursery habitats for several species for juvenile fish abundances and growth in ports, although their contribution to adult stocks had never been estimated. The variability of otolith composition in the juveniles of two Diplodus species was investigated in three contrasting port areas and two adjacent coastal juvenile habitats of the Bay of Toulon (northwestern Mediterranean) in order to determine the possible use of otolith fingerprints as natural tags for the identification of juvenile fishes in ports. The global accuracy of discrimination between ports and coastal areas was very high (94%) irrespective of species, suggesting that otolith fingerprints can be used with confidence to retrospectively identify past residency in the ports of this bay. However, Ba was systematically the most discriminating element, since its concentrations in otoliths were generally higher outside ports than in inside them, probably due to river runoff. Moreover, otolith signatures varied greatly by species and between sampling sites. Furthermore, although Cu and Pb concentrations in water were at least 2.3-34-fold higher inside ports than outside, this was not consistently reflected in fish otoliths, confirming that spatial differences in otolith concentrations depend on the species and do not directly reflect differences in environmental contamination levels. Therefore, it seems unlikely that otolith microchemistry could provide a universal fingerprint capable of discriminating ports from other coastal areas. Nevertheless, the contribution of ports to adult fish populations can be determined well by establishing a library of otolith fingerprints for all juvenile habitats.
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ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2427
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Auteur Grenie, M.; Mouillot, D.; Villeger, S.; Denelle, P.; Tucker, C.M.; Munoz, F.; Violle, C.
Titre Functional rarity of coral reef fishes at the global scale: Hotspots and challenges for conservation Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Conserv.
Volume 226 Numéro Pages 288-299
Mots-Clés biodiversity; Biodiversity facet; Coral triangle; diversity; ecology; ecosystem processes; Evolutionary distinctiveness; Functional distinctiveness; Funrar; marine-protected areas; ocean acidification; redundancy; species richness; trait; vulnerability
Résumé Characterizing functional diversity has become central in ecological research and for biodiversity assessment. Understanding the role of species with rare traits, i.e. functionally rare species, in community assembly, ecosystem dynamics and functioning has recently gained momentum. However, functional rarity is still ignored in conservation strategies. Here, we quantified global functional and evolutionary rarity for 2073 species of coral reef fishes and compared the rarity values to IUCN Red List status. Most species were functionally common but geographically rare. However, we found very weak correlation between functional rarity and evolutionary rarity. Functional rarity was highest for species classified as not evaluated or threatened by the IUCN Red List. The location of functional rarity hotspots (Tropical Eastern Pacific) did not match hotspots of species richness and evolutionary distinctiveness (Indo-Australian Archipelago), nor the currently protected areas. We argue that functional rarity should be acknowledged for both species and site prioritization in conservation strategies.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2434
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Auteur Bouchoucha, M.; Brach-Papa, C.; Gonzalez, J.-L.; Lenfant, P.; Darnaude, A.M.
Titre Growth, condition and metal concentration in juveniles of two Diplodus species in ports Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Pollution Bulletin
Volume 126 Numéro Supplement C Pages 31-42
Mots-Clés Coastal areas; Contamination; fish; Nursery habitats; Otoliths
Résumé High abundances of juvenile fish in certain ports suggest they might provide alternative nursery habitats for several species. To further investigate this possibility, post-settlement growth, metal uptake and body condition were estimated in 127 juveniles of two seabream species, collected in 2014–15, inside and outside the highly polluted ports of the Bay of Toulon. This showed that differences in local pollution levels (here in Hg, Cu, Pb and Zn) are not consistently mirrored within fish flesh. Muscle metal concentrations, below sanitary thresholds for both species, were higher in ports for Cu, Pb and V only. Otherwise, fish muscle composition principally differed by species or by year. Juvenile growth and condition were equivalent at all sites. Higher prey abundance in certain ports might therefore compensate the deleterious effects of pollution, resulting in similar sizes and body conditions for departing juvenile fish than in nearby natural habitats.
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Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0025-326x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2232
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Auteur Batsleer, J.; Marchal, P.; Vaz, S.; Vermard, V.; Rijnsdorp, A.D.; Poos, J.J.
Titre Exploring habitat credits to manage the benthic impact in a mixed fishery Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.
Volume 586 Numéro Pages 167-179
Mots-Clés growth; sea; reserves; marine protected areas; juvenile; Plaice; Eastern English Channel; Fleet dynamics; vms data; fishing disturbance; central english-channel; Cod; costs; Dynamic state variable modelling; georges bank; Mixed fisheries; tac; Total allowable catch
Résumé The performance of a combined catch quota and habitat credit system was explored to manage the sustainable exploitation of a mix of demersal fish species and reduce the benthic impacts of bottom trawl fisheries using a dynamic state variable model approach. The model was parameterised for the Eastern English Channel demersal mixed fishery using otter trawls or dredges. Target species differed in their association with habitat types. Restricting catch quota for plaice and cod had a limited effect on benthic impact, except when reduced to very low values, forcing the vessels to stay in port. Quota management had a minimal influence on fishing behaviour and hence resulted in a minimal reduction of benthic impact. Habitat credits may reduce the benthic impacts of the trawl fisheries at a minimal loss of landings and revenue, as vessels are still able to reallocate their effort to less vulnerable fishing grounds, while allowing the fishery to catch their catch quota and maintain their revenue. Only if they are reduced to extremely low levels can habitat credits potentially constrain fishing activities to levels that prevent the fisheries from using up the catch quota for the target species.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2283
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Auteur Roberts, C.M.; O’Leary, B.C.; McCauley, D.J.; Cury, P.M.; Duarte, C.M.; Lubchenco, J.; Pauly, D.; Sáenz-Arroyo, A.; Sumaila, U.R.; Wilson, R.W.; Worm, B.; Castilla, J.C.
Titre Marine reserves can mitigate and promote adaptation to climate change Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Pnas
Volume 114 Numéro 24 Pages 6167-6175
Mots-Clés ecological insurance; global change; Marine Protected Areas; Mpa; nature-based solution
Résumé Strong decreases in greenhouse gas emissions are required to meet the reduction trajectory resolved within the 2015 Paris Agreement. However, even these decreases will not avert serious stress and damage to life on Earth, and additional steps are needed to boost the resilience of ecosystems, safeguard their wildlife, and protect their capacity to supply vital goods and services. We discuss how well-managed marine reserves may help marine ecosystems and people adapt to five prominent impacts of climate change: acidification, sea-level rise, intensification of storms, shifts in species distribution, and decreased productivity and oxygen availability, as well as their cumulative effects. We explore the role of managed ecosystems in mitigating climate change by promoting carbon sequestration and storage and by buffering against uncertainty in management, environmental fluctuations, directional change, and extreme events. We highlight both strengths and limitations and conclude that marine reserves are a viable low-tech, cost-effective adaptation strategy that would yield multiple cobenefits from local to global scales, improving the outlook for the environment and people into the future.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0027-8424, 1091-6490 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2144
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