|   | 
Détails
   web
Enregistrements
Auteur Carvalho, P.G.; Jupiter, S.D.; Januchowski-Hartley, F.A.; Goetze, J.; Claudet, J.; Weeks, R.; Humphries, A.; White, C.
Titre Optimized fishing through periodically harvested closures Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Appl. Ecol.
Volume (down) 56 Numéro 8 Pages 1927-1936
Mots-Clés bioeconomic model; conservation; coral-reef fishes; fish behaviour; fisheries management; management; marine protected areas; marine reserves; new-zealand; outcomes; periodically harvested closures; population dynamics; vulnerability; yield
Résumé Periodically harvested closures are a widespread, centuries-old form of fisheries management that protects fish between pulse harvests and can generate high harvest efficiency by reducing fish wariness of fishing gear. However, the ability for periodic closures to also support high fisheries yields and healthy marine ecosystems is uncertain, despite increased promotion of periodic closures for managing fisheries and conserving ecosystems in the Indo-Pacific. We developed a bioeconomic fisheries model that considers changes in fish wariness, based on empirical field research, and quantified the extent to which periodic closures can simultaneously maximize harvest efficiency, fisheries yield and conservation of fish stocks. We found that periodic closures with a harvest schedule represented by closure for one to a few years between a single pulse harvest event can generate equivalent fisheries yield and stock abundance levels and greater harvest efficiency than achievable under conventional fisheries management with or without a permanent closure. Optimality of periodic closures at maximizing the triple objective of high harvest efficiency, high fisheries yield, and high stock abundance was robust to fish life history traits and to all but extreme levels of overfishing. With moderate overfishing, there emerged a trade-off between periodic closures that maximized harvest efficiency and no-take permanent closures that maximized yield; however, the gain in harvest efficiency outweighed the loss in yield for periodic closures when compared with permanent closures. Only with extreme overfishing, where fishing under nonspatial management would reduce the stock to <= 18% of its unfished level, was the harvest efficiency benefit too small for periodic closures to best meet the triple objective compared with permanent closures. Synthesis and applications. We show that periodically harvested closures can, in most cases, simultaneously maximize harvest efficiency, fisheries yield, and fish stock conservation beyond that achievable by no-take permanent closures or nonspatial management. Our results also provide design guidance, indicating that short closure periods between pulse harvest events are most appropriate for well-managed fisheries or areas with large periodic closures, whereas longer closure periods are more appropriate for small periodic closure areas and overfished systems.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000478601300007 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2619
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Goetze, J.S.; Claudet, J.; Januchowski-Hartley, F.; Langlois, T.J.; Wilson, S.K.; White, C.; Weeks, R.; Jupiter, S.D.
Titre Demonstrating multiple benefits from periodically harvested fisheries closures Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Appl. Ecol.
Volume (down) 55 Numéro 3 Pages 1102-1113
Mots-Clés analytical framework; conservation; coral-reef fishes; customary management; fisheries management; food security; locally managed marine areas; long-term; management; marine protected areas; marine reserve; matter; meta-analysis; metaanalysis; partially protected areas; periodically harvested closures; populations; reserves; small-scale fisheries; video
Résumé 1. Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) are one of the most common forms of fisheries management in Melanesia, demonstrating multiple objectives, including sustaining fish stocks and increasing catch efficiency to support small-scale fisheries. No studies have comprehensively assessed their ability to provide short-term fisheries benefits across the entire harvest regime. 2. We present a novel analytical framework to guide a meta-analysis and assist future research in conceptualizing and assessing the potential of PHCs to deliver benefits for multiple fisheries-related objectives. 3. Ten PHCs met our selection criteria and on average, they provided a 48% greater abundance and 92% greater biomass of targeted fishes compared with areas open to fishing prior to being harvested. 4. This translated into tangible harvest benefits, with fishers removing 21% of the abundance and 49% of the biomass within PHCs, resulting in few post-harvest protection benefits. 5. When PHCs are larger, closed for longer periods or well enforced, short-term fisheries benefits are improved. However, an increased availability of fish within PHCs leads to greater removal during harvests. 6. Synthesis and applications. Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) can provide short-term fisheries benefits. Use of the analytical framework presented here will assist in determining long-term fisheries and conservation benefits. We recommend PHCs be closed to fishing for as long as possible, be as large as possible, that compliance be encouraged via community engagement and enforcement, and strict deadlines/goals for harvesting set to prevent overfishing.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2345
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Kirkman, S.P.; Blamey, L.; Lamont, T.; Field, J.G.; Bianchi, G.; Huggett, J.A.; Hutchings, L.; Jackson-Veitch, J.; Jarre, A.; Lett, C.; Lipinski, M.R.; Mafwila, S.W.; Pfaff, M.C.; Samaai, T.; Shannon, L.J.; Shin, Y.-J.; van der Lingen, C.D.; Yemane, D.
Titre Spatial characterisation of the Benguela ecosystem for ecosystem-based management Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Afr. J. Mar. Sci.
Volume (down) 38 Numéro 1 Pages 7-22
Mots-Clés agulhas system; atlantic-ocean; biology; drivers; ecosystem approach to fisheries; large marine ecosystem; large marine ecosystem; marine spatial planning; models; monitoring; northern benguela; nursery areas; physical oceanography; regime shifts; sea use management; southern benguela; upwelling system; variability
Résumé The three countries of the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem (BCLME), namely Angola, Namibia and South Africa, have committed to implementing ecosystem-based management (EBM) including an ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF) in the region, to put in practice the principles of sustainable development in ocean-related matters. There is also recognition of the need for marine spatial planning (MSP) as a process for informing EBM with regard to the allocation and siting of ocean uses so that ecosystem health is ensured and trade-offs between ecosystem services are appropriately dealt with. Marine spatial planning is both an integrated and an area-based process, and this paper produces a spatial characterisation of the BCLME for achieving a common basis for MSP in the region, focusing on the oceanography, biology and fisheries. Recognising spatial variation in physical driving forces, primary and secondary production, trophic structures and species richness, four different subsystems are characterised: (1) north of the Angola-Benguela Front, (2) from the Angola-Benguela Front to Luderitz, (3) from Luderitz to Cape Agulhas, and (4) from Cape Agulhas to Port Alfred on the south-east coast of South Africa. Research and monitoring requirements of relevance for MSP and EBM in the region are identified, focusing on understanding variability and change, including with regard to the boundary areas identified for the system. To this end, 14 cross-shelf monitoring transects are proposed (including seven that are already being monitored) to estimate fluxes of biota, energy and materials within and between the subsystems. The usefulness of models for understanding ecosystem variability and changes is recognised and the need for fine-scale resolution of both sampling and modelling for adequate MSP as input to EBM for the often-conflicting interests of conserving biodiversity, and managing fisheries, recreation, offshore oil and gas exploration and exploitation, offshore mining and shipping routes, is emphasised.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1814-232x ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1658
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Marinesque, S.; Kaplan, D.; Rodwell, L.D.
Titre Global implementation of marine protected areas : is the developing world being left behind ? Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Policy
Volume (down) 36 Numéro 3 Pages 727-737
Mots-Clés Conservation targets; Developing world; Gap analysis; International policy; Marine protected areas (MPAs); Meta-analysis
Résumé While the global network of marine protected areas (MPAs) has recently been evaluated in the light of bio-geographic targets, there has been no attempt to evaluate the relative conservation efforts made by the different nations with regards to their level of socio-economic development. Using information mostly gathered from the world database on protected areas (WDPA), this paper gives a comparative assessment of MPA progress in countries from different economic categories, ranging from advanced economies to least developed countries (LDCs). Potentially explanatory socio-economic and environmental factors, such as fishing activity and existence of vulnerable marine ecosystems, for variability between nations in the level of MPA implementation are also explored. Existing MPA databases demonstrate a clear gap between developed and developing nations in MPA establishment, with advanced economies accounting for two thirds of the global MPA network. Patterns of MPA use, however, remain extremely heterogeneous between countries within each development group. International agreements on marine conservation, above and beyond the influence of country socioeconomic and environmental profiles, are identified as a stimulating factor to MPA implementation. The level dependence on marine resource extraction appears to impede MPA implementation, though the relationship is not statistically significant due to large heterogeneity among countries. Leading developed nations increasingly use MPAs to designate integrated and adaptive management areas, and implementation of large “no-take” reserves in relatively-pristine overseas areas continues to accelerate. These analyses highlight certain limitations regarding our ability to assess the true conservation effectiveness of the existing global MPA network and the need for improved indicators of MPA restrictions and management efforts.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0308-597x ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 204
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Manel, S.; Loiseau, N.; Andrello, M.; Fietz, K.; Goni, R.; Forcada, A.; Lenfant, P.; Kininmonth, S.; Marcos, C.; Marques, V.; Mallol, S.; Perez-Ruzafa, A.; Breusing, C.; Puebla, O.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Long-Distance Benefits of Marine Reserves: Myth or Reality? Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Trends Ecol. Evol.
Volume (down) 34 Numéro 4 Pages 342-354
Mots-Clés conservation; fish populations; floating objects; gene flow; large-scale; larval dispersal; population connectivity; protected areas; recruitment; spillover
Résumé Long-distance (>40-km) dispersal from marine reserves is poorly documented; yet, it can provide essential benefits such as seeding fished areas or connecting marine reserves into networks. From a meta-analysis, we suggest that the spatial scale of marine connectivity is underestimated due to the limited geographic extent of sampling designs. We also found that the largest marine reserves (>1000 km(2)) are the most isolated. These findings have important implications for the assessment of evolutionary, ecological, and socio-economic long-distance benefits of marine reserves. We conclude that existing methods to infer dispersal should consider the up-to-date genomic advances and also expand the spatial scale of sampling designs. Incorporating long-distance connectivity in conservation planning will contribute to increase the benefits of marine reserve networks.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2545
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement