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Auteur Parravicini, V.; Villeger, S.; McClanahan, T.R.; Arias-Gonzalez, J.E.; Bellwood, D.R.; Belmaker, J.; Chabanet, P.; Floeter, S.R.; Friedlander, A.M.; Guilhaumon, F.; Vigliola, L.; Kulbicki, M.; Mouillot, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Global mismatch between species richness and vulnerability of reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology Letters  
  Volume 17 Numéro 9 Pages 1101-1110  
  Mots-Clés Vulnerability; biodiversity; biodiversity loss; conservation; coral-reefs; extinction; fisheries; functional diversity; hotspots; macroecology; marine; patterns; protected areas; risk assessment; sensitivity  
  Résumé The impact of anthropogenic activity on ecosystems has highlighted the need to move beyond the biogeographical delineation of species richness patterns to understanding the vulnerability of species assemblages, including the functional components that are linked to the processes they support. We developed a decision theory framework to quantitatively assess the global taxonomic and functional vulnerability of fish assemblages on tropical reefs using a combination of sensitivity to species loss, exposure to threats and extent of protection. Fish assemblages with high taxonomic and functional sensitivity are often exposed to threats but are largely missed by the global network of marine protected areas. We found that areas of high species richness spatially mismatch areas of high taxonomic and functional vulnerability. Nevertheless, there is strong spatial match between taxonomic and functional vulnerabilities suggesting a potential win-win conservation-ecosystem service strategy if more protection is set in these locations.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 630  
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Auteur Bouchoucha, M.; Brach-Papa, C.; Gonzalez, J.-L.; Lenfant, P.; Darnaude, A.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Growth, condition and metal concentration in juveniles of two Diplodus species in ports Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Pollution Bulletin  
  Volume 126 Numéro Supplement C Pages 31-42  
  Mots-Clés Coastal areas; Contamination; fish; Nursery habitats; Otoliths  
  Résumé High abundances of juvenile fish in certain ports suggest they might provide alternative nursery habitats for several species. To further investigate this possibility, post-settlement growth, metal uptake and body condition were estimated in 127 juveniles of two seabream species, collected in 2014–15, inside and outside the highly polluted ports of the Bay of Toulon. This showed that differences in local pollution levels (here in Hg, Cu, Pb and Zn) are not consistently mirrored within fish flesh. Muscle metal concentrations, below sanitary thresholds for both species, were higher in ports for Cu, Pb and V only. Otherwise, fish muscle composition principally differed by species or by year. Juvenile growth and condition were equivalent at all sites. Higher prey abundance in certain ports might therefore compensate the deleterious effects of pollution, resulting in similar sizes and body conditions for departing juvenile fish than in nearby natural habitats.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0025-326x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2232  
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Auteur Jimenez, H.; Dumas, P.; Mouillot, D.; Bigot, L.; Ferraris, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Harvesting effects on functional structure and composition of tropical invertebrate assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 73 Numéro 2 Pages 420-428  
  Mots-Clés Bta; marine protected areas; shellfishing; species composition; tropical benthos  
  Résumé Anthropogenic disturbances affect ecosystem structure and functioning. The quantification of their impacts on highly diverse and structurally complex ecosystems, such as coral reefs, is challenging. These communities are facing rising fishing pressure, particularly on Pacific Islands such as New Caledonia. The main objective was to quantify harvesting effects on invertebrate assemblages across two contrasting habitats (soft- and hard-bottom), by comparing communities in marine protected areas (MPAs) with non-MPAs using 10 biological and ecological traits. Patterns of trait composition were compared with those of species composition by non-metric multidimensional scaling and permutational analysis of variance analyses. Traits most responsible for differences between MPAs and non-MPAs were determined using SIMPER analysis, and predictions on shellfishing effects were discussed. A total of 248 species were recorded in hard-bottom communities, mainly characterized by mobile epifauna living on corals, crawling, and possessing a shell (molluscs) or a cuticle (crabs and echinoderms). Soft-bottom habitats contained 166 species, dominated by burrowing and sedentary species, especially shelled (largely bivalves) and worm-like organisms. Clear differences in species and trait composition between MPA and non-MPAs were highlighted in both habitats. Harvesting activities have community-wide effects that change the functional composition of invertebrate assemblages, in particular in terms of living habits and mobility. The observed shifts in benthic communities can affect the functioning of tropical coastal ecosystems and need to be included in small-scale fisheries management in poorly known tropical environments.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1054-3139, 1095-9289 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1535  
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Auteur Maire, Eva; Cinner, J.; Velez, L.; Huchery, C.; Mora, C.; D'agata, S.; Vigliola, L.; Wantiez, L.; Kulbicki, M.; Mouillot, D. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) How accessible are coral reefs to people? A global assessment based on travel time Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Lett.  
  Volume 19 Numéro 4 Pages 351-360  
  Mots-Clés Accessibility; biodiversity; coral reefs; ecological-systems; fish assemblages; fisheries; marine protected areas; market access; population-density; predictors; social<bold>-</bold>ecological; species richness; travel time; vulnerability  
  Résumé The depletion of natural resources has become a major issue in many parts of the world, with the most accessible resources being most at risk. In the terrestrial realm, resource depletion has classically been related to accessibility through road networks. In contrast, in the marine realm, the impact on living resources is often framed into the Malthusian theory of human density around ecosystems. Here, we develop a new framework to estimate the accessibility of global coral reefs using potential travel time from the nearest human settlement or market. We show that 58% of coral reefs are located <30min from the nearest human settlement. We use a case study from New Caledonia to demonstrate that travel time from the market is a strong predictor of fish biomass on coral reefs. We also highlight a relative deficit of protection on coral reef areas near people, with disproportional protection on reefs far from people. This suggests that conservation efforts are targeting low-conflict reefs or places that may already be receiving de facto protection due to their isolation. Our global assessment of accessibility in the marine realm is a critical step to better understand the interplay between humans and resources.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1626  
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Auteur Eduardo Nole, L.; Frédou, T.; Souza Lira, A.; Padovani Ferreira, B.; Bertrand, A.; Ménard, F.; Lucena Frédou, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Identifying key habitat and spatial patterns of fish biodiversity in the tropical Brazilian continental shelf Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Continental Shelf Research  
  Volume 166 Numéro Pages 108-118  
  Mots-Clés Demersal fish assemblage; Fish assemblage structure; Habitat composition; Marine Protected Areas; Northeast Brazilian coast; Underwater footages  
  Résumé Knowledge of the spatial distribution of fish assemblages biodiversity and structure is essential for prioritizing areas of conservation. Here we describe the biodiversity and community structure of demersal fish assemblages and their habitat along the northeast Brazilian coast by combining bottom trawl data and underwater footage. Species composition was estimated by number and weight, while patterns of dominance were obtained based on frequency of occurrence and relative abundance. A total of 7235 individuals (830 kg), distributed in 24 orders, 49 families and 120 species were collected. Community structure was investigated through clustering analysis and by a non-metric multidimensional scaling technique. Finally, diversity was assessed based on six indices. Four major assemblages were identified, mainly associated with habitat type and depth range. The higher values of richness were found in sand substrate with rocks, coralline formations and sponges (SWCR) habitats, while higher values of diversity were found in habitats located on shallow waters (10–30 m). Further, assemblages associated with sponge-reef formations presented the highest values of richness and diversity. In management strategies of conservation, we thus recommend giving special attention on SWCR habitats, mainly those located on depths between 30 and 60 m. This can be achieved by an offshore expansion of existing MPAs and/or by the creation of new MPAs encompassing those environments.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0278-4343 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2384  
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