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Auteur Calo, A.; Lett, C.; Mourre, B.; Perez-Ruzafa, A.; Antonio Garcia-Charton, J. doi  openurl
  Titre Use of Lagrangian simulations to hindcast the geographical position of propagule release zones in a Mediterranean coastal fish Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Environ. Res.  
  Volume 134 Numéro Pages 16-27  
  Mots-Clés circulation; Mediterranean Sea; sea; dispersal; larval; habitat; marine protected areas; recruitment; variability; population connectivity; Dispersal distance; Lagrangian simulations; mesoscale eddies; Propagule release zones; Sea bream  
  Résumé The study of organism dispersal is fundamental for elucidating patterns of connectivity between populations, thus crucial for the design of effective protection and management strategies. This is especially challenging in the case of coastal fish, for which information on egg release zones (i.e. spawning grounds) is often lacking. Here we assessed the putative location of egg release zones of the saddled sea bream (Oblada melanura) along the southeastern coast of Spain in 2013. To this aim, we hindcasted propagule (egg and larva) dispersal using Lagrangian simulations, fed with species-specific information on early life history traits (ELTs), with two approaches: 1) back-tracking and 2) comparing settler distribution obtained from simulations to the analogous distribution resulting from otolith chemical analysis. Simulations were also used to assess which factors contributed the most to dispersal distances. Back-tracking simulations indicated that both the northern sector of the Murcia region and some traits of the North-African coast were hydrodynamically suitable to generate and drive the supply of larvae recorded along the coast of Murcia in 2013. With the second approach, based on the correlation between simulation outputs and field results (otolith chemical analysis), we found that the oceanographic characteristics of the study area could have determined the pattern of settler distribution recorded with otolith analysis in 2013 and inferred the geographical position of main O. melanura spawning grounds along the coast. Dispersal distance was found to be significantly affected by the geographical position of propagule release zones. The combination of methods used was the first attempt to assess the geographical position of propagule release zones in the Mediterranean Sea for O. melanura, and can represent a valuable approach for elucidating dispersal and connectivity patterns in other coastal species.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0141-1136 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection (down) 2313  
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Auteur Batsleer, J.; Marchal, P.; Vaz, S.; Vermard, V.; Rijnsdorp, A.D.; Poos, J.J. doi  openurl
  Titre Exploring habitat credits to manage the benthic impact in a mixed fishery Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 586 Numéro Pages 167-179  
  Mots-Clés growth; sea; reserves; marine protected areas; juvenile; Plaice; Eastern English Channel; Fleet dynamics; vms data; fishing disturbance; central english-channel; Cod; costs; Dynamic state variable modelling; georges bank; Mixed fisheries; tac; Total allowable catch  
  Résumé The performance of a combined catch quota and habitat credit system was explored to manage the sustainable exploitation of a mix of demersal fish species and reduce the benthic impacts of bottom trawl fisheries using a dynamic state variable model approach. The model was parameterised for the Eastern English Channel demersal mixed fishery using otter trawls or dredges. Target species differed in their association with habitat types. Restricting catch quota for plaice and cod had a limited effect on benthic impact, except when reduced to very low values, forcing the vessels to stay in port. Quota management had a minimal influence on fishing behaviour and hence resulted in a minimal reduction of benthic impact. Habitat credits may reduce the benthic impacts of the trawl fisheries at a minimal loss of landings and revenue, as vessels are still able to reallocate their effort to less vulnerable fishing grounds, while allowing the fishery to catch their catch quota and maintain their revenue. Only if they are reduced to extremely low levels can habitat credits potentially constrain fishing activities to levels that prevent the fisheries from using up the catch quota for the target species.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection (down) 2283  
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Auteur Bouchoucha, M.; Brach-Papa, C.; Gonzalez, J.-L.; Lenfant, P.; Darnaude, A.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Growth, condition and metal concentration in juveniles of two Diplodus species in ports Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Pollution Bulletin  
  Volume 126 Numéro Supplement C Pages 31-42  
  Mots-Clés Coastal areas; Contamination; fish; Nursery habitats; Otoliths  
  Résumé High abundances of juvenile fish in certain ports suggest they might provide alternative nursery habitats for several species. To further investigate this possibility, post-settlement growth, metal uptake and body condition were estimated in 127 juveniles of two seabream species, collected in 2014–15, inside and outside the highly polluted ports of the Bay of Toulon. This showed that differences in local pollution levels (here in Hg, Cu, Pb and Zn) are not consistently mirrored within fish flesh. Muscle metal concentrations, below sanitary thresholds for both species, were higher in ports for Cu, Pb and V only. Otherwise, fish muscle composition principally differed by species or by year. Juvenile growth and condition were equivalent at all sites. Higher prey abundance in certain ports might therefore compensate the deleterious effects of pollution, resulting in similar sizes and body conditions for departing juvenile fish than in nearby natural habitats.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0025-326x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection (down) 2232  
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Auteur Espinosa, F.; Rivera-Ingraham, G.A. doi  isbn
openurl 
  Titre Biological Conservation of Giant Limpets: The Implications of Large Size Type Chapitre de livre
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée  
  Volume Numéro Pages 105-155  
  Mots-Clés cymbula-nigra gastropoda; endangered limpet; lottia-gigantea; marine protected areas; mussel mytilus-galloprovincialis; patella-ferruginea gastropoda; population-structure; scutellastra-argenvillei; sex-change; south-african limpet  
  Résumé Patellogastropods, also known as true limpets, are distributed throughout the world and constitute key species in coastal ecosystems. Some limpet species achieve remarkable sizes, which in the most extreme cases can surpass 35 cm in shell length. In this review, we focus on giant limpets, which are defined as those with a maximum shell size surpassing 10 cm. According to the scientific literature, there are a total of 14 species across five genera that reach these larger sizes. Four of these species are threatened or in danger of extinction. Inhabiting the intertidal zones, limpets are frequently affected by anthropogenic impacts, namely collection by humans, pollution and habitat fragmentation. In the case of larger species, their conspicuous size has made them especially prone to human collection since prehistoric times. Size is not phylogeny-dependent among giant limpets, but is instead related to behavioural traits instead. Larger-sized species tend to be nonmigratory and territorial compared to those that are smaller. Collection by humans has been cited as the main cause behind the decline and/or extinction of giant limpet populations. Their conspicuously large size makes them the preferred target of human collection. Because they are protandric species, selectively eliminating larger specimens of a given population seriously compromises their viability and has led to local extinction events in some cases. Additionally, sustained collection over time may lead to microevolutionary responses that result in genetic changes. The growing presence of artificial structures in coastal ecosystems may cause population fragmentation and isolation, limiting the genetic flow and dispersion capacity of many limpet species. However, when they are necessitated, artificial structures could be managed to establish marine artificial microreserves and contribute to the conservation of giant limpet species that naturally settle on them.  
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  Editeur Elsevier Academic Press Inc Lieu de Publication San Diego Éditeur Curry, B.E.  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Advances in Marine Biology, Vol 76  
  Volume de collection 76 Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-0-12-812402-4 978-0-12-812401-7 Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection (down) 2180  
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Auteur Kaplan, D.M.; Cuif, M.; Fauvelot, C.; Vigliola, L.; Nguyen-Huu, T.; Tiavouane, J.; Lett, C. doi  openurl
  Titre Uncertainty in empirical estimates of marine larval connectivity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 74 Numéro 6 Pages 1723-1734  
  Mots-Clés connectivity; dispersal; Larval dispersal; management; model; parentage analysis; persistence; population; protected areas; Reef fish; reserves; self-recruitment; Transgenerational marking  
  Résumé Despite major advances in our capacity to measure marine larval connectivity (i.e. the pattern of transport of marine larvae from spawning to settlement sites) and the importance of these measurements for ecological and management questions, uncertainty in experimental estimates of marine larval connectivity has been given little attention. We review potential uncertainty sources in empirical larval connectivity studies and develop Bayesian statistical methods for estimating these uncertainties based on standard techniques in the mark-recapture and genetics literature. These methods are implemented in an existing R package for working with connectivity data, ConnMatTools, and applied to a number of published connectivity estimates. We find that the small sample size of collected settlers at destination sites is a dominant source of uncertainty in connectivity estimates in many published results. For example, widths of 95% CIs for relative connectivity, the value of which is necessarily between 0 and 1, exceeded 0.5 for many published connectivity results, complicating using individual results to conclude that marine populations are relatively closed or open. This “small sample size” uncertainty is significant even for studies with near-exhaustive sampling of spawners and settlers. Though largely ignored in the literature, the magnitude of this uncertainty is straightforward to assess. Better accountability of this and other uncertainties is needed in the future so that marine larval connectivity studies can fulfill their promises of providing important ecological insights and informing management questions (e.g. related to marine protected area network design, and stock structure of exploited organisms). In addition to using the statistical methods developed here, future studies should consistently evaluate and report a small number of critical factors, such as the exhaustivity of spawner and settler sampling, and the mating structure of target species in genetic studies.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection (down) 2170  
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