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Auteur Magris, R.A.; Andrello, M.; Pressey, R.L.; Mouillot, D.; Dalongeville, A.; Jacobi, M.N.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Biologically representative and well-connected marine reserves enhance biodiversity persistence in conservation planning Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Conserv. Lett.  
  Volume 11 Numéro 4 Pages Unsp-e12439  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity conservation; climate-change; coral-reefs; design; larval dispersal; marine protected areas; marine reserve design; networks; population connectivity; protected areas; spatial planning; spatial prioritization  
  Résumé Current methods in conservation planning for promoting the persistence of biodiversity typically focus on either representing species geographic distributions or maintaining connectivity between reserves, but rarely both, and take a focal species, rather than a multispecies, approach. Here, we link prioritization methods with population models to explore the impact of integrating both representation and connectivity into conservation planning for species persistence. Using data on 288 Mediterranean fish species with varying conservation requirements, we show that: (1) considering both representation and connectivity objectives provides the best strategy for enhanced biodiversity persistence and (2) connectivity objectives were fundamental to enhancing persistence of small-ranged species, which are most in need of conservation, while the representation objective benefited only wide-ranging species. Our approach provides a more comprehensive appraisal of planning applications than approaches focusing on either representation or connectivity, and will hopefully contribute to build more effective reserve networks for the persistence of biodiversity.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1755-263x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel (up) MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2423  
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Auteur Kirkman, S.P.; Blamey, L.; Lamont, T.; Field, J.G.; Bianchi, G.; Huggett, J.A.; Hutchings, L.; Jackson-Veitch, J.; Jarre, A.; Lett, C.; Lipinski, M.R.; Mafwila, S.W.; Pfaff, M.C.; Samaai, T.; Shannon, L.J.; Shin, Y.-J.; van der Lingen, C.D.; Yemane, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Spatial characterisation of the Benguela ecosystem for ecosystem-based management Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Afr. J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 38 Numéro 1 Pages 7-22  
  Mots-Clés agulhas system; atlantic-ocean; biology; drivers; ecosystem approach to fisheries; large marine ecosystem; large marine ecosystem; marine spatial planning; models; monitoring; northern benguela; nursery areas; physical oceanography; regime shifts; sea use management; southern benguela; upwelling system; variability  
  Résumé The three countries of the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem (BCLME), namely Angola, Namibia and South Africa, have committed to implementing ecosystem-based management (EBM) including an ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF) in the region, to put in practice the principles of sustainable development in ocean-related matters. There is also recognition of the need for marine spatial planning (MSP) as a process for informing EBM with regard to the allocation and siting of ocean uses so that ecosystem health is ensured and trade-offs between ecosystem services are appropriately dealt with. Marine spatial planning is both an integrated and an area-based process, and this paper produces a spatial characterisation of the BCLME for achieving a common basis for MSP in the region, focusing on the oceanography, biology and fisheries. Recognising spatial variation in physical driving forces, primary and secondary production, trophic structures and species richness, four different subsystems are characterised: (1) north of the Angola-Benguela Front, (2) from the Angola-Benguela Front to Luderitz, (3) from Luderitz to Cape Agulhas, and (4) from Cape Agulhas to Port Alfred on the south-east coast of South Africa. Research and monitoring requirements of relevance for MSP and EBM in the region are identified, focusing on understanding variability and change, including with regard to the boundary areas identified for the system. To this end, 14 cross-shelf monitoring transects are proposed (including seven that are already being monitored) to estimate fluxes of biota, energy and materials within and between the subsystems. The usefulness of models for understanding ecosystem variability and changes is recognised and the need for fine-scale resolution of both sampling and modelling for adequate MSP as input to EBM for the often-conflicting interests of conserving biodiversity, and managing fisheries, recreation, offshore oil and gas exploration and exploitation, offshore mining and shipping routes, is emphasised.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1814-232x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel (up) MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1658  
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Auteur Kaplan, D.M.; Cuif, M.; Fauvelot, C.; Vigliola, L.; Nguyen-Huu, T.; Tiavouane, J.; Lett, C. doi  openurl
  Titre Uncertainty in empirical estimates of marine larval connectivity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 74 Numéro 6 Pages 1723-1734  
  Mots-Clés connectivity; dispersal; Larval dispersal; management; model; parentage analysis; persistence; population; protected areas; Reef fish; reserves; self-recruitment; Transgenerational marking  
  Résumé Despite major advances in our capacity to measure marine larval connectivity (i.e. the pattern of transport of marine larvae from spawning to settlement sites) and the importance of these measurements for ecological and management questions, uncertainty in experimental estimates of marine larval connectivity has been given little attention. We review potential uncertainty sources in empirical larval connectivity studies and develop Bayesian statistical methods for estimating these uncertainties based on standard techniques in the mark-recapture and genetics literature. These methods are implemented in an existing R package for working with connectivity data, ConnMatTools, and applied to a number of published connectivity estimates. We find that the small sample size of collected settlers at destination sites is a dominant source of uncertainty in connectivity estimates in many published results. For example, widths of 95% CIs for relative connectivity, the value of which is necessarily between 0 and 1, exceeded 0.5 for many published connectivity results, complicating using individual results to conclude that marine populations are relatively closed or open. This “small sample size” uncertainty is significant even for studies with near-exhaustive sampling of spawners and settlers. Though largely ignored in the literature, the magnitude of this uncertainty is straightforward to assess. Better accountability of this and other uncertainties is needed in the future so that marine larval connectivity studies can fulfill their promises of providing important ecological insights and informing management questions (e.g. related to marine protected area network design, and stock structure of exploited organisms). In addition to using the statistical methods developed here, future studies should consistently evaluate and report a small number of critical factors, such as the exhaustivity of spawner and settler sampling, and the mating structure of target species in genetic studies.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel (up) MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2170  
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Auteur Bouchoucha, M.; Pecheyran, C.; Gonzalez, J.L.; Lenfant, P.; Darnaude, A.M. doi  openurl
  Titre Otolith fingerprints as natural tags to identify juvenile fish life in ports Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci.  
  Volume 212 Numéro Pages 210-218  
  Mots-Clés coastal habitats; Coastal areas; Contamination; elemental fingerprints; Fish; genus diplodus; la-icpms; nursery habitats; Nursery habitats; situ speciation measurements; sparid fishes; stable-isotopes; thin-films dgt; water chemistry; western mediterranean sea  
  Résumé The construction of ports has caused substantial habitat destruction in coastal areas previously used as nursery grounds by many fish species, with consequences to fish stocks. These artificial coastal areas might provide alternative nursery habitats for several species for juvenile fish abundances and growth in ports, although their contribution to adult stocks had never been estimated. The variability of otolith composition in the juveniles of two Diplodus species was investigated in three contrasting port areas and two adjacent coastal juvenile habitats of the Bay of Toulon (northwestern Mediterranean) in order to determine the possible use of otolith fingerprints as natural tags for the identification of juvenile fishes in ports. The global accuracy of discrimination between ports and coastal areas was very high (94%) irrespective of species, suggesting that otolith fingerprints can be used with confidence to retrospectively identify past residency in the ports of this bay. However, Ba was systematically the most discriminating element, since its concentrations in otoliths were generally higher outside ports than in inside them, probably due to river runoff. Moreover, otolith signatures varied greatly by species and between sampling sites. Furthermore, although Cu and Pb concentrations in water were at least 2.3-34-fold higher inside ports than outside, this was not consistently reflected in fish otoliths, confirming that spatial differences in otolith concentrations depend on the species and do not directly reflect differences in environmental contamination levels. Therefore, it seems unlikely that otolith microchemistry could provide a universal fingerprint capable of discriminating ports from other coastal areas. Nevertheless, the contribution of ports to adult fish populations can be determined well by establishing a library of otolith fingerprints for all juvenile habitats.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel (up) MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2427  
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Auteur Grenie, M.; Mouillot, D.; Villeger, S.; Denelle, P.; Tucker, C.M.; Munoz, F.; Violle, C. doi  openurl
  Titre Functional rarity of coral reef fishes at the global scale: Hotspots and challenges for conservation Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Conserv.  
  Volume 226 Numéro Pages 288-299  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; Biodiversity facet; Coral triangle; diversity; ecology; ecosystem processes; Evolutionary distinctiveness; Functional distinctiveness; Funrar; marine-protected areas; ocean acidification; redundancy; species richness; trait; vulnerability  
  Résumé Characterizing functional diversity has become central in ecological research and for biodiversity assessment. Understanding the role of species with rare traits, i.e. functionally rare species, in community assembly, ecosystem dynamics and functioning has recently gained momentum. However, functional rarity is still ignored in conservation strategies. Here, we quantified global functional and evolutionary rarity for 2073 species of coral reef fishes and compared the rarity values to IUCN Red List status. Most species were functionally common but geographically rare. However, we found very weak correlation between functional rarity and evolutionary rarity. Functional rarity was highest for species classified as not evaluated or threatened by the IUCN Red List. The location of functional rarity hotspots (Tropical Eastern Pacific) did not match hotspots of species richness and evolutionary distinctiveness (Indo-Australian Archipelago), nor the currently protected areas. We argue that functional rarity should be acknowledged for both species and site prioritization in conservation strategies.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel (up) MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2434  
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