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Auteur Hill, S.L.; Hinke, J.; Bertrand, S.; Fritz, L.; Furness, R.W.; Ianelli, J.N.; Murphy, M.; Oliveros‐Ramos, R.; Pichegru, L.; Sharp, R.; Stillman, R.A.; Wright, P.J.; Ratcliffe, N. url  doi
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  Titre (up) Reference points for predators will progress ecosystem-based management of fisheries Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish and Fisheries  
  Volume 21 Numéro 2 Pages 368-378  
  Mots-Clés adaptive management; Aichi Biodiversity Targets; ecosystem interactions; indirect impacts; management strategy; precautionary approach  
  Résumé Ecosystem-based management of fisheries aims to allow sustainable use of fished stocks while keeping impacts upon ecosystems within safe ecological limits. Both the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and the Aichi Biodiversity Targets promote these aims. We evaluate implementation of ecosystem-based management in six case-study fisheries in which potential indirect impacts upon bird or mammal predators of fished stocks are well publicized and well studied. In particular, we consider the components needed to enable management strategies to respond to information from predator monitoring. Although such information is available in all case-studies, only one has a reference point defining safe ecological limits for predators and none has a method to adjust fishing activities in response to estimates of the state of the predator population. Reference points for predators have been developed outside the fisheries management context, but adoption by fisheries managers is hindered a lack of clarity about management objectives and uncertainty about how fishing affects predator dynamics. This also hinders the development of adjustment methods because these generally require information on the state of ecosystem variables relative to reference points. Nonetheless, most of the case-studies include precautionary measures to limit impacts on predators. These measures are not used tactically and therefore risk excessive restrictions on sustainable use. Adoption of predator reference points to inform tactical adjustment of precautionary measures would be an appropriate next step towards ecosystem-based management.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1467-2979 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000505754400001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2684  
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Auteur Link, J.S.; Yemane, D.; Shannon, L.J.; Coll, M.; Shin, Y.-J.; Hill, L.; Borges, M.D. url  doi
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  Titre (up) Relating marine ecosystem indicators to fishing and environmental drivers : an elucidation of contrasting responses Type Article scientifique
  Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Ices Journal of Marine Science  
  Volume 67 Numéro Pages 787-795  
  Mots-Clés analyses; approaches; change; climate; dynamics; ecosystem; fisheries; indicators; multivariate; to  
  Résumé The usefulness of indicators in detecting ecosystem change depends on three main criteria: the availability of data to estimate the indicator (measurability), the ability to detect change in an ecosystem (sensitivity), and the ability to link the said change in an indicator as a response to a known intervention or pressure (specificity). Here, we specifically examine the third aspect of indicator change, with an emphasis on multiple methods to explore the “relativity” of major ecosystem drivers. We use a suite of multivariate methods to explore the relationships between a pre-established set of fisheries-orientated ecosystem status indicators and the key drivers for those ecosystems (particularly emphasizing proxy indicators for fishing and the environment). The results show the relative importance among fishing and environmental factors, which differed notably across the major types of ecosystems. Yet, they also demonstrated common patterns in which most ecosystems, and indicators of ecosystem dynamics are largely driven by fisheries (landings) or human (human development index) factors, and secondarily by environmental drivers (e.g. AMO, PDO, SST). How one might utilize this empirical evidence in future efforts for ecosystem approaches to fisheries is discussed, highlighting the need to manage fisheries in the context of environmental and other human (e.g. economic) drivers.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 88  
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Auteur Chassot, E.; Bonhommeau, S.; Reygondeau, G.; Nieto, K.; Polovina, J.J.; Huret, M.; Dulvy, N.K.; Demarcq, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Satellite remote sensing for an ecosystem approach to fisheries management Type Article scientifique
  Année 2011 Publication Revue Abrégée Ices Journal of Marine Science  
  Volume 68 Numéro Pages 651-666  
  Mots-Clés approach; ecosystem; fisheries; mesoscale; satellite; tracking  
  Résumé Satellite remote sensing (SRS) of the marine environment has become instrumental in ecology for environmental monitoring and impact assessment, and it is a promising tool for conservation issues. In the context of an ecosystem approach to fisheries management (EAFM), global, daily, systematic, high-resolution images obtained from satellites provide a good data source for incorporating habitat considerations into marine fish population dynamics. An overview of the most common SRS datasets available to fishery scientists and state-of-the-art data-processing methods is presented, focusing on recently developed techniques for detecting mesoscale features such as eddies, fronts, filaments, and river plumes of major importance in productivity enhancement and associated fish aggregation. A comprehensive review of remotely sensed data applications in fisheries over the past three decades for investigating the relationships between oceanographic conditions and marine resources is provided, emphasizing how synoptic and information-rich SRS data have become instrumental in ecological analyses at community and ecosystem scales. Finally, SRS data, in conjunction with automated in situ data-acquisition systems, can provide the scientific community with a major source of information for ecosystem modelling, a key tool for implementing an EAFM.  
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  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 129  
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Auteur Gounand, I.; Daufresne, T.; Gravel, D.; Bouvier, C.; Bouvier, T.; Combe, M.; Gougat-Barbera, C.; Poly, F.; Torres-Barcelo, C.; Mouquet, N. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Size evolution in microorganisms masks trade-offs predicted by the growth rate hypothesis Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume 283 Numéro 1845 Pages 20162272  
  Mots-Clés Bacteria; bacterial community; biological stoichiometry; cell-size; escherichia-coli; experimental evolution; fresh-water; growth rate hypothesis; inorganic polyphosphate; intrinsic growth; mechanistic approach; Pseudomonas fluorescens; resource competition; r/K strategies; Stoichiometry; variable environment  
  Résumé Adaptation to local resource availability depends on responses in growth rate and nutrient acquisition. The growth rate hypothesis (GRH) suggests that growing fast should impair competitive abilities for phosphorus and nitrogen due to high demand for biosynthesis. However, in microorganisms, size influences both growth and uptake rates, which may mask trade-offs and instead generate a positive relationship between these traits (size hypothesis, SH). Here, we evolved a gradient of maximum growth rate (mu(max)) from a single bacterium ancestor to test the relationship among mu(max), competitive ability for nutrients and cell size, while controlling for evolutionary history. We found a strong positive correlation between mu(max) and competitive ability for phosphorus, associated with a trade-off between mu(max) and cell size: strains selected for high mu(max) were smaller and better competitors for phosphorus. Our results strongly support the SH, while the trade-offs expected under GRH were not apparent. Beyond plasticity, unicellular populations can respond rapidly to selection pressure through joint evolution of their size and maximum growth rate. Our study stresses that physiological links between these traits tightly shape the evolution of competitive strategies.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2055  
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Auteur Kirkman, S.P.; Blamey, L.; Lamont, T.; Field, J.G.; Bianchi, G.; Huggett, J.A.; Hutchings, L.; Jackson-Veitch, J.; Jarre, A.; Lett, C.; Lipinski, M.R.; Mafwila, S.W.; Pfaff, M.C.; Samaai, T.; Shannon, L.J.; Shin, Y.-J.; van der Lingen, C.D.; Yemane, D. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Spatial characterisation of the Benguela ecosystem for ecosystem-based management Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Afr. J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 38 Numéro 1 Pages 7-22  
  Mots-Clés agulhas system; atlantic-ocean; biology; drivers; ecosystem approach to fisheries; large marine ecosystem; large marine ecosystem; marine spatial planning; models; monitoring; northern benguela; nursery areas; physical oceanography; regime shifts; sea use management; southern benguela; upwelling system; variability  
  Résumé The three countries of the Benguela Current Large Marine Ecosystem (BCLME), namely Angola, Namibia and South Africa, have committed to implementing ecosystem-based management (EBM) including an ecosystem approach to fisheries (EAF) in the region, to put in practice the principles of sustainable development in ocean-related matters. There is also recognition of the need for marine spatial planning (MSP) as a process for informing EBM with regard to the allocation and siting of ocean uses so that ecosystem health is ensured and trade-offs between ecosystem services are appropriately dealt with. Marine spatial planning is both an integrated and an area-based process, and this paper produces a spatial characterisation of the BCLME for achieving a common basis for MSP in the region, focusing on the oceanography, biology and fisheries. Recognising spatial variation in physical driving forces, primary and secondary production, trophic structures and species richness, four different subsystems are characterised: (1) north of the Angola-Benguela Front, (2) from the Angola-Benguela Front to Luderitz, (3) from Luderitz to Cape Agulhas, and (4) from Cape Agulhas to Port Alfred on the south-east coast of South Africa. Research and monitoring requirements of relevance for MSP and EBM in the region are identified, focusing on understanding variability and change, including with regard to the boundary areas identified for the system. To this end, 14 cross-shelf monitoring transects are proposed (including seven that are already being monitored) to estimate fluxes of biota, energy and materials within and between the subsystems. The usefulness of models for understanding ecosystem variability and changes is recognised and the need for fine-scale resolution of both sampling and modelling for adequate MSP as input to EBM for the often-conflicting interests of conserving biodiversity, and managing fisheries, recreation, offshore oil and gas exploration and exploitation, offshore mining and shipping routes, is emphasised.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1814-232x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1658  
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