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Auteur (up) Galasso, H.L.; Richard, M.; Lefebvre, S.; Aliaume, C.; Callier, M.D. doi  openurl
  Titre Body size and temperature effects on standard metabolic rate for determining metabolic scope for activity of the polychaete Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée PeerJ  
  Volume 6 Numéro Pages e5675  
  Mots-Clés adaptation; Aerobic scope; Allometric coefficient; annelida; Annelida; Arrhenius temperature; Deposit-feeder; growth; Growth; muller; nereididae; Oxygen consumption; oxygen-uptake; populations; respiration; salinity; ventilation  
  Résumé Considering the ecological importance and potential value of Hediste diversicolor, a better understanding of its metabolic rate and potential growth rates is required. The aims of this study are: (i) to describe key biometric relationships; (ii) to test the effects of temperature and body size on standard metabolic rate (as measure by oxygen consumption) to determine critical parameters, namely Arrhenius temperature (T-A), allometric coefficient (b) and reaction rate; and (iii) to determine the metabolic scope for activity (MSA) of H. diversicolor for further comparison with published specific growth rates. Individuals were collected in a Mediterranean lagoon (France). After 10 days of acclimatization, 7 days at a fixed temperature and 24 h of fasting, resting oxygen consumption rates (VO2) were individually measured in the dark at four different temperatures (11, 17, 22 and 27 degrees C) in worms weighing from 4 to 94 mgDW (n = 27 per temperature). Results showed that DW and L3 were the most accurate measurements of weight and length, respectively, among all the metrics tested. Conversion of WW (mg), DW (mg) and L3 (mm) were quantified with the following equations: DW = 0.15 x WW, L3 = 0.025 x TL(mm) + 1.44 and DW = 0.8 x L3(3.68). Using an equation based on temperature and allometric effects, the allometric coefficient (b) was estimated at 0.8 for DW and at 2.83 for L3. The reaction rate (VO2) equaled to 12.33 mu mol gDW(-1) h(-1) and 0.05 mu mol mm L3(-1) h(-)(1) at the reference temperature (20 degrees C, 293.15 K). Arrhenius temperature (T-A) was 5,707 and 5,664 K (for DW and L3, respectively). Metabolic scope for activity ranged from 120.1 to 627.6 J gDW(-1) d(-1). Predicted maximum growth rate increased with temperature, with expected values of 7-10% in the range of 15-20 degrees C. MSA was then used to evaluate specific growth rates (SGR) in several experiments. This paper may be used as a reference and could have interesting applications in the fields of aquaculture, ecology and biogeochemical processes.  
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  ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Médium  
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Auteur (up) Killen, S.S.; Marras, S.; Metcalfe, N.B.; McKenzie, D.J.; Domenici, P. url  doi
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  Titre Environmental stressors alter relationships between physiology and behaviour Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Trends in Ecology & Evolution  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés aerobic scope; environmental change; intraspecific variation; metabolic rate; personality; stress  
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  ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 576  
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Auteur (up) Lefevre, S.; Mckenzie, D.J.; Nilsson, G.E. doi  openurl
  Titre Models projecting the fate of fish populations under climate change need to be based on valid physiological mechanisms Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.  
  Volume 23 Numéro 9 Pages 3449-3459  
  Mots-Clés aerobic scope; coryphaena-hippurus; energy-demand teleosts; gadus-morhua l; gill surface area; growth; makaira-nigricans; marlin tetrapturus-albidus; metabolism; metabolism-size relationship; oxygen consumption; oxygen-consumption; ram ventilation; Respiration; scaling; swimming performance; tuna katsuwonus-pelamis  
  Résumé Some recent modelling papers projecting smaller fish sizes and catches in a warmer future are based on erroneous assumptions regarding (i) the scaling of gills with body mass and (ii) the energetic cost of 'maintenance'. Assumption (i) posits that insurmountable geometric constraints prevent respiratory surface areas from growing as fast as body volume. It is argued that these constraints explain allometric scaling of energy metabolism, whereby larger fishes have relatively lower mass-specific metabolic rates. Assumption (ii) concludes that when fishes reach a certain size, basal oxygen demands will not be met, because of assumption (i). We here demonstrate unequivocally, by applying accepted physiological principles with reference to the existing literature, that these assumptions are not valid. Gills are folded surfaces, where the scaling of surface area to volume is not constrained by spherical geometry. The gill surface area can, in fact, increase linearly in proportion to gill volume and body mass. We cite the large body of evidence demonstrating that respiratory surface areas in fishes reflect metabolic needs, not vice versa, which explains the large interspecific variation in scaling of gill surface areas. Finally, we point out that future studies basing their predictions on models should incorporate factors for scaling of metabolic rate and for temperature effects on metabolism, which agree with measured values, and should account for interspecific variation in scaling and temperature effects. It is possible that some fishes will become smaller in the future, but to make reliable predictions the underlying mechanisms need to be identified and sought elsewhere than in geometric constraints on gill surface area. Furthermore, to ensure that useful information is conveyed to the public and policymakers about the possible effects of climate change, it is necessary to improve communication and congruity between fish physiologists and fisheries scientists.  
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  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium  
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Auteur (up) McKenzie, D.J.; Hoglund, E.; Dupont-Prinet, A.; Larsen, B.K.; Skov, P.V.; Pedersen, P.B.; Jokumsen, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Effects of stocking density and sustained aerobic exercise on growth, energetics and welfare of rainbow trout Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquaculture  
  Volume 338 Numéro Pages 216-222  
  Mots-Clés Aerobic scope; charr salvelinus-alpinus; Cortisol; Critical swimming speed; current issues; feeding-behavior; fish welfare; juvenile arctic charr; oncorhynchus-mykiss; respiratory physiology; respirometry; salmon salmo-salar; Stress; stress-response; swimming performance; Welfare indicator  
  Résumé Two stocking densities, “low” (L, between similar to 19 and similar to 25 kg m(-3)) and “high” (H, between similar to 75 and similar to 100 kg m(-3)) were compared for effects on specific growth rate (SGR), feed conversion, energetics and welfare of rainbow trout reared at 14 degrees C either in static water (S) or swimming in a gentle current of similar to 0.9 bodylengths s(-1) (C). Trout (initial mass similar to 110 g) were reared for 9 weeks in circular tanks (volume 0.6 m(3)), in triplicate of four conditions (LS, LC, HS, HC). Fish were fed ad-libitum daily: waste pellets were swirl-collected at the outflow to calculate feed intake. SGR was measured each three weeks for the last six weeks of the trial. The tanks functioned as intermittent-stopped flow respirometers, to permit metabolic rate to be measured as instantaneous oxygen uptake once per hour. Mean (+/-SD) SGR was significantly lower at H than L (1.51 +/- 0.03 vs 1.44 +/- 0.04% day(-1), respectively, n = 6) and lowest in HC. When compared over a similar interval of mass gain, H groups had approximately 25% higher metabolic rates than L, with the highest rates in the HC condition. As a result, fish in the H groups dissipated a greater amount of feed energy as metabolism and, across all groups, there was a direct negative relationship between the quantity of energy dissipated and their SCR. There was no evidence of a neuroendocrine stress response, plasma cortisol was around 1 ng ml(-1) in all conditions. An acute crowding stress increased plasma cortisol to above 120 ng ml(-1) in all groups, but C groups recovered to control levels within 8 h whereas S groups required 20 h. Respirometry on individuals revealed that H fish had approximately 14% higher metabolic rates than L fish, indicating that increased metabolic rate in rearing tanks was in part physiological. The H groups had approximately 15% lower critical swimming speeds than the L groups which, together with their raised metabolic rate, indicated a physiological impairment Thus, high density reduced SGR by raising energy dissipation, at least partially as a physiological response by the fish, although there was no evidence of an endocrine stress response. The only beneficial effect of C was in recovery from acute stress. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
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Auteur (up) Wang, T.; Lefevre, S.; Iversen, N.K.; Findorf, I.; Buchanan, R.; McKenzie, D.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Anaemia only causes a small reduction in the upper critical temperature of sea bass: is oxygen delivery the limiting factor for tolerance of acute warming in fishes? Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Biology  
  Volume 217 Numéro 24 Pages 4275-4278  
  Mots-Clés aerobic scope; cardiac-performance; Cardiovascular; climate-change; dicentrarchus-labrax; ecology; exp. biol. 216; fish; Haematocrit; metabolism; Oxygen transport; phenylhydrazine-induced anemia; thermal tolerance; trout  
  Résumé To address how the capacity for oxygen transport influences tolerance of acute warming in fishes, we investigated whether a reduction in haematocrit, by means of intra-peritoneal injection of the haemolytic agent phenylhydrazine, lowered the upper critical temperature of sea bass. A reduction in haematocrit from 42 +/- 2% to 20 +/- 3% (mean +/- s.e.m.) caused a significant but minor reduction in upper critical temperature, from 35.8 +/- 0.1 to 35.1 +/- 0.2 degrees C, with no correlation between individual values for haematocrit and upper thermal limit. Anaemia did not influence the rise in oxygen uptake between 25 and 33 degrees C, because the anaemic fish were able to compensate for reduced blood oxygen carrying capacity with a significant increase in cardiac output. Therefore, in sea bass the upper critical temperature, at which they lost equilibrium, was not determined by an inability of the cardio-respiratory system to meet the thermal acceleration of metabolic demands.  
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  ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes <p>ISI Document Delivery No.: AW7BT<br/>Times Cited: 1<br/>Cited Reference Count: 44<br/>Wang, Tobias Lefevre, Sjannie Iversen, Nina K. Findorf, Inge Buchanan, Rasmus McKenzie, David J.<br/>Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS); Danish Research Council; Region Languedoc-Roussillon (RLR); Ambassade de France in Copenhagen; Universite Montpellier 2<br/>This research was supported by the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), the Danish Research Council, The Ambassade de France in Copenhagen and Universite Montpellier 2. T.W. was supported by a fellowship from Region Languedoc-Roussillon (RLR) as a visiting professor at Universite Montpellier 2. I.F. and N.K.I. were supported by a student grant from The Ambassade de France in Copenhagen.<br/>Company of biologists ltd<br/>Cambridge</p> Approuvé pas de  
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