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Auteur Damsgaard, C.; Baliga, V.B.; Bates, E.; Burggren, W.; McKenzie, D.J.; Taylor, E.; Wright, P.A.
Titre Evolutionary and cardio-respiratory physiology of air-breathing and amphibious fishes Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Acta Physiol.
Volume Numéro Pages Unsp-e13406
Mots-Clés acid-base; catfish clarias-gariepinus; development; developmental physiology; different strategies; evolution; kryptolebias-marmoratus; lungfish protopterus; metabolic-rate; phenotypic plasticity; risk-taking; terrestrial acclimation; terrestrialization; tinca-tinca l; water-to-air transition
Résumé Air-breathing and amphibious fishes are essential study organisms to shed insight into the required physiological shifts that supported the full transition from aquatic water-breathing fishes to terrestrial air-breathing tetrapods. While the origin of air-breathing in the evolutionary history of the tetrapods has received considerable focus, much less is known about the evolutionary physiology of air-breathing among fishes. This review summarizes recent advances within the field with specific emphasis on the cardiorespiratory regulation associated with air-breathing and terrestrial excursions, and how respiratory physiology of these living transitional forms are affected by development and personality. Finally, we provide a detailed and re-evaluated model of the evolution of air-breathing among fishes that serves as a framework for addressing new questions on the cardiorespiratory changes associated with it. This review highlights the importance of combining detailed studies on piscine air-breathing model species with comparative multi-species studies, to add an additional dimension to our understanding of the evolutionary physiology of air-breathing in vertebrates.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1748-1708 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000495996100001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2665
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Auteur Lefevre, S.; Domenici, P.; McKenzie, D.J.
Titre Swimming in air-breathing fishes Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Fish Biology
Volume 84 Numéro 3 Pages 661-681
Mots-Clés acid-base; aerobic metabolism; amia-calva; bimodal respiration; dicentrarchus-labrax; european sea-bass; exercise; exhaustive exercise; gar lepisosteus-platyrhincus; megalops-cyprinoides; pacific; partitioning; rainbow-trout; recovery; respiratory; tarpon; trout oncorhynchus-mykiss
Résumé Fishes with bimodal respiration differ in the extent of their reliance on air breathing to support aerobic metabolism, which is reflected in their lifestyles and ecologies. Many freshwater species undertake seasonal and reproductive migrations that presumably involve sustained aerobic exercise. In the six species studied to date, aerobic exercise in swim flumes stimulated air-breathing behaviour, and there is evidence that surfacing frequency and oxygen uptake from air show an exponential increase with increasing swimming speed. In some species, this was associated with an increase in the proportion of aerobic metabolism met by aerial respiration, while in others the proportion remained relatively constant. The ecological significance of anaerobic swimming activities, such as sprinting and fast-start manoeuvres during predator-prey interactions, has been little studied in air-breathing fishes. Some species practise air breathing during recovery itself, while others prefer to increase aquatic respiration, possibly to promote branchial ion exchange to restore acid-base balance, and to remain quiescent and avoid being visible to predators. Overall, the diversity of air-breathing fishes is reflected in their swimming physiology as well, and further research is needed to increase the understanding of the differences and the mechanisms through which air breathing is controlled and used during exercise.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 877
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Auteur Rummer, J.L.; Bouyoucos, I.A.; Mourier, J.; Nakamura, N.; Planes, S.
Titre Responses of a coral reef shark acutely exposed to ocean acidification conditions Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Coral Reefs
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés Acid-base; Blacktip reef shark; Climate change; dynamics; exercise; Haematology; metabolism; Oxygen uptake rates; Physiology
Résumé Anthropogenic ocean acidification (OA) is a threat to coral reef fishes, but few studies have investigated responses of high-trophic-level predators, including sharks. We tested the effects of 72-hr exposure to OA-relevant elevated partial pressures of carbon dioxide (pCO(2)) on oxygen uptake rates, acid-base status, and haematology of newborn tropical blacktip reef sharks (Carcharhinus melanopterus). Acute exposure to end-of-centurypCO(2)levels resulted in elevated haematocrit (i.e. stress or compensation of oxygen uptake rates) and blood lactate concentrations (i.e. prolonged recovery) in the newborns. Conversely, whole blood and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentrations, blood pH, estimates of standard and maximum metabolic rates, and aerobic scope remained unaffected. Taken together, newborn blacktip reef sharks appear physiologically robust to end-of-centurypCO(2)levels, but less so than other, previously investigated, tropical carpet sharks. Our results suggest peak fluctuatingpCO(2)levels in coral reef lagoons could still physiologically affect newborn reef sharks, but studies assessing the effects of long-term exposure and in combination with other anthropogenic stressors are needed.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0722-4028 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000545276900001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2824
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