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Auteur Liess, A.; Faithfull, C.; Reichstein, B.; Rowe, O.; Guo, J.; Pete, R.; Thomsson, G.; Uszko, W.; Francoeur, S.N.
Titre Terrestrial runoff may reduce microbenthic net community productivity by increasing turbidity: a Mediterranean coastal lagoon mesocosm experiment Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Hydrobiologia
Volume (down) 753 Numéro 1 Pages 205-218
Mots-Clés Bacteria; Dissolved organic carbon (DOC); Ecology; Enclosure experiment; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Microbenthos; Nutrient subsidy; Terrestrial subsidy; Zoology
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ISSN 0018-8158, 1573-5117 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1338
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Auteur Zudaire, I.; Murua, H.; Grande, M.; Goñi, N.; Potier, M.; Ménard, F.; Chassot, E.; Bodin, N.
Titre Variations in the diet and stable isotope ratios during the ovarian development of female yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) in the Western Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar Biol
Volume (down) 162 Numéro 12 Pages 2363-2377
Mots-Clés Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Marine & Freshwater Sciences; Microbiology; Oceanography; Zoology
Résumé The feeding strategy of female yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) during their reproductive cycle was investigated using a combination of different trophic tracers, i.e., stomach contents and dual stable isotope analysis, along with an assessment of ovarian development based on a histological analysis. To complete these analyses, we collected 215 female yellowfin from the Western Indian Ocean in 2009 and 2010. From these fish, we noted the ovarian development and analyzed the contents of 166 non-empty stomachs and 104 liver and muscle tissue samples. Stomach content analysis identified a large variety of prey species (45 prey families), key groups including crustaceans dominated by the swimming crab Charybdis smithii and crustacean larvae; fish dominated by the cigarfish Cubiceps pauciradiatus; and cephalopods dominated by ommastrephids Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis and Ornithoteuthis volatilis. Individuals capable of spawning appeared to feed intensively, particularly on cigarfish, during the reproductive period. From the mean reconstituted weight values of the preys, our results indicated that this intensive feeding led to increased amounts of acquired energy. The results of the stable isotope analyses, carried out on the muscle and liver tissues, indicated a clear decrease in values from north to south. These analyses also showed that liver δ15N values in spawning females were significantly lower than those in immature and developing individuals. This latter observation highlights the differences in metabolic processes that occur between tissues during ovarian development and underlines the importance of the liver in energy acquisition and mobilization in female yellowfin tuna during reproduction.
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ISSN 0025-3162, 1432-1793 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1405
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Auteur Navarro, J.; López, L.; Coll, M.; Barría, C.; Sáez-Liante, R.
Titre Short- and long-term importance of small sharks in the diet of the rare deep-sea shark Dalatias licha Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar Biol
Volume (down) 161 Numéro 7 Pages 1697-1707
Mots-Clés Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Marine & Freshwater Sciences; Microbiology; Oceanography; Zoology
Résumé Knowing the trophic ecology of marine predators is essential to develop an understanding of their ecological role in ecosystems. Research conducted on deep-sea and threatened shark species is limited. Here, by combining analyses of individual stomach contents and stable isotope values, we examined the trophic ecology (dietary composition and trophic position) of the kitefin shark Dalatias licha, a deep-sea shark considered as near threatened globally and as data deficient in the Mediterranean Sea. Results revealed the importance of small sharks in the diet of the kitefin shark at short- and long-term scales, although fin-fish, crustaceans and cephalopods were also found. Predation on sharks reveals the high trophic position of the kitefin shark within the food web of the western Mediterranean Sea. Stable isotope values from liver and muscle tissues confirmed our results from stomach content analysis and the high trophic position.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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ISSN 0025-3162, 1432-1793 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 385
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Auteur van Gils, J.A.; van der Geest, M.; De Meulenaer, B.; Gillis, H.; Piersma, T.; Folmer, E.O.
Titre Moving on with foraging theory: incorporating movement decisions into the functional response of a gregarious shorebird Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Animal Ecology
Volume (down) 84 Numéro Pages 554-564
Mots-Clés competition continuous-time Markov chain cryptic interference diet distribution habitat choice intake rate movement ecology predation toxic prey SPATIAL-DISTRIBUTION RED KNOTS MODELING INTERFERENCE CRYPTIC INTERFERENCE STOCHASTIC VERSION BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY MULTISTATE MODELS BANC-DARGUIN GROUP-SIZE PREY Ecology Zoology
Résumé 1. Models relating intake rate to food abundance and competitor density (generalized functional response models) can predict forager distributions and movements between patches, but we lack understanding of how distributions and small-scale movements by the foragers themselves affect intake rates. Using a state-of-the-art approach based on continuous-time Markov chain dynamics, we add realism to classic functional response models by acknowledging that the chances to encounter food and competitors are influenced by movement decisions, and, vice versa, that movement decisions are influenced by these encounters. We used a multi-state modelling framework to construct a stochastic functional response model in which foragers alternate between three behavioural states: searching, handling and moving. Using behavioural observations on a molluscivore migrant shorebird (red knot, Calidris canutus canutus), at its main wintering area (Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania), we estimated transition rates between foraging states as a function of conspecific densities and densities of the two main bivalve prey. Intake rate decreased with conspecific density. This interference effect was not due to decreased searching efficiency, but resulted from time lost to avoidance movements. Red knots showed a strong functional response to one prey (Dosinia isocardia), but a weak response to the other prey (Loripes lucinalis). This corroborates predictions from a recently developed optimal diet model that accounts for the mildly toxic effects due to consuming Loripes. Using model averaging across the most plausible multi-state models, the fully parameterized functional response model was then used to predict intake rate for an independent data set on habitat choice by red knot. Comparison of the sites selected by red knots with random sampling sites showed that the birds fed at sites with higher than average Loripes and Dosinia densities, that is sites for which we predicted higher than average intake rates. We discuss the limitations of Holling's classic functional response model which ignores movement and the limitations of contemporary movement ecological theory that ignores consumer-resource interactions. With the rapid advancement of technologies to track movements of individual foragers at fine spatial scales, the time is ripe to integrate descriptive tracking studies with stochastic movement-based functional response models.
Adresse [van Gils, Jan A.; van der Geest, Matthijs; De Meulenaer, Brecht; Gillis, Hanneke; Piersma, Theunis; Folmer, Eelke O.] NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. [van der Geest, Matthijs; Piersma, Theunis] Univ Groningen, Anim Ecol Grp, Ctr Ecol & Evolutionary Studies CEES, Chair Global Flyway Ecol, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. van Gils, JA (reprint author), NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, POB 59, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. Jan.van.Gils@nioz.nl
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Médium
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Notes ISI Document Delivery No.: CB9RB Times Cited: 0 Cited Reference Count: 61 van Gils, Jan A. van der Geest, Matthijs De Meulenaer, Brecht Gillis, Hanneke Piersma, Theunis Folmer, Eelke O. NWO WOTRO [W.01.65.221.00]; NWO [R 84-639]; NWO VIDI [864.09.002] We thank Parc National du Banc d'Arguin (PNBA) for their hospitality, the hosting of our presence and the permission to work in and from the Iwik scientific station. Lemhaba ould Yarba made the logistic arrangements. Joop van Eerbeek, Erik J. Jansen, Han Olff and El-Hacen Mohamed El-Hacen helped collecting and sorting benthos samples. Valuable comments on the manuscript were given by Allert Bijleveld, Jaap van der Meer, Ola Olsson, Thomas Oudman, Isabel M. Smallegange, an anonymous referee and by the 'literature club' of the Centre for Integrative Ecology during JAvG's sabbatical at Deakin University. Dick Visser polished the figures. This work is supported by an NWO WOTRO Integrated Programme grant (W.01.65.221.00) to TP, an NWO travel grant (R 84-639) to EOF, and an NWO VIDI grant (864.09.002) to JAvG. 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL HOBOKEN J ANIM ECOL Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ 1412 collection 1383
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Auteur Le Vaillant, M.; Viblanc, V.A.; Saraux, C.; Bohec, C.L.; Maho, Y.L.; Kato, A.; Criscuolo, F.; Ropert-Coudert, Y.
Titre Telomere length reflects individual quality in free-living adult king penguins Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Polar Biol
Volume (down) 38 Numéro 12 Pages 2059-2067
Mots-Clés Body condition; Breeding performances; Ecology; Long-lived seabird; Microbiology; Natural antibody level; Oceanography; Plant Sciences; Zoology
Résumé Growing evidence suggests that telomeres, non-coding DNA sequences that shorten with age and stress, are related in an undefined way to individual breeding performances and survival rates in several species. Short telomeres and elevated shortening rates are typically associated with life stress and low health. As such, telomeres could serve as an integrative proxy of individual quality, describing the overall biological state of an individual at a given age. Telomere length could be associated with the decline of an array of physiological traits in age-controlled individuals. Here, we investigated the links between individuals’ relative telomere length, breeding performance and various physiological (body condition, natural antibody levels) and life history (age, past breeding success) parameters in a long-lived seabird species, the king penguin Aptenodytes patagonicus. While we observed no link between relative telomere length and age, we found that birds with longer telomeres arrived earlier for breeding at the colony, and had higher breeding performances (i.e. the amount of time adults managed to maintain their chicks alive, and ultimately breeding success) than individuals with shorter telomeres. Further, we observed a positive correlation between telomere length and natural antibody levels. Taken together, our results add to the growing evidence that telomere length is likely to reflect individual quality difference in wild animal.
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ISSN 0722-4060, 1432-2056 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1450
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