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Auteur Escalle, L.; Gaertner, D.; Chavance, P.; Murua, H.; Simier, M.; Jose Pascual-Alayon, P.; Menard, F.; Ruiz, J.; Abascal, F.; Mérigot, B. doi  openurl
  Titre Catch and bycatch captured by tropical tuna purse-seine fishery in whale and whale shark associated sets: comparison with free school and FAD sets Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Biodivers. Conserv.  
  Volume 28 Numéro 2 Pages 467-499  
  Mots-Clés diversity; mortality; atlantic; biology; Bycatch; strategies; Megafauna; behavior; dominance; yellowfin; Catch composition; Diversity; Ecosystem approach to fisheries management; swimming speeds; Tuna purse-seine fishery  
  Résumé In an ecosystem approach to fisheries management (EAFM) framework of the tuna purse-seine fishery, the assessment of target species, but also that of bycatch species, is essential. In the Atlantic and Indian oceans, purse-seine nets are sometimes set around tuna schools associated with whale sharks and baleen whales, although less frequently than around free-swimming tuna schools or those associated with fish aggregating devices (FAD). However, knowledge on the targeted catch and bycatch in these megafauna associated fishing sets is still relatively limited. Therefore, the aims of this study were to assess species and size composition of the target tuna species, as well as the diversity of bycatch species in whale and whale shark associated sets. Whale associated sets were found to be very similar to free school sets in terms of tuna catch (large yellowfin tuna), bycatch occurrence (presence in half the sets) and species assemblage (alpha and beta diversity). Whale shark associated sets were intermediate between FAD and free school sets, with tuna catch (skipjack and juvenile yellowfin) closer to FAD than to free school sets. However, the presence of large yellowfin, the bycatch composition (with almost no finfish, abundantly captured in FAD sets) and the species assemblage showed similarity with free school sets. This study highlights the need for an EAFM in the tuna purse-seine fishery by providing knowledge on pelagic multi-specific catches and bycatches.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0960-3115 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2482  
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Auteur Sardenne, F.; Diaha, N.'G.C.; Amande, M.J.; Zudaire, I.; Couturier, L.I.E.; Metral, L.; Le Grand, F.; Bodin, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Seasonal habitat and length influence on the trophic niche of co-occurring tropical tunas in the eastern Atlantic Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci.  
  Volume 76 Numéro 1 Pages 69-80  
  Mots-Clés lipids; top predators; pacific-ocean; thunnus-albacares; stable-isotope analyses; western; vertical movements; bigeye tuna; vinciguerria-nimbaria; yellowfin tuna  
  Résumé In the Gulf of Guinea, bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus; BET) and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares; YFT) are an important part of commercial fisheries and play a prominent ecological role as top predators. Using fatty acid profiles and carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes, we examined their trophic niche partitioning in this understudied region. Trophic niche overlap was high (> 70%), similar to percentages in other ocean basins. BET occupied a higher trophic position than YFT and fed on deeper prey (high delta N-15 values and high proportions of monounsaturated fatty acids). The trophic position of YFT decreased slightly in the last 15 years (delta N-15 values decreased by similar to 0.5 parts per thousand), suggesting a change in epipelagic communities, as observed in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Ontogenic changes were limited to BET. For both species, the dietary proportion of the diatom marker 20:5(n-3) increased in the seasonal upwelling area, highlighting the influence of seasonal habitat on the diet of tuna. The relatively lipid-rich muscle (similar to 6% dry mass) of Atlantic tropical tuna suggests a richer diet in this region than that of Indian Ocean tropical tuna and (or) differences in energy allocation strategies.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0706-652x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2483  
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Auteur Rouyer, T.; Bonhommeau, S.; Giordano, N.; Ellul, S.; Ellul, G.; Deguara, S.; Wendling, B.; Belhaj, M.M.; Kerzerho, V.; Bernard, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Tagging Atlantic bluefin tuna from a farming cage: An attempt to reduce handling times for large scale deployments Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Research  
  Volume 211 Numéro Pages 27-31  
  Mots-Clés Electronic tagging; Farming cage; Large Atlantic bluefin tuna; Release  
  Résumé Our knowledge on the biology and ecology of marine species have improved greatly through the use of archival tags by enabling the collection on information from individual in the wild. This is specifically true for large pelagic species such as the Atlantic Bluefin tuna (ABFT, Thunnus thynnus) where, for the first time, it has been possible to confirm through fisheries-independent data, migration patterns, reproductive and feeding behaviours and habitat use. However, large-scale tagging experiments that would enable researchers to tackle group behaviour are difficult to set up. On the one hand, the impact of the actual tagging operation should be as minimal as possible to avoid any change in behaviour of the fish which could influence tag data analyses. On the other hand, large scale tagging experiments require handling a large number of animals in a relatively short period of time. In the present manuscript, a methodology for tagging several large ABFT with satellite tags was tested with ABFT caught from a cage of a Maltese farm. The total time of the operation, from the moment fish were caught by handline to release back to the sea lasted an average of 10 min for the 3 fish tagged. The handling of the fish on the deck lasted less than 2 min. This methodology proved successful at tagging several large (158–182 cm) fishes in a very short time, while ensuring the best conditions for the fish during tagging and subsequent release. This procedure requires substantial logistical preparation and an experienced crew team but, by reducing the time required for the operation, opens up the possibility of large scale tagging activities of large fish held in cages or caught by purse seiners.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2487  
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Auteur Bodin, N.; Chassot, E.; Sardenne, F.; Zudaire, I.; Grande, M.; Dhurmeea, Z.; Murua, H.; Barde, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Ecological data for western Indian Ocean tuna Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology  
  Volume 99 Numéro 5 Pages 1245-1245  
  Mots-Clés energetics; fatty acids; lipids; morphometrics; multi-tissues; proteins; stable isotopes; trophic ecology; tropical marine ecosystems; tuna fisheries  
  Résumé Tuna are marine apex predators that inhabit the tropical and sub-tropical waters of the Indian Ocean where they support socially and economically important fisheries. Key component of pelagic communities, tuna are bioindicator species of anthropogenic and climate-induced changes through modifications of the structure and related energy-flow of food webs and ecosystems. The IndianEcoTuna dataset provides a panel of ecological tracers measured in four soft tissues (white muscle, red muscle, liver, gonads) from 1,364 individuals of four species, i.e., the albacore (ALB, Thunnus alalunga), the bigeye (BET, T. obesus), the skipjack (SKJ, Katsuwomus pelamis), and the yellowfin (YFT, T. albacares), collected throughout the western Indian Ocean from 2009 to 2015. Sampling was carried out during routine monitoring programs, at sea by observers onboard professional vessels or at landing. For each record, the type of fishing gear, the conservation mode, as well as the fishing date and catch location are provided. Individuals were sampled to span a wide range of body sizes: 565 ALB with fork length from 58 to 118 cm, 155 BET from 29.5 to 173 cm, 304 SKJ from 30 to 74 cm, and 340 YFT from 29 to 171.5 cm. The IndianEcoTuna dataset combines: (1) 9,512 records of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (percent element weights, δ13C and δ15N values) in 1,185 fish, (2) 887 concentrations of total proteins in 242 fish, (3) 8,356 concentrations of total lipids and three lipid classes (triacylglycerols TAG; phospholipids PL; sterols ST) in 695 fish, and (4) 1,150 and 1,033 profiles of neutral and polar fatty acids in 397 and 342 fish, respectively. Information on sex and weights of the whole fish, gonads, liver and stomach is provided. Because of the essential trophic role and wide-ranging of tuna in marine systems, and the large panel of tropho-energetic tracers and derived-key quantitative parameters provided (e.g., niche width, trophic position, condition indices), the IndianEcoTuna dataset should be of high interest for global and regional research on marine trophic ecology and food web analysis, as well as on the impacts of anthropogenic changes on Indian Ocean marine ecosystems. There are no copyright restrictions for research and/or teaching purposes. Usage of the dataset must include citation of this Data Paper.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1939-9170 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2373  
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Auteur Darnaude, A.M.; Hunter, E. doi  openurl
  Titre Validation of otolith delta O-18 values as effective natural tags for shelf-scale geolocation of migrating fish Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 598 Numéro Pages 167-185  
  Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; carbon stable-isotopes; cod gadus-morhua; Fish migration; life-history; Natural tag; north-sea plaice; Oxygen; oxygen-isotope fractionation; Plaice; Pleuronectes platessa; pleuronectes-platessa l; population regulation; Site fidelity; Stable isotopes; stock structure; western-australia  
  Résumé The oxygen isotopic ratio of fish otoliths is increasingly used as a 'natural tag' to assess provenance in migratory species, with the assumption that variations in delta O-18 values closely reflect individual ambient experience of temperature and/or salinity. We employed archival tag data and otoliths collected from a shelf-scale study of the spatial dynamics of North Sea plaice Pleuronectes platessa L., to examine the limits of otolith delta O-18-based geolocation of fish during their annual migrations. Detailed intra-annual otolith delta O-18 measurements for 1997-1999 from individuals of 3 distinct sub-stocks with different spawning locations were compared with delta O-18 values predicted at the monthly, seasonal and annual scales, using predicted sub-stock specific temperatures and salinities over the same years. Spatio-temporal variation in expected delta O-18 values (-0.23 to 2.94%) mainly reflected variation in temperature, and among-zone discrimination potential using otolith delta O-18 varied greatly by temporal scale and by time of year. Measured otolith delta O-18 values (-0.71 to 3.09%) largely mirrored seasonally predicted values, but occasionally fell outside expected delta O-18 ranges. Where mismatches were observed, differences among sub-stocks were consistently greater than predicted, suggesting that in plaice, differential sub-stock growth rates and physiological effects during oxygen fractionation enhance geolocation potential using otolith delta O-18. Comparing intra-annual delta O-18 values over several consecutive years for individuals with contrasted migratory patterns corroborated a high degree of feeding and spawning site fidelity irrespective of the sub-stock. Informed interpretation of otolith delta O-18 values can therefore provide relatively detailed fisheries-relevant data not readily obtained by conventional means.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2377  
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