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Auteur Zudaire, I.; Murua, H.; Grande, M.; Pernet, F.; Bodin, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Accumulation and mobilization of lipids in relation to reproduction of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) in the Western Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Research  
  Volume Numéro Pages 50-59  
  Mots-Clés FADs; Fecundity; Income-capital breeder; Lipid class composition; Reproductive allocation strategy; Tropical tuna  
  Résumé Total lipid content and lipid class composition were analyzed in gonads, liver and white muscle of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) throughout ovary development to understand its reproductive allocation strategy and to assess the relation between female condition and reproduction. A total of 112 females were collected onboard purse-seiner in the Western Indian Ocean from January to March 2009, from June to July 2009, and from April to May 2010. Gonads were characterized by highly variable total lipid contents ranging from 5 to 27 μg mg−1 of wet weight (ww) with a predominance of neutral lipids, mainly triacylglycerols (TAG) and sterol- and wax-esters. The different lipid classes in gonads described an accumulative pattern through the maturity process from immature to hydration phase. Total lipid content in liver varied from 10 to 21 μg mg−1 ww, and serves as fuel for yellowfin tuna reproduction. TAG and phospholipid deposits became depleted as the ovary developed, suggesting a transfer of lipids directly from liver to the oocytes during vitellogenesis. In contrast, muscle total lipid content was low and constant throughout ovarian development (2.5–6 μg mg−1 ww). Hence, yellowfin tuna can be defined as an income-capital breeder species for which the cost of reproduction depends mainly on concurrent energy income from feeding and only little on stored lipids. Besides, no significant relationship between gonad lipid composition and fecundity was found in females able to spawn. Finally, the influence of yellowfin tuna aggregation behaviour on reproductive female condition has been investigated: gonad total lipid contents were higher in females caught in free-swimming schools than in females caught under fish aggregating devices (FADs). However, these results did not clarify whether the influence of FADs on associated yellowfin tuna affects their reproductive capacity.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Advances in Fisheries Research in Ibero-America Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection 160 Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1209  
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Auteur Dagorn, L.; Holland, K.N.; Restrepo, V.; Moreno, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Is it good or bad to fish with FADs? What are the real impacts of the use of drifting FADs on pelagic marine ecosystems? Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish And Fisheries  
  Volume 14 Numéro 3 Pages 391-415  
  Mots-Clés by-catch; ecological trap; Fad; purse seine; tuna  
  Résumé The use of fish aggregating devices (FADs) by purse seine fisheries has come under increasing criticism for its potential deleterious impacts on tuna stocks, for high levels of by-catch and threats to the biodiversity of tropical pelagic ecosystems. Here, we review the current state of scientific knowledge of this fishing technique and current management strategies. Our intent is to encourage objective discussion of the topic and highlight areas worthy of future research. We show that catching juvenile tuna around FADs does not necessarily result in overfishing of stocks, although more selective fishing techniques would likely help obtain higher yield. Levels of non-tuna by-catch are comparable to or less than in other commercial tuna fisheries and are primarily comprised of species that are not considered threatened. Accordingly, to minimize impacts on ecosystem balance, there is merit in considering that all species captured in purse seine fisheries (excluding vulnerable species such as turtles and sharks) should be retained, but the consequences of such a measure should be carefully examined before implementation. The take of vulnerable species could be further reduced by introduction of additional mitigation measures, but their potential benefits would be limited without parallel efforts with other gears. Finally, there is no unequivocal empirical evidence that FADs represent an ‘ecological trap’ that inherently disrupts tuna biology although further research should focus on this issue. We encourage RFMOs to expand and improve their FAD management plans. Under appropriate management regimes, FAD fishing could be an ecologically and economically sensible fishing method.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1467-2979 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 256  
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Auteur Dueri, S.; Maury, O. doi  openurl
  Titre Modelling the effect of marine protected areas on the population of skipjack tuna in the Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Living Resources  
  Volume 26 Numéro Pages 171-178  
  Mots-Clés Chagos MPA; fishery management; Fishery scenarios; marine reserves; null; Tropical tuna  
  Résumé The benefits of implementing no-take Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) for the conservation of highly migratory species are not easy to assess. They depend on several factors, such as the fish mobility, fisher behaviour and the area covered by the MPA with respect to the distribution area of the species to protect. In this study, we explore the simultaneous effects of MPAs and fishing scenarios on skipjack tuna population dynamics, using the spatially-explicit APECOSM-E model. The model represents the size-structured population dynamics of skipjack tuna in the Indian Ocean and their dependence on climatic variability and exploitation by fisheries. Numerical experiments were run from the beginning of industrial fisheries in the early 1980s to the year 2030, considering different scenarios for the future development of fisheries. These scenarios combined different trends in fishing effort and technological development, either assuming a continuous increase following historical trends or a stabilization of these factors at present values. The simulations were designed to explore the effects of two MPAs of different size and location: the recently established Chagos MPA, and a hypothetical MPA covering a large part of the Western Indian Ocean, where most of the skipjack catches are presently made. We modelled the redistribution of fishing effort around the MPAs assuming that the fishers had partial knowledge of the spatial distribution of the skipjack population. The effects of the two MPAs on the population dynamics, catch and fishing mortality are shown. Our results revealed a very minor effect of the Chagos MPA on the skipjack tuna population, while the Western Indian Ocean MPA had an important impact on the fishing mortality and succeeded in stabilizing the spawning population. The simulations also showed that the effect of an MPA depends on the evolution of fisheries and it is therefore important to explore different fishery scenarios to assess the future benefits of an MPA.  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 257  
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Auteur Sempo, G.; Dagorn, L.; Robert, M.; Deneubourg, J.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Impact of increasing deployment of artificial floating objects on the spatial distribution of social fish species Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Applied Ecology  
  Volume 50 Numéro 5 Pages 1081-1092  
  Mots-Clés behaviour-based modelling; Bycatch; Fad; Fob; sustainable fishery; tuna  
  Résumé * Approximately 300 pelagic fish species naturally aggregate around floating objects (FOBs) at the surface of the oceans. Currently, more than 50% of the world catch of tropical tuna comes from the industrial tuna fisheries around drifting FOBs. Greater understanding of the complex decision-making processes leading to this aggregation pattern and the impact of the massive release of artificial FOBs by fishermen on the spatial distribution and management of tuna is needed. * We analyse how the interplay between social (relationships between individuals) and non-social (responses to the environment) behaviours may affect the spatial distribution of a population in a multi-FOB environment. Taking the example of tropical tunas associating with FOBs and using differential equations and stochastic simulations, we examine how, when increasing the number of FOBs, fish aggregation dynamics and the distribution of the population among patches are affected by the population size, level of sociality and the natural retentive and/or attractive forces of FOBs on individual tuna. * Our model predicts that, depending on the species' level of sociality, fish will be scattered among FOBs or aggregated around a single FOB based on the number of FOBs deployed in a homogeneous oceanic region. * For social species, we demonstrated that the total fish catch is reduced with increasing FOBs number. Indeed, for each size of population, there are a number of FOBs minimizing the total population of fish associated with FOBs and another number of FOBs maximizing the total population of associated fish. * Synthesis and applications. In terms of fisheries management, the total catch volume is directly linked to the total number of floating objects (FOBs) for non-social species, and any limit on the number of sets would then result in a limit on the total catch. For social species (e.g. tuna), however, increasing the number of FOBs does not necessarily lead to an increase in the total catch, which is a non-intuitive result. Indeed, our model shows that, for specific values of the parameters, deploying a greater number of FOBs in the water (all other parameters being constant) does not necessarily help fishermen to catch more tuna, but does increase the level of fishing effort and bycatch.  
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  ISSN 1365-2664 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 265  
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Auteur Robert, M.; Dagorn, L.; Lopez, J.; Moreno, G.; Deneubourg, J.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Does social behavior influence the dynamics of aggregations formed by tropical tunas around floating objects ? An experimental approach Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology  
  Volume 440 Numéro Pages 238-243  
  Mots-Clés Aggregation; Binary choice; FADs; Social behavior; tuna  
  Résumé Tropical tunas associate with objects floating at the surface of the ocean, a behavior widely exploited by fishers. However, the respective roles played by environmental variables and behavioral processes (e.g., social behavior) in the formation of these aggregations remain elusive. To investigate the role of social behavior in the dynamics of such aggregations, we used the binary choice approach. The experimental design comprised two close and identical anchored fish aggregating devices (FADS) equipped with an echo sounder buoy to monitor the aggregated biomass of tuna under each device. Analysis of the results entailed characterizing whether the aggregated biomass is distributed asymmetrically (indicative of social behavior playing a role in the dynamics) or symmetrically between the two close and identical FADs, and comparing the results with theoretical distributions based on different definitions of basic units (individual fish or small schools). The results suggest that social interactions underlie aggregation processes, which represents a major advance in our understanding of these aggregations, a priority for science-based fishery management. While recognizing the logistical and technical constraints, we encourage the development of experimental studies (e.g., in which animals are presented with controlled situations) to enhance our understanding of the behavior of large pelagic fish.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 249  
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