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Auteur Briscoe, D.K.; Hobday, A.J.; Carlisle, A.; Scales, K.; Eveson, J.P.; Arrizabalaga, H.; Druon, J.N.; Fromentin, J.-M. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecological bridges and barriers in pelagic ecosystems Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.  
  Volume (down) 140 Numéro Pages 182-192  
  Mots-Clés arctic marine mammals; atlantic bluefin tuna; Billfish; Brazilian episode; climate-change; el-nino; interannual variation; Marine mammal; marlin makaira-nigricans; Migration corridors; Oceanographic features; population connectivity; satellite archival tags; sea-turtles; site fidelity; species distribution; thunnus-maccoyii; Tuna  
  Résumé Many highly mobile species are known to use persistent pathways or corridors to move between habitat patches in which conditions are favorable for particular activities, such as breeding or foraging. In the marine realm, environmental variability can lead to the development of temporary periods of anomalous oceanographic conditions that can connect individuals to areas of habitat outside a population's usual range, or alternatively, restrict individuals from areas usually within their range, thus acting as ecological bridges or ecological barriers. These temporary features can result in novel or irregular trophic interactions and changes in population spatial dynamics, and, therefore, may have significant implications for management of marine ecosystems. Here, we provide evidence of ecological bridges and barriers in different ocean regions, drawing upon five case studies in which particular oceanographic conditions have facilitated or restricted the movements of individuals from highly migratory species. We discuss the potential population-level significance of ecological bridges and barriers, with respect to the life history characteristics of different species, and inter- and intra-population variability in habitat use. Finally, we summarize the persistence of bridge dynamics with time, our ability to monitor bridges and barriers in a changing climate, and implications for forecasting future climate mediated ecosystem change.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2178  
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Auteur Arrizabalaga, H.; Dufour, F.; Kell, L.; Merino, G.; Ibaibarriaga, L.; Chust, G.; Irigoien, X.; Santiago, J.; Murua, H.; Fraile, I.; Chifflet, M.; Goikoetxea, N.; Sagarminaga, Y.; Aumont, O.; Bopp, L.; Herrera, M.; FROMENTIN, J.-M.; Bonhomeau, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Global habitat preferences of commercially valuable tuna Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography Revue Abrégée  
  Volume (down) 113 Numéro Pages 102-112  
  Mots-Clés Habitat; Tuna fisheries; Catch/ effort; Environmental conditions; Quotient analysis; Generalized Additive Models; Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management  
  Résumé In spite of its pivotal role in future implementations of the Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management, current knowledge about tuna habitat preferences remains fragmented and heterogeneous, because it relies mainly on regional or local studies that have used a variety of approaches making them difficult to combine. Therefore in this study we analyse data from six tuna species in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans in order to provide a global, comparative perspective of habitat preferences. These data are longline catch per unit effort from 1958 to2007 for albacore, Atlantic bluefin, southern bluefin, bigeye, yellowfin and skipjack tunas. Both quotient analysis and Generalized Additive Models were used to determine habitat preference with respect to eight biotic and abiotic variables. Results confirmed that, compared to temperate tunas, tropical tunas prefer warm, anoxic, stratified waters. Atlantic and southern bluefin tuna prefer higher concentrations of chlorophyll than the rest. The two species also tolerate most extreme sea surface height anomalies and highest mixed layer depths. In general, Atlantic bluefin tuna tolerates the widest range of environmental conditions. An assessment of the most important variables determining fish habitat is also provided.  
  Adresse Ifremer, UMR 212 EME, boulevard Jean Monnet, BP 171, Sete Cedex, 34203, France  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Elsevier BV Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ 31190 collection 981  
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Auteur Guillotreau, P.; Salladarre, F.; Dewals, P.; Dagorn, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Fishing tuna around Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) vs free swimming schools : skipper decision and other determining factors Type Article scientifique
  Année 2011 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Research  
  Volume (down) 109 Numéro 2-3 Pages 234-242  
  Mots-Clés Fish Aggregating Devices; Purse-seine; Skipper effect; tuna  
  Résumé Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) are increasingly used by tuna purse-seine fleets all around the world, modifying the species catch composition. We analyse the determinants of FAD vs free school (FS) fishing, including the skipper effect, and environmental and economic factors. A multivariate and econometric analysis of a panel dataset for the French purse-seine fleet in the Indian Ocean (1980-2007), complemented by a survey of fishers, demonstrates the influential role of climate and prey on FAD fishing and also emphasises individual skipper preference. However, we found that the major determinant of FAD fishing remains the growing fishing capacity (use of bigger vessels, satellite buoys, echo-sounders, supply vessels), thus modifying the species catch composition towards smaller tuna. Other things being equal, raising the proportion of FAD sets by 1% would increase the catches of skipjack by 1.3% and decrease those of large yellowfin tuna by 1.7%. This result shows that the control of effort and investment could be adapted through management measures to encourage one fishing method.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 143  
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Auteur NIEBLAS, A.-E.; DEMARCQ, H.; DRUSHKA, K.; SLOYAN, B.; BONHOMMEAU, S. url  openurl
  Titre Front variability and surface ocean features of the presumed southern bluefin tuna spawning grounds in the tropical southeast Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-sea Research Part II-topical Studies In Oceanography  
  Volume (down) 107 Numéro Pages 64-76  
  Mots-Clés Front detection index; Indo-Australian region; Oceanic fronts; Southern bluefin tuna Thunnus maccoyii; Spawning grounds (10 degrees S-20 degrees S 105 degrees E-125 degrees E); Tropical southeast Indian Ocean  
  Résumé The southern bluefin tuna (SBT, Thunnus maccoyii) is an ecologically and economically valuable fish. However, surprisingly little is known about its critical early life history, a period when mortality is several orders of magnitude higher than at any other life stage, and when larvae are highly sensitive to environmental conditions. Ocean fronts can be important in creating favourable spawning conditions, as they are a convergence of water masses with different properties that can concentrate planktonic particles and lead to enhanced productivity. In this study, we examine the front activity within the only region where SBT have been observed to spawn: the tropical southeast Indian Ocean between Indonesia and Australia (10 degrees S-20 degrees S, 105 degrees E-125 degrees E). We investigate front activity and its relationship to ocean dynamics and surface features of the region. Results are also presented for the entire Indian Ocean (30 degrees N-45 degrees S, 20 degrees E-140 degrees E) to provide a background context. We use an extension of the Cayula and Cornillon algorithm to detect ocean fronts from satellite images of sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll-a concentration (chl-a). Front occurrence represents the probability of occurrence of a front at each pixel of an image. Front intensity represents the magnitude of the difference between the two water masses that make up a front. Relative to the rest of the Indian Ocean, both SST and chl-a fronts in the offshore spawning region are persistent in occurrence and weak in intensity. Front occurrence and intensity along the Australian coast are high, with persistent and intense fronts found along the northwest and west coasts. Fronts in the tropical southeast Indian Ocean are shown to have strong annual variability and some moderate interannual variability. SST front occurrence is found to lead the Southern Oscillation Index by one year, potentially linked to warming and wind anomalies in the Indian Ocean. The surface ocean characteristics of the offshore SBT spawning region are found to be particularly stable compared to the rest of the Indian Ocean in terms of stable SST, low eddy kinetic energy, i.e., low mesoscale eddy activity, and low chl-a. However, this region has high front occurrence, but low front intensity of both SST and chl-a fronts. The potential impact of these oceanic features for SBT spawning is discussed.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1131  
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Auteur Dagorn, L.; Holland, K.N.; Filmalter, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Are drifting FADs essential for testing the ecological trap hypothesis ? Type Article scientifique
  Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Research  
  Volume (down) 106 Numéro Pages 60-63  
  Mots-Clés ecological; Fad; hypothesis; trap; Tunas  
  Résumé Because tropical tunas are known to aggregate around floating objects, it has been suggested that the large number of drifting fish aggregating devices (FADS) built and deployed by purse seiners could act as an 'ecological trap'. This hypothesis states that these networks of drifting FADS could take fish to areas where they would not normally go or retain them in places that they would otherwise leave. Because the ecological trap hypothesis was first advanced for drifting FADs, some have argued that only studies using drifting FADs can test this hypothesis. However, because working with drifting FADs is difficult, accepting this precept would preclude the scientific community from providing urgently needed information to organizations charged with management of fisheries that exploit drifting FADs. We argue that because both anchored and drifting FADs alter the natural environment, the more easily accessible anchored FADs can be used to test the ecological trap hypothesis. Also, based on a comparative scientific approach, we argue that understanding the behaviour of tunas around anchored FADs can improve our general understanding of tunas around all types of floating objects and help design new, well focused studies for drifting FADs. As anchored FADs are easier to access and offer a greater potential for research, we encourage scientists to design and conduct studies (in particular on the behaviour of fish at FADS) around the moored structures.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 66  
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