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Auteur Pecoraro, C.; Babbucci, M.; Villamor, A.; Franch, R.; Papetti, C.; Leroy, B.; Ortega-Garcia, S.; Muir, J.; Rooker, J.; Arocha, F.; Murua, H.; Zudaire, I.; Chassot, E.; Bodin, N.; Tinti, F.; Bargelloni, L.; Cariani, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Methodological assessment of 2b-RAD genotyping technique for population structure inferences in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Genomics  
  Volume 25 Numéro Pages 43-48  
  Mots-Clés Marine fish; Population genomics; RAD sequencing; Snp; Tropical tuna; Tuna fishery  
  Résumé Global population genetic structure of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) is still poorly understood despite its relevance for the tuna fishery industry. Low levels of genetic differentiation among oceans speak in favour of the existence of a single panmictic population worldwide of this highly migratory fish. However, recent studies indicated genetic structuring at a much smaller geographic scales than previously considered, pointing out that YFT population genetic structure has not been properly assessed so far. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time, the utility of 2b-RAD genotyping technique for investigating population genetic diversity and differentiation in high gene-flow species. Running de novo pipeline in Stacks, a total of 6772 high-quality genome-wide SNPs were identified across Atlantic, Indian and Pacific population samples representing all major distribution areas. Preliminary analyses showed shallow but significant population structure among oceans (FST = 0.0273; P-value < 0.01). Discriminant Analysis of Principal Components endorsed the presence of genetically discrete yellowfin tuna populations among three oceanic pools. Although such evidence needs to be corroborated by increasing sample size, these results showed the efficiency of this genotyping technique in assessing genetic divergence in a marine fish with high dispersal potential.  
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  ISSN 1874-7787 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1539  
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Auteur Mullon, C.; Guillotreau, P.; Galbraith, E.D.; Fortilus, J.; Chaboud, C.; Bopp, L.; Aumont, O.; Kaplan, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Exploring future scenarios for the global supply chain of tuna Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography  
  Volume 140 Numéro Pages 251-267  
  Mots-Clés climate change; Global supply chain; marine protected area; Scenarios; Tuna  
  Résumé The abundance of tuna, an important top predator that ranges throughout tropical and subtropical oceans, is now largely determined by fishing activity. Fishing activity, in turn, is determined by the interaction of fish availability, fishing capacity, fishing costs and global markets for tuna products. In the face of overfishing, the continued sustainable supply of tuna is likely to require improved global governance, that would benefit from modeling frameworks capable of integrating market forces with the availability of fish in order to consider alternative future projections. Here we describe such a modeling framework, in which we develop several simple, contrasting scenarios for the development of the tuna supply chain in order to illustrate the utility of the approach for global evaluation of management strategies for tuna and other complex, stock-structured fisheries. The model includes multiple national and multi-national fishing fleets, canneries and fresh/frozen markets, and connects these to global consumers using a network of flows. The model is calibrated using recent data on fish catch, cannery and fresh/frozen production, and consumption. Scenarios explore the control on future outcomes in the global tuna fishery by representing, in a simple way, the effects of (1) climate change, (2) changes in the global demand for tuna, and (3) changes in the access to fishing grounds (marine reserves). The results emphasize the potential importance of increasing demand in provoking a global collapse, and suggest that controlling tuna production by limiting technical efficiency is a potential countermeasure. Finally we discuss the outcomes in terms of potential extensions of the scenario approach allowed by this global network model of the tuna supply chain.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2098  
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Auteur Dueri, S.; Guillotreau, P.; Jiménez-Toribio, R.; Oliveros-Ramos, R.; Bopp, L.; Maury, O. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Food security or economic profitability? Projecting the effects of climate and socioeconomic changes on global skipjack tuna fisheries under three management strategies Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Environmental Change  
  Volume 41 Numéro Pages 1-12  
  Mots-Clés Bioeconomic model; climate change; fishery management; Mey; Msy; Skipjack tuna  
  Résumé We investigate the interactions between anthropogenic climate change, socioeconomic developments and tuna fishery management strategies. For this purpose, we use the APECOSM-E model to map the effects of climate change and commercial fishing on the distribution of skipjack tuna biomass in the three oceans, combined with a new bioeconomic module representing the rent or profit of skipjack fisheries. For forcing, we use Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5, the highest emission scenario for greenhouse gas concentrations presented in the IPCC’s Fifth Assessment Report (AR5), and the IPCC Socioeconomic Shared Pathway (SSP) 3, which is characterized by low economic development and a strong increase in the world population. We first investigate the impact of climate change on regional skipjack abundance, catches and profits in three oceans (Atlantic, Indian and Pacific) in 2010, 2050 and 2095. We then study the effects of three management strategies (maximum sustainable yield or MSY, maximum economic yield or MEY, and zero rent or ZR) on the future distribution of fishing fleets between oceans and on global economic rent. Our model projections for 2050 and 2095 show an increase in global skipjack biomass compared to 2010 and major changes in its distribution, impacting local and regional fishing efforts. The Pacific Ocean will continue to dominate the skipjack market. In our modeling of management strategies, the currently predominant MSY strategy would have been unprofitable in 2010, due to a decreased catch per unit effort (CPUE). In the future, however, technological developments should increase fishing efficiency and make MSY profitable. In all the scenarios, a MEY strategy is more profitable than MSY but leads to the lowest catches and the highest prices. This raises ethical questions in a world where food security may become a top priority. In the scenarios where MSY generates an economic loss (e.g. 2010), a ZR strategy allows global stocks to be exploited at high but still profitable levels. Conversely, in the scenarios where MSY is profitable, (e.g. 2095) ZR leads to overfishing and smaller global catches. We conclude that the most appropriate management strategy at any time is likely to change as environmental and socioeconomic conditions evolve. The decision to follow one or other strategy is a complex one that must be regularly reviewed and updated.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0959-3780 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1601  
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Auteur Fromentin, J.-M.; Bonhommeau, S.; Arrizabalaga, H.; Kell, L.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre The spectre of uncertainty in management of exploited fish stocks: The illustrative case of Atlantic bluefin tuna Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Policy  
  Volume 47 Numéro Pages 8-14  
  Mots-Clés tuna  
  Résumé  
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  ISSN 0308-597x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 323  
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Auteur Rouyer, T.; Bonhommeau, S.; Giordano, N.; Ellul, S.; Ellul, G.; Deguara, S.; Wendling, B.; Belhaj, M.M.; Kerzerho, V.; Bernard, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Tagging Atlantic bluefin tuna from a farming cage: An attempt to reduce handling times for large scale deployments Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Research  
  Volume 211 Numéro Pages 27-31  
  Mots-Clés Electronic tagging; Farming cage; Large Atlantic bluefin tuna; Release  
  Résumé Our knowledge on the biology and ecology of marine species have improved greatly through the use of archival tags by enabling the collection on information from individual in the wild. This is specifically true for large pelagic species such as the Atlantic Bluefin tuna (ABFT, Thunnus thynnus) where, for the first time, it has been possible to confirm through fisheries-independent data, migration patterns, reproductive and feeding behaviours and habitat use. However, large-scale tagging experiments that would enable researchers to tackle group behaviour are difficult to set up. On the one hand, the impact of the actual tagging operation should be as minimal as possible to avoid any change in behaviour of the fish which could influence tag data analyses. On the other hand, large scale tagging experiments require handling a large number of animals in a relatively short period of time. In the present manuscript, a methodology for tagging several large ABFT with satellite tags was tested with ABFT caught from a cage of a Maltese farm. The total time of the operation, from the moment fish were caught by handline to release back to the sea lasted an average of 10 min for the 3 fish tagged. The handling of the fish on the deck lasted less than 2 min. This methodology proved successful at tagging several large (158–182 cm) fishes in a very short time, while ensuring the best conditions for the fish during tagging and subsequent release. This procedure requires substantial logistical preparation and an experienced crew team but, by reducing the time required for the operation, opens up the possibility of large scale tagging activities of large fish held in cages or caught by purse seiners.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2487  
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