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Auteur Lucena Frédou, F.; Frédou, T.; Gaertner, D.; Kell, L.; Potier, M.; Bach, P.; Travassos, P.; Hazin, F.; Ménard, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Life history traits and fishery patterns of teleosts caught by the tuna longline fishery in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Research  
  Volume 179 Numéro Pages 308-321  
  Mots-Clés Bycatch; Fishing impact; Tuna; Billfish; Ecosystem based fisheries management  
  Résumé The identification and mitigation of adverse effects of the bycatch of tuna longline fishery have been mainly developed and implemented for seabirds, sharks and turtles and, the knowledge on teleost bycatch for this fishery, remains very poor. This paper contributes to a comprehensive assessment of life history traits and fishery attributes of target and bycatch species caught by the tuna longline fishery in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Data was compiled on seven life history traits and three fishery attributes for 33 and 27 teleost stocks caught by longliners in South Atlantic and Indian Oceans, respectively. In addition, each species was assigned into four categories describing the fate of the catch: target species for commercial use, bycatch species kept for consumption, bycatch species kept for commercial use and discarded bycatch. Life history traits and fishery attributes did not differ between oceans. However, non-target but commercialized species were smaller in the Atlantic Ocean. Teleosts caught by the tuna longline fishery was segregated into three main groups: (1) the fast growing species represented mainly by dolphinfishes (Coryphaena hippurus and C. equisellis), skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis), kawakawa (Euthynnus affinis), bullet tuna (Auxis rochei), snoek (Thyrsites atun) and blackfin tuna (Thunnus atlanticus); (2) target tunas and most other bycatch species which were part of an intermediate group and (3) billfishes including swordfish representing the large and slow growing species with moderate to high market values and unknown or highly uncertain stock status. Investment in some key life history traits (such as growth coefficient) and the development of quantitative or semi-quantitative approaches (stock assessment and Ecological Risk Assessment) should be priorized as precautionary management measures for these species.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2405  
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Auteur Zudaire, I.; Murua, H.; Grande, M.; Pernet, F.; Bodin, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Accumulation and mobilization of lipids in relation to reproduction of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) in the Western Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Research  
  Volume Numéro Pages 50-59  
  Mots-Clés FADs; Fecundity; Income-capital breeder; Lipid class composition; Reproductive allocation strategy; Tropical tuna  
  Résumé Total lipid content and lipid class composition were analyzed in gonads, liver and white muscle of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) throughout ovary development to understand its reproductive allocation strategy and to assess the relation between female condition and reproduction. A total of 112 females were collected onboard purse-seiner in the Western Indian Ocean from January to March 2009, from June to July 2009, and from April to May 2010. Gonads were characterized by highly variable total lipid contents ranging from 5 to 27 μg mg−1 of wet weight (ww) with a predominance of neutral lipids, mainly triacylglycerols (TAG) and sterol- and wax-esters. The different lipid classes in gonads described an accumulative pattern through the maturity process from immature to hydration phase. Total lipid content in liver varied from 10 to 21 μg mg−1 ww, and serves as fuel for yellowfin tuna reproduction. TAG and phospholipid deposits became depleted as the ovary developed, suggesting a transfer of lipids directly from liver to the oocytes during vitellogenesis. In contrast, muscle total lipid content was low and constant throughout ovarian development (2.5–6 μg mg−1 ww). Hence, yellowfin tuna can be defined as an income-capital breeder species for which the cost of reproduction depends mainly on concurrent energy income from feeding and only little on stored lipids. Besides, no significant relationship between gonad lipid composition and fecundity was found in females able to spawn. Finally, the influence of yellowfin tuna aggregation behaviour on reproductive female condition has been investigated: gonad total lipid contents were higher in females caught in free-swimming schools than in females caught under fish aggregating devices (FADs). However, these results did not clarify whether the influence of FADs on associated yellowfin tuna affects their reproductive capacity.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Advances in Fisheries Research in Ibero-America Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection 160 Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1209  
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Auteur Rouyer, T.; Fromentin, J.-M.; Ménard, F.; Cazelles, B.; Briand, K.; Pianet, R.; Planque, B.; Stenseth, N.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Complex interplays among population dynamics, environmental forcing, and exploitation in fisheries Type Article scientifique
  Année 2008 Publication Revue Abrégée Pnas  
  Volume 105 Numéro 14 Pages 5420-5425  
  Mots-Clés Atlantic tuna; North Atlantic Oscillation; time-series analysis  
  Résumé The patterns of variations in fisheries time series are known to result from a complex combination of species and fisheries dynamics all coupled with environmental forcing (including climate, trophic interactions, etc.). Disentangling the relative effects of these factors has been a major goal of fisheries science for both conceptual and management reasons. By examining the variability of 169 tuna and billfish time series of catch and catch per unit effort (CPUE) throughout the Atlantic as well as their linkage to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), we find that the importance of these factors differed according to the spatial scale. At the scale of the entire Atlantic the patterns of variations are primarily spatially structured, whereas at a more regional scale the patterns of variations were primarily related to the fishing gear. Furthermore, the NAO appeared to also structure the patterns of variations of tuna time series, especially over the North Atlantic. We conclude that the patterns of variations in fisheries time series of tuna and billfish only poorly reflect the underlying dynamics of these fish populations; they appear to be shaped by several successive embedded processes, each interacting with each other. Our results emphasize the necessity for scientific data when investigating the population dynamics of large pelagic fishes, because CPUE fluctuations are not directly attributable to change in species' abundance.  
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  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424, 1091-6490 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1669  
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Auteur Walker, E.; Rivoirard, J.; Gaspar, P.; Bez, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre From forager tracks to prey distributions: an application to tuna vessel monitoring systems (VMS) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Ecological Applications Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 25 Numéro 3 Pages 826-833  
  Mots-Clés Gps; multivariate geostatistics; presence index; spatiotemporal distribution; trajectometry; Tropical tuna; vessel monitoring system (VMS)  
  Résumé In the open ocean, movements of migratory fish populations are typically surveyed using tagging methods that are subject to low sample sizes for archive tags, except for a few notable examples, and poor temporal resolution for conventional tags. Alternatively, one can infer patterns of movement of migratory fish by tracking movements of their predators, i.e., fishing vessels, whose navigational systems (e.g., GPS) provide accurate and frequent VMS (vessel monitoring system) records of movement in pursuit of prey. In this paper, we develop a state-space model that infers the foraging activities of fishing vessels from their tracks. Second, we link foraging activities to probabilities of tuna presence. Finally, using multivariate geostatistical interpolation (cokriging) we map the probability of tuna presence together with their estimation variances and produce a time series of indices of abundance. While the segmentation of the trajectories is validated by observers' data, the present VMS-index is compared to catch rate and proved to be useful for management perspectives. The approach reported in this manuscript extends beyond the case study considered. It can be applied to any foragers that engage in an attempt of capture when they see prey and for whom this attempt is linked to a tractable change in behavior.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1116  
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Auteur Gaertner, D.; Hallier, J.-P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Tag shedding by tropical tunas in the Indian Ocean and other factors affecting the shedding rate Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Fisheries Research Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 163 Numéro Si Pages 98-105  
  Mots-Clés averaging; Bayesian model; Beta-binomial model; Indian Ocean; Shedding rate; Tagging data; Tropical tunas  
  Résumé A key objective of the Regional Tuna Tagging Project Indian Ocean was to estimate tag-shedding rates, Type-I (immediate tag shedding) and Type-II (long-term tag shedding). To assess this, a series of double-tagging experiments (26,899 double tags released with 4555 recoveries) were conducted as part of the broader tagging program. After omitting data from tags placed by less experienced taggers, the results of our analyses did not show any evidence that individual differences between taggers (i.e., a tagger effect) impacted estimates of tag-shedding rates. However, it was shown that the probability of retaining the second tag (inserted in the left side of the fish) was larger than retaining the first tag (inserted in the right side, i.e., the side typically tagged in single-tagging experiments). We used a Bayesian model averaging approach to account for model uncertainty in the estimates of the parameters a and L used to calculate the probability of tag retention Q(t)= alpha e-((L t)) for the right tag. The parameter estimates were alpha = 0.993 and L (per year) = 0.030 (skipjack); alpha = 0.972 and L (per year) = 0.040 (yellowfin); and alpha = 0.990 and L (per year) = 0.021 (bigeye). These results agree with estimates obtained by other large-scale tropical tuna tagging projects. We showed that tag loss has a moderate impact on the underestimation of the exploitation rate (bias = 2-6% depending on the tuna species). However, non-reporting leads to a bias of around 7% when using the high reporting rate estimate of purse seiners. Finally, tag shedding (specifically Type-II shedding) modified the individual weights of the samples of recaptures. Consequently, the total instantaneous mortality estimates (Z; calculated from mean times-at-large) were reduced by a range of 1-3%.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur Murua, H.; Marsac, F.; Eveson, J.P.  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1104  
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