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Auteur Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Albouy, C.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecological traits shape genetic diversity patterns across the Mediterranean Sea: a quantitative review on fishes Type (up) Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 43 Numéro 4 Pages 845-857  
  Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; bass dicentrarchus-labrax; climate-change; cod gadus-morhua; ecological traits; effective population-size; genetic diversity; gilthead sea; life-history traits; marine fishes; marine populations; Mediterranean Sea; microsatellite markers; microsatellites; mitochondrial; mitochondrial DNA; molecular markers; population genetics  
  Résumé AimWe set out to identify the determinants of the variation in genetic diversity among fish species and test whether multi-species genetic diversity is randomly distributed in space. LocationMediterranean Sea. MethodsWe collected genetic diversity data from 39 published studies on Mediterranean fishes (31 species) along with the spatial coordinates of the sampling sites. We focused on microsatellite heterozygosity (151 data points) and mitochondrial haplotype diversity (201 data points). We used linear regressions to link genetic diversity and 11 ecological traits. We also tested for spatial autocorrelation and trends in the residuals. ResultsAmong-species variation in microsatellite heterozygosity was explained by three ecological traits: vertical distribution, migration type and body length. Variation in mitochondrial haplotype diversity was also explained by vertical distribution and migration type, and by reproductive strategy (semelparity). However, vertical distribution and migration type showed opposite effects on microsatellites and mitochondrial diversity. After accounting for the effects of ecological traits, no spatial pattern was detected, except for one of the species considered. Main conclusionsEcological factors explain an important proportion of the among-species genetic diversity. These results suggest that life history strategies of the species influence the variation of microsatellite diversity indirectly through their effect on effective population size, while the spatial variations of genetic diversity seem to be too complex to be identified in our analysis. We found very different effects of traits on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA diversity, which can be explained by the specificities of mitochondrial DNA (absence of recombination, maternal inheritance and non-neutrality).  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1627  
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Auteur Walker, E.; Rivoirard, J.; Gaspar, P.; Bez, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre From forager tracks to prey distributions: an application to tuna vessel monitoring systems (VMS) Type (up) Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Ecological Applications Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 25 Numéro 3 Pages 826-833  
  Mots-Clés Gps; multivariate geostatistics; presence index; spatiotemporal distribution; trajectometry; Tropical tuna; vessel monitoring system (VMS)  
  Résumé In the open ocean, movements of migratory fish populations are typically surveyed using tagging methods that are subject to low sample sizes for archive tags, except for a few notable examples, and poor temporal resolution for conventional tags. Alternatively, one can infer patterns of movement of migratory fish by tracking movements of their predators, i.e., fishing vessels, whose navigational systems (e.g., GPS) provide accurate and frequent VMS (vessel monitoring system) records of movement in pursuit of prey. In this paper, we develop a state-space model that infers the foraging activities of fishing vessels from their tracks. Second, we link foraging activities to probabilities of tuna presence. Finally, using multivariate geostatistical interpolation (cokriging) we map the probability of tuna presence together with their estimation variances and produce a time series of indices of abundance. While the segmentation of the trajectories is validated by observers' data, the present VMS-index is compared to catch rate and proved to be useful for management perspectives. The approach reported in this manuscript extends beyond the case study considered. It can be applied to any foragers that engage in an attempt of capture when they see prey and for whom this attempt is linked to a tractable change in behavior.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1116  
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Auteur Filmalter, J.D.; Cowley, P.D.; Potier, M.; Menard, F.; Smale, M.J.; Cherel, Y.; Dagorn, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Feeding ecology of silky sharks Carcharhinus falciformis associated with floating objects in the western Indian Ocean Type (up) Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Fish Biol.  
  Volume 90 Numéro 4 Pages 1321-1337  
  Mots-Clés atlantic; By-catch; diet; ecosystem; fad; fish aggregating devices; fish aggregation device; food-consumption; isurus-oxyrinchus; pacific-ocean; pelagic fishes; Pelagic shark; Purse-seine fishery; shortfin mako; Yellowfin tuna  
  Résumé The silky shark Carcharhinus falciformis is commonly associated with floating objects, including fish aggregating devices (FADs), in the Indian Ocean. While the motives for this associative behaviour are unclear, it does make them vulnerable to capture in the tuna purse seine fishery that makes extensive use of FADs. Here, the diet of 323 C. falciformis, caught at FADs in the Indian Ocean, was investigated to test the hypothesis that trophic benefits explain the associative behaviour. A high proportion of stomachs with fresh contents (57%) suggested that extensive feeding activity occurred while associated with FADs. Multiple dietary indices showed that typical non-associative prey types dominated, but were supplemented with fishes typically found at FADs. While the trophic benefits of FAD association may be substantial, our results suggest that associative behaviour is not driven solely by feeding. (C) 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2142  
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Auteur Díez, G.; Moreno, G.; Galaz, T.; Dagorn, L.; Murua, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Digestive activity and stomach temperature in farmed bluefin tuna Thunnus thynnus measured by acoustic tag Type (up) Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée J Fish Biol  
  Volume 90 Numéro 6 Pages 2504-2511  
  Mots-Clés acoustic; Bluefin tuna; digestion; farm; tag; Temperature  
  Résumé Eight farmed Atlantic bluefin tuna Thunnus thynnus were tagged with temperature and depth transmitters inserted in chub mackerels Scomber colias to characterize their digestive activity, feeding physiology and behaviour in captivity. Results obtained in the experiment can be used to optimize daily T. thynnus feeding strategy in farms, reducing the early regurgitation of food and thus the environmental effects of inappropriate feeding practices.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1095-8649 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2145  
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Auteur Rabearisoa, N.; Sabarros, P. S.; Romanov, E. V.; Lucas, V.; Bach, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Toothed whale and shark depredation indicators: A case study from the Reunion Island and Seychelles pelagic longline fisheries Type (up) Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée PLOS ONE  
  Volume 13 Numéro 8 Pages e0202037  
  Mots-Clés Indian Ocean; Seychelles; Sharks; Tuna; Fisheries; Economics; Killer whales; Whales  
  Résumé Depredation in marine ecosystems is defined as the damage or removal of fish or bait from fishing gear by predators. Depredation raises concerns about the conservation of species involved, fisheries yield and profitability, and reference points based on stock assessment of depredated species. Therefore, the development of accurate indicators to assess the impact of depredation is needed. Both the Reunion Island and the Seychelles archipelago pelagic longline fisheries targeting swordfish (Xiphias gladius) and tuna (Thunnus spp.) are affected by depredation from toothed whales and pelagic sharks. In this study, we used fishery data collected between 2004 and 2015 to propose depredation indicators and to assess depredation levels in both fisheries. For both fisheries, the interaction rate (depredation occurrence) was significantly higher for shark compared to toothed whale depredation. However, when depredation occurred, toothed whale depredation impact was significantly higher than shark depredation impact, with higher depredation per unit effort (number of fish depredated per 1000 hooks) and damage rate (proportion of fish depredated per depredated set). The gross depredation rate in the Seychelles was 18.3%. A slight increase of the gross depredation rate was observed for the Reunion Island longline fleet from 2011 (4.1% in 2007–2010 and 4.4% in 2011–2015). Economic losses due to depredation were estimated by using these indicators and published official statistics. A loss of 0.09 EUR/hook due to depredation was estimated for the Reunion Island longline fleet, and 0.86 EUR/hook for the Seychelles. These results suggest a southward decreasing toothed whale and shark depredation gradient in the southwest Indian Ocean. Seychelles depredation levels are among the highest observed in the world revealing this area as a “hotspot” of interaction between pelagic longline fisheries and toothed whales. This study also highlights the need for a set of depredation indicators to allow for a global comparison of depredation rates among various fishing grounds worldwide.  
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  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2401  
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