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Auteur Keller, S.; Quetglas, A.; Puerta, P.; Bitetto, I.; Casciaro, L.; Cuccu, D.; Esteban, A.; Garcia, C.; Garofalo, G.; Guijarro, B.; Josephides, M.; Jadaud, A.; Lefkaditou, E.; Maiorano, P.; Manfredi, C.; Marceta, B.; Micallef, R.; Peristeraki, P.; Relini, G.; Sartor, P.; Spedicato, M.T.; Tserpes, G.; Hidalgo, M. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Environmentally driven synchronies of Mediterranean cephalopod populations Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Prog. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 152 Numéro Pages 1-14  
  Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; balearic sea; Cephalopods; Dynamic factor analysis; ecological niche approach; fisheries; fluctuations; hake merluccius-merluccius; Illex coindetii; life-history; Mediterranean; medits; octopus; Octopus vulgaris; squid; Synchrony; time-series  
  Résumé The Mediterranean Sea is characterized by large scale gradients of temperature, productivity and salinity, in addition to pronounced mesoscale differences. Such a heterogeneous system is expected to shape the population dynamics of marine species. On the other hand, prevailing environmental and climatic conditions at whole basin scale may force spatially distant populations to fluctuate in synchrony. Cephalopods are excellent case studies to test these hypotheses owing to their high sensitivity to environmental conditions. Data of two cephalopod species with contrasting life histories (benthic octopus vs nectobenthic squid), obtained from scientific surveys carried out throughout the Mediterranean during the last 20 years were analyzed. The objectives of this study and the methods used to achieve them (in parentheses) were: (i) to investigate synchronies in spatially separated populations (decorrelation analysis); (ii) detect underlying common abundance trends over distant regions (dynamic factor analysis, DFA); and (iii) analyse putative influences of key environmental drivers such as productivity and sea surface temperature on the population dynamics at regional scale (general linear models, GLM). In accordance with their contrasting spatial mobility, the distance from where synchrony could no longer be detected (decorrelation scale) was higher in squid than in octopus (349 vs 217 km); for comparison, the maximum distance between locations was 2620 km. The DFA revealed a general increasing trend in the abundance of both species in most areas, which agrees with the already reported worldwide proliferation of cephalopods. DFA results also showed that population dynamics are more similar in the eastern than in the western Mediterranean basin. According to the GLM models, cephalopod populations were negatively affected by productivity, which would be explained by an increase of competition and predation by fishes. While warmer years coincided with declining octopus numbers, areas of high sea surface temperature showed higher densities of squid. Our results are relevant for regional fisheries management and demonstrate that the regionalisation objectives envisaged under the new Common Fishery Policy may not be adequate for Mediterranean cephalopod stocks. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2132  
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Auteur Gaertner, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Estimates of historic changes in total mortality and selectivity for Eastern Atlantic skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis) from length composition data Type Article scientifique
  Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Living Resources  
  Volume 23 Numéro Pages 3-11  
  Mots-Clés analysis; Bayesian; change-point; Fad; Fishing; Mortality; rate; Skipjack; strategies; tuna  
  Résumé Catch-at-size data of the eastern Atlantic skipjack were used to estimate changes in total mortality from 1969 to 2007. We used a transitional model of mean length that generalized the Beverton-Holt mortality estimator to allow change in mortality rate under nonequilibrium conditions. Then, from homogeneous periods of time, length-converted catch curves were used to access qualitative changes in selectivity patterns for two surface fisheries (the baitboat fishery operating from Dakar, Senegal, and the European and associated purse seine fisheries). To explore the impact of catch on the mortality rate, a Bayesian change-point analysis was conducted on the catch time series to detect concomitant variation between mortality rates and catch. Finally, potential causes of these changes are discussed in relation to the implementation of new fishing technology, such fish aggregating devices (FAD). The general pattern depicted by total mortality is in agreement with previous knowledge on this fishery: a state of complete or practically complete exploitation during the nineties followed by the decrease in nominal purse seine fishing effort in the last decade, combined with the effect of a seasonal moratorium on FAD fishing operations. There was no evidence of a change in selectivity between the two contrasted periods of time considered: 1969-1979 and 1986-1999; the second period being characterized by the introduction of new technology onboard vessels. In contrast, the covariation over time between total catch and mortality rate three years later highlights the effect of the fishing pressure on the stock of eastern Atlantic skipjack.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0990-7440 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 74  
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Auteur Mullon, C.; Guillotreau, P.; Galbraith, E.D.; Fortilus, J.; Chaboud, C.; Bopp, L.; Aumont, O.; Kaplan, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Exploring future scenarios for the global supply chain of tuna Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography  
  Volume 140 Numéro Pages 251-267  
  Mots-Clés climate change; Global supply chain; marine protected area; Scenarios; Tuna  
  Résumé The abundance of tuna, an important top predator that ranges throughout tropical and subtropical oceans, is now largely determined by fishing activity. Fishing activity, in turn, is determined by the interaction of fish availability, fishing capacity, fishing costs and global markets for tuna products. In the face of overfishing, the continued sustainable supply of tuna is likely to require improved global governance, that would benefit from modeling frameworks capable of integrating market forces with the availability of fish in order to consider alternative future projections. Here we describe such a modeling framework, in which we develop several simple, contrasting scenarios for the development of the tuna supply chain in order to illustrate the utility of the approach for global evaluation of management strategies for tuna and other complex, stock-structured fisheries. The model includes multiple national and multi-national fishing fleets, canneries and fresh/frozen markets, and connects these to global consumers using a network of flows. The model is calibrated using recent data on fish catch, cannery and fresh/frozen production, and consumption. Scenarios explore the control on future outcomes in the global tuna fishery by representing, in a simple way, the effects of (1) climate change, (2) changes in the global demand for tuna, and (3) changes in the access to fishing grounds (marine reserves). The results emphasize the potential importance of increasing demand in provoking a global collapse, and suggest that controlling tuna production by limiting technical efficiency is a potential countermeasure. Finally we discuss the outcomes in terms of potential extensions of the scenario approach allowed by this global network model of the tuna supply chain.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
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  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2098  
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Auteur Filmalter, J.D.; Cowley, P.D.; Potier, M.; Menard, F.; Smale, M.J.; Cherel, Y.; Dagorn, L. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Feeding ecology of silky sharks Carcharhinus falciformis associated with floating objects in the western Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Fish Biol.  
  Volume 90 Numéro 4 Pages 1321-1337  
  Mots-Clés atlantic; By-catch; diet; ecosystem; fad; fish aggregating devices; fish aggregation device; food-consumption; isurus-oxyrinchus; pacific-ocean; pelagic fishes; Pelagic shark; Purse-seine fishery; shortfin mako; Yellowfin tuna  
  Résumé The silky shark Carcharhinus falciformis is commonly associated with floating objects, including fish aggregating devices (FADs), in the Indian Ocean. While the motives for this associative behaviour are unclear, it does make them vulnerable to capture in the tuna purse seine fishery that makes extensive use of FADs. Here, the diet of 323 C. falciformis, caught at FADs in the Indian Ocean, was investigated to test the hypothesis that trophic benefits explain the associative behaviour. A high proportion of stomachs with fresh contents (57%) suggested that extensive feeding activity occurred while associated with FADs. Multiple dietary indices showed that typical non-associative prey types dominated, but were supplemented with fishes typically found at FADs. While the trophic benefits of FAD association may be substantial, our results suggest that associative behaviour is not driven solely by feeding. (C) 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2142  
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Auteur Navarro, J.; Saez-Liante, R.; Albo-Puigserver, M.; Coll, M.; Palomera, I. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Feeding strategies and ecological roles of three predatory pelagic fish in the western Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 140 Numéro Pages 9-17  
  Mots-Clés diet; ecosystem structure; iberian peninsula; indian-ocean; isotope ratios; Marine predators; Pelagic ecosystem; Stable isotopes; stable-isotopes; Stomach contents; swordfish; top predators; Trophic ecology; trophic level; xiphias-gladius; Yellowfin tuna  
  Résumé Knowing the feeding ecology of marine predators is pivotal to developing an understanding of their ecological role in the ecosystem and determining the trophic relationships between them. Despite the ecological importance of predatory pelagic fish species, research on these species in the Mediterranean Sea is limited. Here, by combining analyses of stomach contents and stable isotope values, we examined the feeding strategies of swordfish, Xiphias gladius, little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus and Atlantic bonito, Sarda sarda, in the western Mediterranean Sea. We also compared the trophic niche and trophic level of these species with published information of other sympatric pelagic predators present in the ecosystem. Results indicated that, although the diet of the three species was composed mainly by fin-fish species, a clear segregation in their main feeding strategies was found. Swordfish showed a generalist diet including demersal species such as blue whiting, Micromesistius poutassou, and European hake, Merluccius merluccius, and pelagic fin-fish such as barracudina species (Arctozenus risso and Lestidiops jayakari) or small pelagic fish species. Little tunny and Atlantic bonito were segregated isotopically between them and showed a diet basically composed of anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, and round sardinella, Sardinella aurita, and sardines, Sardina pilchardus, respectively. This trophic segregation, in addition to potential segregation by depth, is likely a mechanism that allows their potential coexistence within the same pelagic habitat. When the trophic position of these three predatory pelagic fish species is compared with other pelagic predators such as bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, and dolphinfish, Coryphaena hippurus, present in the western Mediterranean Sea, we found that they show similar intermediate trophic position in the ecosystem. In conclusion, the combined stomach and isotopic results highlight, especially for little tunny and Atlantic bonito, the trophic importance of Clupeoid species in their diet. In addition, the importance of demersal resources for swordfish provides evidence for the pelagic-demersal coupling of the ecosystem and the need to manage marine resources in an integrated way. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2175  
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