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Auteur Dueri, S.; Maury, O.
Titre (up) Modelling the effect of marine protected areas on the population of skipjack tuna in the Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Living Resources
Volume 26 Numéro Pages 171-178
Mots-Clés Chagos MPA; fishery management; Fishery scenarios; marine reserves; null; Tropical tuna
Résumé The benefits of implementing no-take Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) for the conservation of highly migratory species are not easy to assess. They depend on several factors, such as the fish mobility, fisher behaviour and the area covered by the MPA with respect to the distribution area of the species to protect. In this study, we explore the simultaneous effects of MPAs and fishing scenarios on skipjack tuna population dynamics, using the spatially-explicit APECOSM-E model. The model represents the size-structured population dynamics of skipjack tuna in the Indian Ocean and their dependence on climatic variability and exploitation by fisheries. Numerical experiments were run from the beginning of industrial fisheries in the early 1980s to the year 2030, considering different scenarios for the future development of fisheries. These scenarios combined different trends in fishing effort and technological development, either assuming a continuous increase following historical trends or a stabilization of these factors at present values. The simulations were designed to explore the effects of two MPAs of different size and location: the recently established Chagos MPA, and a hypothetical MPA covering a large part of the Western Indian Ocean, where most of the skipjack catches are presently made. We modelled the redistribution of fishing effort around the MPAs assuming that the fishers had partial knowledge of the spatial distribution of the skipjack population. The effects of the two MPAs on the population dynamics, catch and fishing mortality are shown. Our results revealed a very minor effect of the Chagos MPA on the skipjack tuna population, while the Western Indian Ocean MPA had an important impact on the fishing mortality and succeeded in stabilizing the spawning population. The simulations also showed that the effect of an MPA depends on the evolution of fisheries and it is therefore important to explore different fishery scenarios to assess the future benefits of an MPA.
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Auteur Lefevre, S.; Mckenzie, D.J.; Nilsson, G.E.
Titre (up) Models projecting the fate of fish populations under climate change need to be based on valid physiological mechanisms Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.
Volume 23 Numéro 9 Pages 3449-3459
Mots-Clés aerobic scope; coryphaena-hippurus; energy-demand teleosts; gadus-morhua l; gill surface area; growth; makaira-nigricans; marlin tetrapturus-albidus; metabolism; metabolism-size relationship; oxygen consumption; oxygen-consumption; ram ventilation; Respiration; scaling; swimming performance; tuna katsuwonus-pelamis
Résumé Some recent modelling papers projecting smaller fish sizes and catches in a warmer future are based on erroneous assumptions regarding (i) the scaling of gills with body mass and (ii) the energetic cost of 'maintenance'. Assumption (i) posits that insurmountable geometric constraints prevent respiratory surface areas from growing as fast as body volume. It is argued that these constraints explain allometric scaling of energy metabolism, whereby larger fishes have relatively lower mass-specific metabolic rates. Assumption (ii) concludes that when fishes reach a certain size, basal oxygen demands will not be met, because of assumption (i). We here demonstrate unequivocally, by applying accepted physiological principles with reference to the existing literature, that these assumptions are not valid. Gills are folded surfaces, where the scaling of surface area to volume is not constrained by spherical geometry. The gill surface area can, in fact, increase linearly in proportion to gill volume and body mass. We cite the large body of evidence demonstrating that respiratory surface areas in fishes reflect metabolic needs, not vice versa, which explains the large interspecific variation in scaling of gill surface areas. Finally, we point out that future studies basing their predictions on models should incorporate factors for scaling of metabolic rate and for temperature effects on metabolism, which agree with measured values, and should account for interspecific variation in scaling and temperature effects. It is possible that some fishes will become smaller in the future, but to make reliable predictions the underlying mechanisms need to be identified and sought elsewhere than in geometric constraints on gill surface area. Furthermore, to ensure that useful information is conveyed to the public and policymakers about the possible effects of climate change, it is necessary to improve communication and congruity between fish physiologists and fisheries scientists.
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ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2169
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Auteur Govinden, R.; Jauhary, R.; Filmalter, J.; Forget, F.; Soria, M.; Adam, S.; Dagorn, L.
Titre (up) Movement Behaviour of Skipjack (Katsuwonus Pelamis) and Yellowfin (Thunnus Albacares) Tuna at Anchored Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) in the Maldives, Investigated by Acoustic Telemetry Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Living Resources
Volume FirstView Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés Behaviour; Fish Aggregating Devices; Indian Ocean; Passive acoustic telemetry; skipjack tuna; Yellowfin tuna
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 193
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Auteur Capello, M.; Deneubourg, J.L.; Robert, M.; Holland, K.N.; Schaefer, K.M.; Dagorn, L.
Titre (up) Population assessment of tropical tuna based on their associative behavior around floating objects Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep
Volume 6 Numéro Pages 36415
Mots-Clés abundance; aerial surveys; archival tag data; bluefin tuna; continental-shelf; fish aggregating devices; katsuwonus-pelamis; pacific-ocean; tagging data; thunnus-albacares
Résumé Estimating the abundance of pelagic fish species is a challenging task, due to their vast and remote habitat. Despite the development of satellite, archival and acoustic tagging techniques that allow the tracking of marine animals in their natural environments, these technologies have so far been underutilized in developing abundance estimations. We developed a new method for estimating the abundance of tropical tuna that employs these technologies and exploits the aggregative behavior of tuna around floating objects (FADs). We provided estimates of abundance indices based on a simulated set of tagged fish and studied the sensitivity of our method to different association dynamics, FAD numbers, population sizes and heterogeneities of the FAD-array. Taking the case study of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) acoustically-tagged in Hawaii, we implemented our approach on field data and derived for the first time the ratio between the associated and the total population. With more extensive and long-term monitoring of FAD-associated tunas and good estimates of the numbers of fish at FADs, our method could provide fisheries-independent estimates of populations of tropical tuna. The same approach can be applied to obtain population assessments for any marine and terrestrial species that display associative behavior and from which behavioral data have been acquired using acoustic, archival or satellite tags.
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ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1682
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Auteur Escalle, L.; Murua, H.; Amande, J.M.; Arregui, I.; Chavance, P.; Delgado de Molina, A.; Gaertner, D.; Fraile, I.; Filmalter, J.D.; Santiago, J.; Forget, F.; Arrizabalaga, H.; Dagorn, L.; Mérigot, B.
Titre (up) Post-capture survival of whale sharks encircled in tuna purse-seine nets: tagging and safe release methods Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Conserv: Mar. Freshw. Ecosyst.
Volume 25 Numéro 4 Pages 433-447
Mots-Clés mega fauna; post-release mortality; Psat; Rhincodon typus; tropical tuna purse-seine
Résumé 1. Whale shark, the world's largest fish, is believed to be particularly vulnerable owing to its biological characteristics (slow growth, late maturation, great longevity) and is listed as Vulnerable by IUCN and included in Appendix II of CITES. 2. Whale sharks are occasionally encircled in tropical tuna purse-seine nets, throughout this global fishery. Although apparent immediate survival rates following encirclement and release have recently been assessed through scientific onboard observer programmes, a more rigorous methodology is still required for studying post-released survival. 3. This work provides a method for applying pop-up satellite tags and reports an enhanced release procedure for whale sharks. The first assessment of survival after release from purse-seine nets involved six whale sharks tagged between May and September 2014 in the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean. Five tags transmitted data: three popped up as programmed (after 30 days), while two surfaced prematurely (one after 21 and the other after 71 days (programmed to pop off after 30 and 90 days, respectively)) but showed no sign of unusual behaviour. 4. Overall, whale sharks survived at least 21 days (one at least 71 days) after release from purse-seine nets. These observations based on five large individuals (total length > 8 m), suggest that whale sharks have a good chance of survival when released with the proposed method. 5. Additional tagging in this and other oceans, especially of juveniles which may be more sensitive to encirclement and release operations, is essential to further assess whale shark post-release survival rates in tuna purse-seine fisheries. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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ISSN 1099-0755 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1547
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