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Auteur Rouyer, T.; Fromentin, J.-M.; Ménard, F.; Cazelles, B.; Briand, K.; Pianet, R.; Planque, B.; Stenseth, N.C.
Titre (up) Complex interplays among population dynamics, environmental forcing, and exploitation in fisheries Type Article scientifique
Année 2008 Publication Revue Abrégée Pnas
Volume 105 Numéro 14 Pages 5420-5425
Mots-Clés Atlantic tuna; North Atlantic Oscillation; time-series analysis
Résumé The patterns of variations in fisheries time series are known to result from a complex combination of species and fisheries dynamics all coupled with environmental forcing (including climate, trophic interactions, etc.). Disentangling the relative effects of these factors has been a major goal of fisheries science for both conceptual and management reasons. By examining the variability of 169 tuna and billfish time series of catch and catch per unit effort (CPUE) throughout the Atlantic as well as their linkage to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), we find that the importance of these factors differed according to the spatial scale. At the scale of the entire Atlantic the patterns of variations are primarily spatially structured, whereas at a more regional scale the patterns of variations were primarily related to the fishing gear. Furthermore, the NAO appeared to also structure the patterns of variations of tuna time series, especially over the North Atlantic. We conclude that the patterns of variations in fisheries time series of tuna and billfish only poorly reflect the underlying dynamics of these fish populations; they appear to be shaped by several successive embedded processes, each interacting with each other. Our results emphasize the necessity for scientific data when investigating the population dynamics of large pelagic fishes, because CPUE fluctuations are not directly attributable to change in species' abundance.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0027-8424, 1091-6490 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1669
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Auteur Jaquemet, S.; Ternon, J.-F.; Kaehler, S.; Thiebot, J.B.; Dyer, B.; Bemanaja, E.; Marteau, C.; Le Corre, M.
Titre (up) Contrasted structuring effects of mesoscale features on the seabird community in the Mozambique Channel Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Research Part II.Topical Studies in Oceanography
Volume 100 Numéro No spécial Pages 200-211
Mots-Clés Foraging habitats; Frigatebird; Marine productivity; Mesoscale eddies; Red-footed booby; Sooty tern; Tropical marine predators; Tuna; Western Indian Ocean
Résumé The Mozambique Channel (western Indian Ocean) is a dynamic environment characterised by strong mesoscale features, which influence all biological components of the pelagic ecosystem. We investigated the distribution, abundance and feeding behaviour of seabirds in the Mozambique Channel in relation to physical and biological environmental variables, with a specific interest in mesoscale features. Seabird censuses were conducted in summer and winter during 7 cruises in the southern and northern Mozambique Channel. Tropical species accounted for 49% of the 37 species identified and 97% of the individuals, and species from the sub-Antarctic region constituted 30% of the identifications. The typically tropical sooty tern (Onychoprion fuscata) was the dominant species during all cruises, and overall accounted for 74% of the species observations and 85% of counted birds. Outputs of Generalised Linear Models at the scale of the Mozambique Channel suggested that higher densities of flying and feeding birds occurred in areas with lower sea surface temperatures and lower surface chlorophyll a concentrations. Most of the flocks of feeding birds did not associate with surface schools of fish or marine mammals, but when they did, these flocks were larger, especially when associated with tuna. While tropical species seemed to favour cyclonic eddies, frontal and divergence zones, non-tropical species were more frequently recorded over shelf waters. Sooty terns foraged preferentially in cyclonic eddies where zooplankton, micronelcton and tuna schools were abundant. Among other major tropical species, frigatebirds (Fregata spp.) predominated in frontal zones between eddies, where tuna schools also frequently occurred and where geostrophic currents were the strongest. Red-footed boobies (Sula sub) concentrated in divergence zones characterised by low sea level anomalies, low geostrophic currents, and high zooplanlcton biomass close to the surface. Our results highlight the importance of mescoscale features in structuring the tropical seabird community in the Mozambique Channel, in addition to segregating tropical and non-tropical species. The mechanisms underlying the segregation of tropical seabirds seem to partially differ from that of other tropical regions, and this may be a consequence of the strong local mesoscale activity, affecting prey size and availability schemes. Beyond characterising the foraging habitats of the seabird community of the Mozambique Channel, this study highlights the importance of this region as a hot spot for seabirds; especially the southern part, where several endangered sub-Antarctic species over-winter.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur Barlow, R.; Marsac, F.; Ternon, J.-F.; Roberts, M.
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 363
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Auteur Díez, G.; Moreno, G.; Galaz, T.; Dagorn, L.; Murua, J.
Titre (up) Digestive activity and stomach temperature in farmed bluefin tuna Thunnus thynnus measured by acoustic tag Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée J Fish Biol
Volume 90 Numéro 6 Pages 2504-2511
Mots-Clés acoustic; Bluefin tuna; digestion; farm; tag; Temperature
Résumé Eight farmed Atlantic bluefin tuna Thunnus thynnus were tagged with temperature and depth transmitters inserted in chub mackerels Scomber colias to characterize their digestive activity, feeding physiology and behaviour in captivity. Results obtained in the experiment can be used to optimize daily T. thynnus feeding strategy in farms, reducing the early regurgitation of food and thus the environmental effects of inappropriate feeding practices.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1095-8649 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2145
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Auteur Robert, M.; Dagorn, L.; Lopez, J.; Moreno, G.; Deneubourg, J.L.
Titre (up) Does social behavior influence the dynamics of aggregations formed by tropical tunas around floating objects ? An experimental approach Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Volume 440 Numéro Pages 238-243
Mots-Clés Aggregation; Binary choice; FADs; Social behavior; tuna
Résumé Tropical tunas associate with objects floating at the surface of the ocean, a behavior widely exploited by fishers. However, the respective roles played by environmental variables and behavioral processes (e.g., social behavior) in the formation of these aggregations remain elusive. To investigate the role of social behavior in the dynamics of such aggregations, we used the binary choice approach. The experimental design comprised two close and identical anchored fish aggregating devices (FADS) equipped with an echo sounder buoy to monitor the aggregated biomass of tuna under each device. Analysis of the results entailed characterizing whether the aggregated biomass is distributed asymmetrically (indicative of social behavior playing a role in the dynamics) or symmetrically between the two close and identical FADs, and comparing the results with theoretical distributions based on different definitions of basic units (individual fish or small schools). The results suggest that social interactions underlie aggregation processes, which represents a major advance in our understanding of these aggregations, a priority for science-based fishery management. While recognizing the logistical and technical constraints, we encourage the development of experimental studies (e.g., in which animals are presented with controlled situations) to enhance our understanding of the behavior of large pelagic fish.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 249
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Auteur Briscoe, D.K.; Hobday, A.J.; Carlisle, A.; Scales, K.; Eveson, J.P.; Arrizabalaga, H.; Druon, J.N.; Fromentin, J.-M.
Titre (up) Ecological bridges and barriers in pelagic ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume 140 Numéro Pages 182-192
Mots-Clés arctic marine mammals; atlantic bluefin tuna; Billfish; Brazilian episode; climate-change; el-nino; interannual variation; Marine mammal; marlin makaira-nigricans; Migration corridors; Oceanographic features; population connectivity; satellite archival tags; sea-turtles; site fidelity; species distribution; thunnus-maccoyii; Tuna
Résumé Many highly mobile species are known to use persistent pathways or corridors to move between habitat patches in which conditions are favorable for particular activities, such as breeding or foraging. In the marine realm, environmental variability can lead to the development of temporary periods of anomalous oceanographic conditions that can connect individuals to areas of habitat outside a population's usual range, or alternatively, restrict individuals from areas usually within their range, thus acting as ecological bridges or ecological barriers. These temporary features can result in novel or irregular trophic interactions and changes in population spatial dynamics, and, therefore, may have significant implications for management of marine ecosystems. Here, we provide evidence of ecological bridges and barriers in different ocean regions, drawing upon five case studies in which particular oceanographic conditions have facilitated or restricted the movements of individuals from highly migratory species. We discuss the potential population-level significance of ecological bridges and barriers, with respect to the life history characteristics of different species, and inter- and intra-population variability in habitat use. Finally, we summarize the persistence of bridge dynamics with time, our ability to monitor bridges and barriers in a changing climate, and implications for forecasting future climate mediated ecosystem change.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2178
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