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Auteur Sempo, G.; Dagorn, L.; Robert, M.; Deneubourg, J.-L. url  doi
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  Titre Impact of increasing deployment of artificial floating objects on the spatial distribution of social fish species Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Applied Ecology  
  Volume 50 Numéro 5 Pages 1081-1092  
  Mots-Clés behaviour-based modelling; Bycatch; Fad; Fob; sustainable fishery; tuna  
  Résumé * Approximately 300 pelagic fish species naturally aggregate around floating objects (FOBs) at the surface of the oceans. Currently, more than 50% of the world catch of tropical tuna comes from the industrial tuna fisheries around drifting FOBs. Greater understanding of the complex decision-making processes leading to this aggregation pattern and the impact of the massive release of artificial FOBs by fishermen on the spatial distribution and management of tuna is needed. * We analyse how the interplay between social (relationships between individuals) and non-social (responses to the environment) behaviours may affect the spatial distribution of a population in a multi-FOB environment. Taking the example of tropical tunas associating with FOBs and using differential equations and stochastic simulations, we examine how, when increasing the number of FOBs, fish aggregation dynamics and the distribution of the population among patches are affected by the population size, level of sociality and the natural retentive and/or attractive forces of FOBs on individual tuna. * Our model predicts that, depending on the species' level of sociality, fish will be scattered among FOBs or aggregated around a single FOB based on the number of FOBs deployed in a homogeneous oceanic region. * For social species, we demonstrated that the total fish catch is reduced with increasing FOBs number. Indeed, for each size of population, there are a number of FOBs minimizing the total population of fish associated with FOBs and another number of FOBs maximizing the total population of associated fish. * Synthesis and applications. In terms of fisheries management, the total catch volume is directly linked to the total number of floating objects (FOBs) for non-social species, and any limit on the number of sets would then result in a limit on the total catch. For social species (e.g. tuna), however, increasing the number of FOBs does not necessarily lead to an increase in the total catch, which is a non-intuitive result. Indeed, our model shows that, for specific values of the parameters, deploying a greater number of FOBs in the water (all other parameters being constant) does not necessarily help fishermen to catch more tuna, but does increase the level of fishing effort and bycatch.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1365-2664 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 265  
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Auteur Escalle, L.; Murua, H.; Amande, J.M.; Arregui, I.; Chavance, P.; Delgado de Molina, A.; Gaertner, D.; Fraile, I.; Filmalter, J.D.; Santiago, J.; Forget, F.; Arrizabalaga, H.; Dagorn, L.; Mérigot, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Post-capture survival of whale sharks encircled in tuna purse-seine nets: tagging and safe release methods Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Conserv: Mar. Freshw. Ecosyst.  
  Volume 25 Numéro 4 Pages 433-447  
  Mots-Clés mega fauna; post-release mortality; Psat; Rhincodon typus; tropical tuna purse-seine  
  Résumé 1. Whale shark, the world's largest fish, is believed to be particularly vulnerable owing to its biological characteristics (slow growth, late maturation, great longevity) and is listed as Vulnerable by IUCN and included in Appendix II of CITES. 2. Whale sharks are occasionally encircled in tropical tuna purse-seine nets, throughout this global fishery. Although apparent immediate survival rates following encirclement and release have recently been assessed through scientific onboard observer programmes, a more rigorous methodology is still required for studying post-released survival. 3. This work provides a method for applying pop-up satellite tags and reports an enhanced release procedure for whale sharks. The first assessment of survival after release from purse-seine nets involved six whale sharks tagged between May and September 2014 in the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean. Five tags transmitted data: three popped up as programmed (after 30 days), while two surfaced prematurely (one after 21 and the other after 71 days (programmed to pop off after 30 and 90 days, respectively)) but showed no sign of unusual behaviour. 4. Overall, whale sharks survived at least 21 days (one at least 71 days) after release from purse-seine nets. These observations based on five large individuals (total length > 8 m), suggest that whale sharks have a good chance of survival when released with the proposed method. 5. Additional tagging in this and other oceans, especially of juveniles which may be more sensitive to encirclement and release operations, is essential to further assess whale shark post-release survival rates in tuna purse-seine fisheries. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.  
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  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1099-0755 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1547  
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Auteur Annasawmy, P.; Cherel, Y.; Romanov, E.; Le Loc'h, F.; Menard, F.; Ternon, J.-F.; Marsac, F. doi  openurl
  Titre Stable isotope patterns of mesopelagic communities over two shallow seamounts of the south-western Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 176 Numéro Pages 104804  
  Mots-Clés biogeochemical provinces; Crustaceans; delta C-13; delta N-15; discrimination factors; feeding ecology; Fish; food-web structure; Micronekton; mozambique channel; particulate organic-matter; Squid; Trophic level; trophic structure; vertical-distribution; water column; yellowfin tuna  
  Résumé The stable carbon (delta C-13) and nitrogen (delta N-15) isotope values of soft tissues of micronekton (crustaceans, squid, mesopelagic fish) and zooplankton were measured from organisms collected on the RV Antea at two seamounts located in the south-western Indian Ocean: La Perouse (summit depth similar to 60 m) and “MAD-Ridge” (thus named in this study; summit depth similar to 240 m). Surface particulate organic matter (POM-Surf) showed higher delta C-13 at the more productive MAD-Ridge than at the oligotrophic La Perouse seamount. Particulate organic matter and zooplankton were depleted in N-15 at La Pemuse pinnacle compared with MAD-Ridge. Gelatinous organisms and crustaceans occupied the lowest and intermediate tmphic levels (TL similar to 2 and 3 respectively) at both seamounts. Mesopelagic fish and smaller-sized squid sampled at both seamounts occupied TL similar to 3 to 4, whereas the large nektonic squid, Ommastrephes bartramii, collected at MAD-Ridge only, exhibited a TL of similar to 5. The delta N-15 values of common open-water mesopelagic taxa were strongly influenced by specimen size and feeding habits at both seamounts, with an increase in delta N-15 values with increasing size. Carnivorous fish species sampled exclusively over the seamounts' flanks and summits exhibited TL values of similar to 4, irrespective of their wide size ranges. The work could not demonstrate any differences in delta C-13 values of mesopelagic fish between the seamounts and the surrounding oceanic areas. The study segregated clusters of mesopelagic organisms according to their delta C-13 and delta N-15 values, with variations in stable isotope values reflecting a complex range of processes possibly linked to productivity as well as biological and ecological traits of the species (size and feeding mode).  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000556810400002 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2835  
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Auteur Torres-Irineo, E.; Dreyfus-Leon, M.; Gaertner, D.; Salas, S.; Marchal, P. doi  openurl
  Titre Adaptive responses of tropical tuna purse-seiners under temporal regulations Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Ambio  
  Volume 46 Numéro 1 Pages 88-97  
  Mots-Clés atlantic; behavior; Closed season; eastern pacific-ocean; eastern tropical pacific; Fisher behaviour; Fisheries management; fishing strategies; fleet dynamics; mixed fisheries; model; Purse-seine fishing; state; trawlers; Tropical tuna  
  Résumé The failure to achieve fisheries management objectives has been broadly discussed in international meetings. Measuring the effects of fishery regulations is difficult due to the lack of detailed information. The yellowfin tuna fishery in the eastern Pacific Ocean offers an opportunity to evaluate the fishers' responses to temporal regulations. We used data from observers on-board Mexican purse-seine fleet, which is the main fleet fishing on dolphin-associated tuna schools. In 2002, the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission implemented a closed season to reduce fishing effort for this fishery. For the period 1992-2008, we analysed three fishery indicators using generalized estimating equations to evaluate the fishers' response to the closure. We found that purse-seiners decreased their time spent in port, increased their fishing sets, and maintained their proportion of successful fishing sets. Our results highlight the relevance of accounting for the fisher behaviour to understand fisheries dynamics when establishing management regulations.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0044-7447 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2072  
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Auteur Gilman, E.; Chaloupka, M.; Bach, P.; Fennell, H.; Hall, M.; Musyl, M.; Piovano, S.; Poisson, F.; Song, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Effect of pelagic longline bait type on species selectivity: a global synthesis of evidence Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Rev. Fish. Biol. Fish.  
  Volume 30 Numéro 3 Pages 535-551  
  Mots-Clés atlantic-ocean; Bait; by-catch; Bycatch; caretta-caretta; circle hooks; feeding-behavior; Longline; Mitigation; publication bias; sea-turtles; Selectivity; shark populations; size-selectivity; swordfish xiphias-gladius; Tuna  
  Résumé Fisheries can profoundly affect bycatch species with 'slow' life history traits. Managing bait type offers one tool to control species selectivity. Different species and sizes of marine predators have different prey, and hence bait, preferences. This preference is a function of a bait's chemical, visual, acoustic and textural characteristics and size, and for seabirds the effect on hook sink rate is also important. We conducted a global meta-analysis of existing estimates of the relative risk of capture on different pelagic longline baits. We applied a Bayesian random effects meta-analytic regression modelling approach to estimate overall expected bait-specific catch rates. For blue shark and marine turtles, there were 34% (95% HDI: 4-59%) and 60% (95% HDI: 44-76%) significantly lower relative risks of capture on forage fish bait than squid bait, respectively. Overall estimates of bait-specific relative risk were not significantly different for seven other assessed taxa. The lack of a significant overall estimate of relative capture risk for pelagic shark species combined but significant effect for blue sharks suggests there is species-specific variability in bait-specific catch risk within this group. A qualitative literature review suggests that tunas and istiophorid billfishes may have higher catch rates on squid than fish bait, which conflicts with reducing marine turtle and blue shark catch rates. The findings from this synthesis of quantitative and qualitative evidence support identifying economically viable bycatch management measures with acceptable tradeoffs when multispecies conflicts are unavoidable, and highlight research priorities for global pelagic longline fisheries.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0960-3166 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000555361400001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2843  
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