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Auteur NIEBLAS, A.-E.; DEMARCQ, H.; DRUSHKA, K.; SLOYAN, B.; BONHOMMEAU, S. url  openurl
  Titre Front variability and surface ocean features of the presumed southern bluefin tuna spawning grounds in the tropical southeast Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-sea Research Part II-topical Studies In Oceanography  
  Volume 107 Numéro Pages 64-76  
  Mots-Clés Front detection index; Indo-Australian region; Oceanic fronts; Southern bluefin tuna Thunnus maccoyii; Spawning grounds (10 degrees S-20 degrees S 105 degrees E-125 degrees E); Tropical southeast Indian Ocean  
  Résumé The southern bluefin tuna (SBT, Thunnus maccoyii) is an ecologically and economically valuable fish. However, surprisingly little is known about its critical early life history, a period when mortality is several orders of magnitude higher than at any other life stage, and when larvae are highly sensitive to environmental conditions. Ocean fronts can be important in creating favourable spawning conditions, as they are a convergence of water masses with different properties that can concentrate planktonic particles and lead to enhanced productivity. In this study, we examine the front activity within the only region where SBT have been observed to spawn: the tropical southeast Indian Ocean between Indonesia and Australia (10 degrees S-20 degrees S, 105 degrees E-125 degrees E). We investigate front activity and its relationship to ocean dynamics and surface features of the region. Results are also presented for the entire Indian Ocean (30 degrees N-45 degrees S, 20 degrees E-140 degrees E) to provide a background context. We use an extension of the Cayula and Cornillon algorithm to detect ocean fronts from satellite images of sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll-a concentration (chl-a). Front occurrence represents the probability of occurrence of a front at each pixel of an image. Front intensity represents the magnitude of the difference between the two water masses that make up a front. Relative to the rest of the Indian Ocean, both SST and chl-a fronts in the offshore spawning region are persistent in occurrence and weak in intensity. Front occurrence and intensity along the Australian coast are high, with persistent and intense fronts found along the northwest and west coasts. Fronts in the tropical southeast Indian Ocean are shown to have strong annual variability and some moderate interannual variability. SST front occurrence is found to lead the Southern Oscillation Index by one year, potentially linked to warming and wind anomalies in the Indian Ocean. The surface ocean characteristics of the offshore SBT spawning region are found to be particularly stable compared to the rest of the Indian Ocean in terms of stable SST, low eddy kinetic energy, i.e., low mesoscale eddy activity, and low chl-a. However, this region has high front occurrence, but low front intensity of both SST and chl-a fronts. The potential impact of these oceanic features for SBT spawning is discussed.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection (up) Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1131  
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Auteur Walker, E.; Bez, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre A pioneer validation of a state-space model of vessel trajectories (VMS) with observers' data Type Article scientifique
  Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Modelling  
  Volume 221 Numéro Pages 2008-2017  
  Mots-Clés Bayes; data; Markov; model; Monitoring; Observers'; purse-seiners; state-space; Systems; Trajectory; Tropical; tuna; Validation; Vessel; (Vms)  
  Résumé In the context of the expansion of animal tracking and bio-logging, state-space models have been developed with the objective to characterise animals' trajectories and to understand the factors controlling their behaviour. In the fisheries community, the electronic tagging of vessels commonly designated by Vessel Monitoring Systems (VMS) is developing and provides a new insight for the understanding, the analysis and the modelling of the trajectories of vessels and their prospecting behaviour. VMS data are thus a clue for the proper definition of fishing effort which remains a fundamental parameter of tuna stock assessments. In this context, we used the VMS (recording of hourly positions) of the French tropical tuna purse-seiners operating in the Indian Ocean to characterise three types of movement (states) on the VMS trajectories (stillness, tracking, and cruising). Based on empirical evidences, and on the regular frequency of VMS acquisition, this was achieved by the development of a Bayesian Hidden Markov model for the speeds and turning angles derived from the hourly steps of the trajectories. In a second phase, states were related to activities disentangling stillness into fishing or stop at sea. Finally the quality of the model performances was rigorously quantified thanks to observers' data. Confronting model prediction and true activities allowed estimating that 10% of the hourly steps were misclassified. The assumptions and model' choices are discussed, highlighting the fact that VMS data and observers' data having different time resolutions, the effective use of validating data was troublesome. However, without validation, these analyses remain speculative. The validation part of this work represents an important step for the operational use of state-space models in ecology in the broad sense (predators' tracking data, e.g. birds or mammals trajectories).  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection (up) Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3800 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 112  
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Auteur Moreno, G.; Dagorn, L.; Capello, M.; Lopez, J.; Filmalter, T.; Forget, F.; Sancristobal, I.; Holland, K. doi  openurl
  Titre Fish aggregating devices (FADs) as scientific platforms Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish Res.  
  Volume 178 Numéro Pages 122-129  
  Mots-Clés abundance; Acoustic tags; association; behavior; Echo-sounder buoy; fad; Fishing technology; indian-ocean; pacific-ocean; Pelagic ecosystem; pelagic fish; purse-seine fisheries; thunnus-albacares; Tropical tuna; Tuna; western; yellowfin  
  Résumé Fish aggregating devices (FADs) are floating objects used by fishers to aggregate pelagic fish such as tunas, and enhance the catch of these species. Because this is so important for tuna fisheries, nearly 100,000 FADs are deployed by fishers every year in the world's tropical oceans. Fishers use geo-locating buoys to track and maintain these FADs by visiting them regularly, reinforcing them if they are weak or replacing them. Many of these buoys are now equipped with echo-sounders in order to provide remote information on the aggregated biomass. FADs are currently only used for fishing purposes but they can also serve scientific objectives. In this paper, we investigate the potential of these data for improving our knowledge on the ecology of tunas and other pelagic animals as well as to obtain fishery-independent indices of distribution and abundance. These FADs also represent platforms for scientists to deploy scientific instruments, such as electronic tag receivers, cameras and hydrophones. Because FADs naturally aggregate several pelagic species other than tuna, these instrumented FADs can be a unique opportunity to observe pelagic ecosystem dynamics that are not possible from conventional research vessels. The amount of cost-effective data that they can provide would make a significant contribution to the scientific understanding of pelagic ecosystems. This information is vital for improved conservation and management of pelagic fisheries. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection (up) Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1650  
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Auteur Lefevre, S.; Mckenzie, D.J.; Nilsson, G.E. doi  openurl
  Titre Models projecting the fate of fish populations under climate change need to be based on valid physiological mechanisms Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.  
  Volume 23 Numéro 9 Pages 3449-3459  
  Mots-Clés aerobic scope; coryphaena-hippurus; energy-demand teleosts; gadus-morhua l; gill surface area; growth; makaira-nigricans; marlin tetrapturus-albidus; metabolism; metabolism-size relationship; oxygen consumption; oxygen-consumption; ram ventilation; Respiration; scaling; swimming performance; tuna katsuwonus-pelamis  
  Résumé Some recent modelling papers projecting smaller fish sizes and catches in a warmer future are based on erroneous assumptions regarding (i) the scaling of gills with body mass and (ii) the energetic cost of 'maintenance'. Assumption (i) posits that insurmountable geometric constraints prevent respiratory surface areas from growing as fast as body volume. It is argued that these constraints explain allometric scaling of energy metabolism, whereby larger fishes have relatively lower mass-specific metabolic rates. Assumption (ii) concludes that when fishes reach a certain size, basal oxygen demands will not be met, because of assumption (i). We here demonstrate unequivocally, by applying accepted physiological principles with reference to the existing literature, that these assumptions are not valid. Gills are folded surfaces, where the scaling of surface area to volume is not constrained by spherical geometry. The gill surface area can, in fact, increase linearly in proportion to gill volume and body mass. We cite the large body of evidence demonstrating that respiratory surface areas in fishes reflect metabolic needs, not vice versa, which explains the large interspecific variation in scaling of gill surface areas. Finally, we point out that future studies basing their predictions on models should incorporate factors for scaling of metabolic rate and for temperature effects on metabolism, which agree with measured values, and should account for interspecific variation in scaling and temperature effects. It is possible that some fishes will become smaller in the future, but to make reliable predictions the underlying mechanisms need to be identified and sought elsewhere than in geometric constraints on gill surface area. Furthermore, to ensure that useful information is conveyed to the public and policymakers about the possible effects of climate change, it is necessary to improve communication and congruity between fish physiologists and fisheries scientists.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection (up) Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2169  
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Auteur Nikolic, N.; Lauretta, M.; Patucca, A.; Morandeau, G. doi  openurl
  Titre Characterization and standardization of the Atlantic albacore French pelagic trawl fishery Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Living Resour.  
  Volume 31 Numéro Pages 31  
  Mots-Clés Albacore; Atlantic; behavior; catch; catch rates; fisheries; habitat; migration; north pacific albacore; ocean; stock; thunnus-alalunga; trawl; tuna  
  Résumé We compiled and analysed logbook data from the French trawl albacore fishery covering the period 1991-2015. The dataset comprised catch and effort data for the French fleet operating in the Bay of Biscay and Celtic Sea, as well as spatiotemporal and gear characteristics. Generalized linear modelling was used to model spatial, seasonal, environmental, and gear covariates of fleet CPUE rates. A long-term index of relative abundance is provided that can be integrated into the stock assessment of North Atlantic albacore. The analysis revealed higher albacore CPUE associated with relatively low sea surface temperature and distinct seasonal effects. The derived abundance trend for the French trawl fishery agreed with the estimated time series of stock abundance from recent assessments.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection (up) Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0990-7440 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2426  
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