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Auteur NIEBLAS, A.-E.; DEMARCQ, H.; DRUSHKA, K.; SLOYAN, B.; BONHOMMEAU, S. url  openurl
  Titre Front variability and surface ocean features of the presumed southern bluefin tuna spawning grounds in the tropical southeast Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-sea Research Part II-topical Studies In Oceanography  
  Volume 107 Numéro Pages 64-76  
  Mots-Clés Front detection index; Indo-Australian region; Oceanic fronts; Southern bluefin tuna Thunnus maccoyii; Spawning grounds (10 degrees S-20 degrees S 105 degrees E-125 degrees E); Tropical southeast Indian Ocean  
  Résumé The southern bluefin tuna (SBT, Thunnus maccoyii) is an ecologically and economically valuable fish. However, surprisingly little is known about its critical early life history, a period when mortality is several orders of magnitude higher than at any other life stage, and when larvae are highly sensitive to environmental conditions. Ocean fronts can be important in creating favourable spawning conditions, as they are a convergence of water masses with different properties that can concentrate planktonic particles and lead to enhanced productivity. In this study, we examine the front activity within the only region where SBT have been observed to spawn: the tropical southeast Indian Ocean between Indonesia and Australia (10 degrees S-20 degrees S, 105 degrees E-125 degrees E). We investigate front activity and its relationship to ocean dynamics and surface features of the region. Results are also presented for the entire Indian Ocean (30 degrees N-45 degrees S, 20 degrees E-140 degrees E) to provide a background context. We use an extension of the Cayula and Cornillon algorithm to detect ocean fronts from satellite images of sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll-a concentration (chl-a). Front occurrence represents the probability of occurrence of a front at each pixel of an image. Front intensity represents the magnitude of the difference between the two water masses that make up a front. Relative to the rest of the Indian Ocean, both SST and chl-a fronts in the offshore spawning region are persistent in occurrence and weak in intensity. Front occurrence and intensity along the Australian coast are high, with persistent and intense fronts found along the northwest and west coasts. Fronts in the tropical southeast Indian Ocean are shown to have strong annual variability and some moderate interannual variability. SST front occurrence is found to lead the Southern Oscillation Index by one year, potentially linked to warming and wind anomalies in the Indian Ocean. The surface ocean characteristics of the offshore SBT spawning region are found to be particularly stable compared to the rest of the Indian Ocean in terms of stable SST, low eddy kinetic energy, i.e., low mesoscale eddy activity, and low chl-a. However, this region has high front occurrence, but low front intensity of both SST and chl-a fronts. The potential impact of these oceanic features for SBT spawning is discussed.  
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  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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Auteur Walker, E.; Rivoirard, J.; Gaspar, P.; Bez, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre From forager tracks to prey distributions: an application to tuna vessel monitoring systems (VMS) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Ecological Applications Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 25 Numéro 3 Pages 826-833  
  Mots-Clés Gps; multivariate geostatistics; presence index; spatiotemporal distribution; trajectometry; Tropical tuna; vessel monitoring system (VMS)  
  Résumé In the open ocean, movements of migratory fish populations are typically surveyed using tagging methods that are subject to low sample sizes for archive tags, except for a few notable examples, and poor temporal resolution for conventional tags. Alternatively, one can infer patterns of movement of migratory fish by tracking movements of their predators, i.e., fishing vessels, whose navigational systems (e.g., GPS) provide accurate and frequent VMS (vessel monitoring system) records of movement in pursuit of prey. In this paper, we develop a state-space model that infers the foraging activities of fishing vessels from their tracks. Second, we link foraging activities to probabilities of tuna presence. Finally, using multivariate geostatistical interpolation (cokriging) we map the probability of tuna presence together with their estimation variances and produce a time series of indices of abundance. While the segmentation of the trajectories is validated by observers' data, the present VMS-index is compared to catch rate and proved to be useful for management perspectives. The approach reported in this manuscript extends beyond the case study considered. It can be applied to any foragers that engage in an attempt of capture when they see prey and for whom this attempt is linked to a tractable change in behavior.  
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  ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Médium  
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Auteur Gaertner, D.; Hallier, J.-P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Tag shedding by tropical tunas in the Indian Ocean and other factors affecting the shedding rate Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Fisheries Research Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 163 Numéro Si Pages 98-105  
  Mots-Clés averaging; Bayesian model; Beta-binomial model; Indian Ocean; Shedding rate; Tagging data; Tropical tunas  
  Résumé A key objective of the Regional Tuna Tagging Project Indian Ocean was to estimate tag-shedding rates, Type-I (immediate tag shedding) and Type-II (long-term tag shedding). To assess this, a series of double-tagging experiments (26,899 double tags released with 4555 recoveries) were conducted as part of the broader tagging program. After omitting data from tags placed by less experienced taggers, the results of our analyses did not show any evidence that individual differences between taggers (i.e., a tagger effect) impacted estimates of tag-shedding rates. However, it was shown that the probability of retaining the second tag (inserted in the left side of the fish) was larger than retaining the first tag (inserted in the right side, i.e., the side typically tagged in single-tagging experiments). We used a Bayesian model averaging approach to account for model uncertainty in the estimates of the parameters a and L used to calculate the probability of tag retention Q(t)= alpha e-((L t)) for the right tag. The parameter estimates were alpha = 0.993 and L (per year) = 0.030 (skipjack); alpha = 0.972 and L (per year) = 0.040 (yellowfin); and alpha = 0.990 and L (per year) = 0.021 (bigeye). These results agree with estimates obtained by other large-scale tropical tuna tagging projects. We showed that tag loss has a moderate impact on the underestimation of the exploitation rate (bias = 2-6% depending on the tuna species). However, non-reporting leads to a bias of around 7% when using the high reporting rate estimate of purse seiners. Finally, tag shedding (specifically Type-II shedding) modified the individual weights of the samples of recaptures. Consequently, the total instantaneous mortality estimates (Z; calculated from mean times-at-large) were reduced by a range of 1-3%.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur Murua, H.; Marsac, F.; Eveson, J.P.  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
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Auteur DRUON, J.-N.; FROMENTIN, J.-M.; AULANIER, F.; HEIKKONEN, J. url  openurl
  Titre Potential feeding and spawning habitats of Atlantic bluefin tuna in the Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2011 Publication Marine Ecology-progress Series Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 439 Numéro Pages 223-240  
  Mots-Clés Habitat mapping; Bluefin tuna; Thunnus thynnus; Feeding; Spawning; Mediterranean Sea; Remote sensing; Satellite data  
  Résumé Atlantic bluefin tuna Thunnus thynnus (ABFT) is a fish of high market value which has recently become strongly overexploited, notably in the Mediterranean Sea. This area is an essential habitat for ABFT reproduction and growth. We present here an approach for deriving the daily mapping of potential ABFT feeding and spawning habitats based on satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) and chl a concentration. The feeding habitat was mainly derived from the simultaneous occurrence of oceanic fronts of temperature and chl a content while the spawning habitat was mostly inferred from the heating of surface waters. Generally, higher chl a contents were found to be preferred for the feeding habitat and a minimum SST value was found for the spawning habitat. Both habitats were defined by the presence of relevant oceanographic features and are therefore potential and functionally-linked habitats. This approach provides, for the first time, a synoptic view of the potential ABFT habitats in the Mediterranean Sea. The model performs well in areas where both satellite data and ABFT observations are available, as 80% of presence data are in the vicinity of potential habitats. The computed monthly, seasonal and annual maps of potential feeding and spawning habitat of ABFT from 2003 to 2009 are in good agreement with current knowledge on ABFT. Overall, the habitat size of ABFT is about 6% of the Mediterranean Sea surface. The results displayed a strong seasonality in habitat size and locations as well as high year-to-year variations (30 to 60%), particularly for the potential spawning habitat, which is key information for evaluating the utility of ABFT Marine Protected Areas in the Mediterranean Sea.  
  Adresse IFREMER, Ctr Rech Halieut Mediterraneen & Trop, F-34203 Sete, France.  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Inter-research Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
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Auteur Arrizabalaga, H.; Dufour, F.; Kell, L.; Merino, G.; Ibaibarriaga, L.; Chust, G.; Irigoien, X.; Santiago, J.; Murua, H.; Fraile, I.; Chifflet, M.; Goikoetxea, N.; Sagarminaga, Y.; Aumont, O.; Bopp, L.; Herrera, M.; FROMENTIN, J.-M.; Bonhomeau, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Global habitat preferences of commercially valuable tuna Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 113 Numéro Pages 102-112  
  Mots-Clés Habitat; Tuna fisheries; Catch/ effort; Environmental conditions; Quotient analysis; Generalized Additive Models; Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management  
  Résumé In spite of its pivotal role in future implementations of the Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management, current knowledge about tuna habitat preferences remains fragmented and heterogeneous, because it relies mainly on regional or local studies that have used a variety of approaches making them difficult to combine. Therefore in this study we analyse data from six tuna species in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans in order to provide a global, comparative perspective of habitat preferences. These data are longline catch per unit effort from 1958 to2007 for albacore, Atlantic bluefin, southern bluefin, bigeye, yellowfin and skipjack tunas. Both quotient analysis and Generalized Additive Models were used to determine habitat preference with respect to eight biotic and abiotic variables. Results confirmed that, compared to temperate tunas, tropical tunas prefer warm, anoxic, stratified waters. Atlantic and southern bluefin tuna prefer higher concentrations of chlorophyll than the rest. The two species also tolerate most extreme sea surface height anomalies and highest mixed layer depths. In general, Atlantic bluefin tuna tolerates the widest range of environmental conditions. An assessment of the most important variables determining fish habitat is also provided.  
  Adresse Ifremer, UMR 212 EME, boulevard Jean Monnet, BP 171, Sete Cedex, 34203, France  
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  Editeur Elsevier BV Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
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  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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