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Auteur Lefevre, S.; Mckenzie, D.J.; Nilsson, G.E. doi  openurl
  Titre Models projecting the fate of fish populations under climate change need to be based on valid physiological mechanisms Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.  
  Volume 23 Numéro 9 Pages 3449-3459  
  Mots-Clés (up) aerobic scope; coryphaena-hippurus; energy-demand teleosts; gadus-morhua l; gill surface area; growth; makaira-nigricans; marlin tetrapturus-albidus; metabolism; metabolism-size relationship; oxygen consumption; oxygen-consumption; ram ventilation; Respiration; scaling; swimming performance; tuna katsuwonus-pelamis  
  Résumé Some recent modelling papers projecting smaller fish sizes and catches in a warmer future are based on erroneous assumptions regarding (i) the scaling of gills with body mass and (ii) the energetic cost of 'maintenance'. Assumption (i) posits that insurmountable geometric constraints prevent respiratory surface areas from growing as fast as body volume. It is argued that these constraints explain allometric scaling of energy metabolism, whereby larger fishes have relatively lower mass-specific metabolic rates. Assumption (ii) concludes that when fishes reach a certain size, basal oxygen demands will not be met, because of assumption (i). We here demonstrate unequivocally, by applying accepted physiological principles with reference to the existing literature, that these assumptions are not valid. Gills are folded surfaces, where the scaling of surface area to volume is not constrained by spherical geometry. The gill surface area can, in fact, increase linearly in proportion to gill volume and body mass. We cite the large body of evidence demonstrating that respiratory surface areas in fishes reflect metabolic needs, not vice versa, which explains the large interspecific variation in scaling of gill surface areas. Finally, we point out that future studies basing their predictions on models should incorporate factors for scaling of metabolic rate and for temperature effects on metabolism, which agree with measured values, and should account for interspecific variation in scaling and temperature effects. It is possible that some fishes will become smaller in the future, but to make reliable predictions the underlying mechanisms need to be identified and sought elsewhere than in geometric constraints on gill surface area. Furthermore, to ensure that useful information is conveyed to the public and policymakers about the possible effects of climate change, it is necessary to improve communication and congruity between fish physiologists and fisheries scientists.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2169  
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Auteur Nikolic, N.; Jérôme, M.; Fonteneau, A.; Evano, H.; Verrez-Bagnis, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Identification of skipjack tuna juveniles based on DNA control region sequences and potential spawning area around reunion island Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Environmental Biology of Fishes  
  Volume 99 Numéro 2 Pages 171-178  
  Mots-Clés (up) Age; dna; juvenile; Reunion island; skipjack tuna  
  Résumé In this study, we confirmed that DNA control region can be used to identify potential spawning area from pelagic juveniles species. We used the mitochondrial DNA control region to identify tuna juveniles predated by common dolphinfish and sampled in surface waters around Reunion Island. These were skipjack juveniles at an early stage (small length and young age). The biological results confirmed the species identification based on DNA analysis. Catch data by longline reveal a higher number of skipjack from October to December around Reunion Island corresponding to the period of our skipjack juvenile sampling  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0378-1909 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1518  
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Auteur Robert, M.; Dagorn, L.; Lopez, J.; Moreno, G.; Deneubourg, J.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Does social behavior influence the dynamics of aggregations formed by tropical tunas around floating objects ? An experimental approach Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology  
  Volume 440 Numéro Pages 238-243  
  Mots-Clés (up) Aggregation; Binary choice; FADs; Social behavior; tuna  
  Résumé Tropical tunas associate with objects floating at the surface of the ocean, a behavior widely exploited by fishers. However, the respective roles played by environmental variables and behavioral processes (e.g., social behavior) in the formation of these aggregations remain elusive. To investigate the role of social behavior in the dynamics of such aggregations, we used the binary choice approach. The experimental design comprised two close and identical anchored fish aggregating devices (FADS) equipped with an echo sounder buoy to monitor the aggregated biomass of tuna under each device. Analysis of the results entailed characterizing whether the aggregated biomass is distributed asymmetrically (indicative of social behavior playing a role in the dynamics) or symmetrically between the two close and identical FADs, and comparing the results with theoretical distributions based on different definitions of basic units (individual fish or small schools). The results suggest that social interactions underlie aggregation processes, which represents a major advance in our understanding of these aggregations, a priority for science-based fishery management. While recognizing the logistical and technical constraints, we encourage the development of experimental studies (e.g., in which animals are presented with controlled situations) to enhance our understanding of the behavior of large pelagic fish.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0022-0981 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 249  
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Auteur Olson, R.J.; Young, J.W.; Menard, F.; Potier, M.; Allain, V.; Goni, N.; Logan, J.M.; Galvan-Magana, F. isbn  openurl
  Titre Bioenergetics, Trophic Ecology, and Niche Separation of Tunas Type Chapitre de livre
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée  
  Volume Numéro Pages 199-344  
  Mots-Clés (up) albacore thunnus-alalunga; atlantic bluefin tuna; eastern tropical pacific; fish aggregation devices; gulf-of-mexico; large pelagic fishes; oceanic top predators; predator-prey interactions; satellite archival tags; western indian-ocean  
  Résumé Tunas are highly specialized predators that have evolved numerous adaptations for a lifestyle that requires large amounts of energy consumption. Here we review our understanding of the bioenergetics and feeding dynamics of tunas on a global scale, with an emphasis on yellowfin, bigeye, skipjack, albacore, and Atlantic bluefin tunas. Food consumption balances bioenergetics expenditures for respiration, growth (including gonad production), specific dynamic action, egestion, and excretion. Tunas feed across the micronekton and some large zooplankton. Some tunas appear to time their life history to take advantage of ephemeral aggregations of crustacean, fish, and molluscan prey. Ontogenetic and spatial diet differences are substantial, and significant interdecadal changes in prey composition have been observed. Diet shifts from larger to smaller prey taxa highlight ecosystem-wide changes in prey availability and diversity and provide implications for changing bioenergetics requirements into the future. Where tunas overlap, we show evidence of niche separation between them; resources are divided largely by differences in diet percentages and size ranges of prey taxa. The lack of long-term data limits the ability to predict impacts of climate change on tuna feeding behaviour. We note the need for systematic collection of feeding data as part of routine monitoring of these species, and we highlight the advantages of using biochemical techniques for broad-scale analyses of trophic relations. We support the continued development of ecosystem models, which all too often lack the regional-specific trophic data needed to adequately investigate climate and fishing impacts.  
  Adresse  
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  Editeur Elsevier Academic Press Inc Lieu de Publication San Diego Éditeur Curry, B.E.  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Advances in Marine Biology, Vol 74  
  Volume de collection 74 Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-0-12-803607-5 Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1661  
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Auteur Nikolic, N.; Lauretta, M.; Patucca, A.; Morandeau, G. doi  openurl
  Titre Characterization and standardization of the Atlantic albacore French pelagic trawl fishery Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Living Resour.  
  Volume 31 Numéro Pages 31  
  Mots-Clés (up) Albacore; Atlantic; behavior; catch; catch rates; fisheries; habitat; migration; north pacific albacore; ocean; stock; thunnus-alalunga; trawl; tuna  
  Résumé We compiled and analysed logbook data from the French trawl albacore fishery covering the period 1991-2015. The dataset comprised catch and effort data for the French fleet operating in the Bay of Biscay and Celtic Sea, as well as spatiotemporal and gear characteristics. Generalized linear modelling was used to model spatial, seasonal, environmental, and gear covariates of fleet CPUE rates. A long-term index of relative abundance is provided that can be integrated into the stock assessment of North Atlantic albacore. The analysis revealed higher albacore CPUE associated with relatively low sea surface temperature and distinct seasonal effects. The derived abundance trend for the French trawl fishery agreed with the estimated time series of stock abundance from recent assessments.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0990-7440 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2426  
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