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Auteur Escalle, L.; Murua, H.; Amande, J.M.; Arregui, I.; Chavance, P.; Delgado de Molina, A.; Gaertner, D.; Fraile, I.; Filmalter, J.D.; Santiago, J.; Forget, F.; Arrizabalaga, H.; Dagorn, L.; Mérigot, B.
Titre Post-capture survival of whale sharks encircled in tuna purse-seine nets: tagging and safe release methods Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Conserv: Mar. Freshw. Ecosyst.
Volume 25 Numéro 4 Pages 433-447
Mots-Clés mega fauna; post-release mortality; Psat; Rhincodon typus; tropical tuna purse-seine
Résumé 1. Whale shark, the world's largest fish, is believed to be particularly vulnerable owing to its biological characteristics (slow growth, late maturation, great longevity) and is listed as Vulnerable by IUCN and included in Appendix II of CITES. 2. Whale sharks are occasionally encircled in tropical tuna purse-seine nets, throughout this global fishery. Although apparent immediate survival rates following encirclement and release have recently been assessed through scientific onboard observer programmes, a more rigorous methodology is still required for studying post-released survival. 3. This work provides a method for applying pop-up satellite tags and reports an enhanced release procedure for whale sharks. The first assessment of survival after release from purse-seine nets involved six whale sharks tagged between May and September 2014 in the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean. Five tags transmitted data: three popped up as programmed (after 30 days), while two surfaced prematurely (one after 21 and the other after 71 days (programmed to pop off after 30 and 90 days, respectively)) but showed no sign of unusual behaviour. 4. Overall, whale sharks survived at least 21 days (one at least 71 days) after release from purse-seine nets. These observations based on five large individuals (total length > 8 m), suggest that whale sharks have a good chance of survival when released with the proposed method. 5. Additional tagging in this and other oceans, especially of juveniles which may be more sensitive to encirclement and release operations, is essential to further assess whale shark post-release survival rates in tuna purse-seine fisheries. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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ISSN (up) 1099-0755 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1547
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Auteur Dueri, S.; Bopp, L.; Maury, O.
Titre Projecting the impacts of climate change on skipjack tuna abundance and spatial distribution Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Change Biology
Volume 20 Numéro 3 Pages 742-753
Mots-Clés Apecosm-E; Atlantic Ocean; global warming; Indian Ocean; Katsuwonus pelamis; Pacific Ocean; scenario; Tropical tuna
Résumé Climate-induced changes in the physical, chemical, and biological environment are expected to increasingly stress marine ecosystems, with important consequences for fisheries exploitation. Here, we use the APECOSM-E numerical model (Apex Predator ECOSystem Model – Estimation) to evaluate the future impacts of climate change on the physiology, spatial distribution, and abundance of skipjack tuna, the worldwide most fished species of tropical tuna. The main novelties of our approach lie in the mechanistic link between environmental factors, metabolic rates, and behavioral responses and in the fully three dimensional representation of habitat and population abundance. Physical and biogeochemical fields used to force the model are provided by the last generation of the IPSL-CM5 Earth System Model run from 1990 to 2100 under a &8216;business-as-usual&8217; scenario (RCP8.5). Our simulations show significant changes in the spatial distribution of skipjack tuna suitable habitat, as well as in their population abundance. The model projects deterioration of skipjack habitat in most tropical waters and an improvement of habitat at higher latitudes. The primary driver of habitat changes is ocean warming, followed by food density changes. Our projections show an increase of global skipjack biomass between 2010 and 2050 followed by a marked decrease between 2050 and 2095. Spawning rates are consistent with population trends, showing that spawning depends primarily on the adult biomass. On the other hand, growth rates display very smooth temporal changes, suggesting that the ability of skipjack to keep high metabolic rates in the changing environment is generally effective. Uncertainties related to our model spatial resolution, to the lack or simplification of key processes and to the climate forcings are discussed.
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 327
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Auteur Lefevre, S.; Mckenzie, D.J.; Nilsson, G.E.
Titre Models projecting the fate of fish populations under climate change need to be based on valid physiological mechanisms Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.
Volume 23 Numéro 9 Pages 3449-3459
Mots-Clés aerobic scope; coryphaena-hippurus; energy-demand teleosts; gadus-morhua l; gill surface area; growth; makaira-nigricans; marlin tetrapturus-albidus; metabolism; metabolism-size relationship; oxygen consumption; oxygen-consumption; ram ventilation; Respiration; scaling; swimming performance; tuna katsuwonus-pelamis
Résumé Some recent modelling papers projecting smaller fish sizes and catches in a warmer future are based on erroneous assumptions regarding (i) the scaling of gills with body mass and (ii) the energetic cost of 'maintenance'. Assumption (i) posits that insurmountable geometric constraints prevent respiratory surface areas from growing as fast as body volume. It is argued that these constraints explain allometric scaling of energy metabolism, whereby larger fishes have relatively lower mass-specific metabolic rates. Assumption (ii) concludes that when fishes reach a certain size, basal oxygen demands will not be met, because of assumption (i). We here demonstrate unequivocally, by applying accepted physiological principles with reference to the existing literature, that these assumptions are not valid. Gills are folded surfaces, where the scaling of surface area to volume is not constrained by spherical geometry. The gill surface area can, in fact, increase linearly in proportion to gill volume and body mass. We cite the large body of evidence demonstrating that respiratory surface areas in fishes reflect metabolic needs, not vice versa, which explains the large interspecific variation in scaling of gill surface areas. Finally, we point out that future studies basing their predictions on models should incorporate factors for scaling of metabolic rate and for temperature effects on metabolism, which agree with measured values, and should account for interspecific variation in scaling and temperature effects. It is possible that some fishes will become smaller in the future, but to make reliable predictions the underlying mechanisms need to be identified and sought elsewhere than in geometric constraints on gill surface area. Furthermore, to ensure that useful information is conveyed to the public and policymakers about the possible effects of climate change, it is necessary to improve communication and congruity between fish physiologists and fisheries scientists.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2169
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Auteur Mazurais, D.; Covès, D.; Papandroulakis, N.; Ortega, A.; Desbruyeres, E.; Huelvan, C.; Le Gall, M.M.; de la Gándara, F.; Cahu, C.L.
Titre Gene expression pattern of digestive and antioxidant enzymes during the larval development of reared Atlantic bluefin tuna (ABFT), Thunnus thynnus L Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquac Res
Volume 46 Numéro 10 Pages 2323-2331
Mots-Clés antioxidant; development; digestion; expression; gene; Tuna
Résumé The aim of this study was to determine whether mortality observed during the larval development of reared bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) could be related to improper expression profiles of key genes involved in digestive or antioxidant response capabilities. Tuna larvae were sampled at hatching, 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20 dph (days post hatching) for the relative quantification of transcripts encoded by genes involved in digestive [trypsinogen 1 (TRYP1), alpha-amylase (AMY), aminopeptidase N (ANPEP)] and antioxidant [catalase (CAT)] functions. The levels of expression of ANPEP related to the development and maturation of intestinal function increased from 5 to 20 dph. Furthermore, AMY and TRYP1 genes, which are pancreatic enzymes implicated in carbohydrate and peptide digestions exhibit a typical peak of expression at 5 and 15 dph respectively. The antioxidant enzyme, CAT, exhibited higher mRNA levels during the first stage of larval development. In conclusion, our investigation indicates that the expression of genes involved in digestive and antioxidant physiological processes followed typical patterns which could not explain high mortality rate observed during the first stage of larval development.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1455
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Auteur Sempo, G.; Dagorn, L.; Robert, M.; Deneubourg, J.-L.
Titre Impact of increasing deployment of artificial floating objects on the spatial distribution of social fish species Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Applied Ecology
Volume 50 Numéro 5 Pages 1081-1092
Mots-Clés behaviour-based modelling; Bycatch; Fad; Fob; sustainable fishery; tuna
Résumé * Approximately 300 pelagic fish species naturally aggregate around floating objects (FOBs) at the surface of the oceans. Currently, more than 50% of the world catch of tropical tuna comes from the industrial tuna fisheries around drifting FOBs. Greater understanding of the complex decision-making processes leading to this aggregation pattern and the impact of the massive release of artificial FOBs by fishermen on the spatial distribution and management of tuna is needed. * We analyse how the interplay between social (relationships between individuals) and non-social (responses to the environment) behaviours may affect the spatial distribution of a population in a multi-FOB environment. Taking the example of tropical tunas associating with FOBs and using differential equations and stochastic simulations, we examine how, when increasing the number of FOBs, fish aggregation dynamics and the distribution of the population among patches are affected by the population size, level of sociality and the natural retentive and/or attractive forces of FOBs on individual tuna. * Our model predicts that, depending on the species' level of sociality, fish will be scattered among FOBs or aggregated around a single FOB based on the number of FOBs deployed in a homogeneous oceanic region. * For social species, we demonstrated that the total fish catch is reduced with increasing FOBs number. Indeed, for each size of population, there are a number of FOBs minimizing the total population of fish associated with FOBs and another number of FOBs maximizing the total population of associated fish. * Synthesis and applications. In terms of fisheries management, the total catch volume is directly linked to the total number of floating objects (FOBs) for non-social species, and any limit on the number of sets would then result in a limit on the total catch. For social species (e.g. tuna), however, increasing the number of FOBs does not necessarily lead to an increase in the total catch, which is a non-intuitive result. Indeed, our model shows that, for specific values of the parameters, deploying a greater number of FOBs in the water (all other parameters being constant) does not necessarily help fishermen to catch more tuna, but does increase the level of fishing effort and bycatch.
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 265
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