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Auteur Escalle, L.; Gaertner, D.; Chavance, P.; Murua, H.; Simier, M.; Jose Pascual-Alayon, P.; Menard, F.; Ruiz, J.; Abascal, F.; Mérigot, B. doi  openurl
  Titre Catch and bycatch captured by tropical tuna purse-seine fishery in whale and whale shark associated sets: comparison with free school and FAD sets Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Biodivers. Conserv.  
  Volume 28 Numéro 2 Pages (down) 467-499  
  Mots-Clés diversity; mortality; atlantic; biology; Bycatch; strategies; Megafauna; behavior; dominance; yellowfin; Catch composition; Diversity; Ecosystem approach to fisheries management; swimming speeds; Tuna purse-seine fishery  
  Résumé In an ecosystem approach to fisheries management (EAFM) framework of the tuna purse-seine fishery, the assessment of target species, but also that of bycatch species, is essential. In the Atlantic and Indian oceans, purse-seine nets are sometimes set around tuna schools associated with whale sharks and baleen whales, although less frequently than around free-swimming tuna schools or those associated with fish aggregating devices (FAD). However, knowledge on the targeted catch and bycatch in these megafauna associated fishing sets is still relatively limited. Therefore, the aims of this study were to assess species and size composition of the target tuna species, as well as the diversity of bycatch species in whale and whale shark associated sets. Whale associated sets were found to be very similar to free school sets in terms of tuna catch (large yellowfin tuna), bycatch occurrence (presence in half the sets) and species assemblage (alpha and beta diversity). Whale shark associated sets were intermediate between FAD and free school sets, with tuna catch (skipjack and juvenile yellowfin) closer to FAD than to free school sets. However, the presence of large yellowfin, the bycatch composition (with almost no finfish, abundantly captured in FAD sets) and the species assemblage showed similarity with free school sets. This study highlights the need for an EAFM in the tuna purse-seine fishery by providing knowledge on pelagic multi-specific catches and bycatches.  
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  ISSN 0960-3115 ISBN Médium  
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Auteur Escalle, L.; Murua, H.; Amande, J.M.; Arregui, I.; Chavance, P.; Delgado de Molina, A.; Gaertner, D.; Fraile, I.; Filmalter, J.D.; Santiago, J.; Forget, F.; Arrizabalaga, H.; Dagorn, L.; Mérigot, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Post-capture survival of whale sharks encircled in tuna purse-seine nets: tagging and safe release methods Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Conserv: Mar. Freshw. Ecosyst.  
  Volume 25 Numéro 4 Pages (down) 433-447  
  Mots-Clés mega fauna; post-release mortality; Psat; Rhincodon typus; tropical tuna purse-seine  
  Résumé 1. Whale shark, the world's largest fish, is believed to be particularly vulnerable owing to its biological characteristics (slow growth, late maturation, great longevity) and is listed as Vulnerable by IUCN and included in Appendix II of CITES. 2. Whale sharks are occasionally encircled in tropical tuna purse-seine nets, throughout this global fishery. Although apparent immediate survival rates following encirclement and release have recently been assessed through scientific onboard observer programmes, a more rigorous methodology is still required for studying post-released survival. 3. This work provides a method for applying pop-up satellite tags and reports an enhanced release procedure for whale sharks. The first assessment of survival after release from purse-seine nets involved six whale sharks tagged between May and September 2014 in the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean. Five tags transmitted data: three popped up as programmed (after 30 days), while two surfaced prematurely (one after 21 and the other after 71 days (programmed to pop off after 30 and 90 days, respectively)) but showed no sign of unusual behaviour. 4. Overall, whale sharks survived at least 21 days (one at least 71 days) after release from purse-seine nets. These observations based on five large individuals (total length > 8 m), suggest that whale sharks have a good chance of survival when released with the proposed method. 5. Additional tagging in this and other oceans, especially of juveniles which may be more sensitive to encirclement and release operations, is essential to further assess whale shark post-release survival rates in tuna purse-seine fisheries. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1099-0755 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1547  
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Auteur Poisson, F.; Abascal Crespo, F.; Ellis, J.R.; Chavance, P.; Pascal, B.; Santos, M.N.; Seret, B.; Korta, M.; Coelho, R.; Ariz, J.; Murua, H. doi  openurl
  Titre Technical mitigation measures for sharks and rays in fisheries for tuna and tuna-like species: turning possibility into reality Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Living Resour.  
  Volume 29 Numéro 4 Pages (down) 402  
  Mots-Clés at-vessel mortality; Bycatch; california recreational fishery; circle hooks; eastern pacific-ocean; Elasmobranch; great-barrier-reef; j-hook performance; Mitigation; mortality; pelagic; pelagic longline fishery; postrelease survival; Purse seine fishery; rare-earth-metal; tuna regional fishery management organizations  
  Résumé Tuna fisheries have been identified as one of the major threats to populations of other marine vertebrates, including sea turtles, sharks, seabirds and marine mammals. The development of technical mitigation measures (MM) in fisheries is part of the code of conduct for responsible fisheries. An in-depth analysis of the available literature regarding bycatch mitigation in tuna fisheries with special reference to elasmobranchs was undertaken. Studies highlighting promising MMs were reviewed for four tuna fisheries (longline, purse seine, driftnets and gillnet, and rod and line – including recreational fisheries). The advantages and disadvantages of different MMs are discussed and assessed based on current scientific knowledge. Current management measures for sharks and rays in tuna Regional Fishery Management Organizations (t-RFMOs) are presented. A review of relevant studies examining at-vessel and postrelease mortality of elasmobranch bycatch is provided. This review aims to help fisheries managers identify pragmatic solutions to reduce mortality on pelagic elasmobranchs (and other higher vertebrates) whilst minimizing impacts on catches of target tuna species. Recent research efforts have identified several effective MMs that, if endorsed by t-RFMOs, could reduce elasmobranchs mortality rate in international tropical purse seine tuna fisheries. In the case of longline fisheries, the number of operational effective MMs is very limited. Fisheries deploying driftnets in pelagic ecosystems are suspected to have a high elasmobranchs bycatch and their discard survival is uncertain, but no effective MMs have been field validated for these fisheries. The precautionary bans of such gear by the EU and by some t-RFMOs seem therefore appropriate. Recreational tuna fisheries should be accompanied by science-based support to reduce potential negative impacts on shark populations. Priorities for research and management are identified and discussed.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0990-7440 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2056  
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Auteur Dagorn, L.; Holland, K.N.; Restrepo, V.; Moreno, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Is it good or bad to fish with FADs? What are the real impacts of the use of drifting FADs on pelagic marine ecosystems? Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish And Fisheries  
  Volume 14 Numéro 3 Pages (down) 391-415  
  Mots-Clés by-catch; ecological trap; Fad; purse seine; tuna  
  Résumé The use of fish aggregating devices (FADs) by purse seine fisheries has come under increasing criticism for its potential deleterious impacts on tuna stocks, for high levels of by-catch and threats to the biodiversity of tropical pelagic ecosystems. Here, we review the current state of scientific knowledge of this fishing technique and current management strategies. Our intent is to encourage objective discussion of the topic and highlight areas worthy of future research. We show that catching juvenile tuna around FADs does not necessarily result in overfishing of stocks, although more selective fishing techniques would likely help obtain higher yield. Levels of non-tuna by-catch are comparable to or less than in other commercial tuna fisheries and are primarily comprised of species that are not considered threatened. Accordingly, to minimize impacts on ecosystem balance, there is merit in considering that all species captured in purse seine fisheries (excluding vulnerable species such as turtles and sharks) should be retained, but the consequences of such a measure should be carefully examined before implementation. The take of vulnerable species could be further reduced by introduction of additional mitigation measures, but their potential benefits would be limited without parallel efforts with other gears. Finally, there is no unequivocal empirical evidence that FADs represent an ‘ecological trap’ that inherently disrupts tuna biology although further research should focus on this issue. We encourage RFMOs to expand and improve their FAD management plans. Under appropriate management regimes, FAD fishing could be an ecologically and economically sensible fishing method.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1467-2979 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 256  
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Auteur Bodin, N.; Lesperance, D.; Albert, R.; Hollanda, S.; Michaud, P.; Degroote, M.; Churlaud, C.; Bustamante, P. doi  openurl
  Titre Trace elements in oceanic pelagic communities in the western Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Chemosphere  
  Volume 174 Numéro Pages (down) 354-362  
  Mots-Clés atlantic-ocean; blue marlin; Environmental risk assessment; makaira-nigricans; Marine fish; Mediterranean Sea; Mercury; mercury content; North Pacific; risk-assessment; Seafood; Selenium; swordfish xiphias-gladius; Tuna fisheries' bycatch  
  Résumé The mineral composition of target and non-target pelagic fish caught by purse-seiners and longliners in the western-central Indian Ocean was determined. From the 10 essential elements analysed, selenium and zinc showed the highest concentrations in swordfish and blue marlin while Indian mackerel appeared as a good source of copper, iron and chrome. All catch had levels of lead and cadmium, two toxic elements, below the maximum sanitary limits. Although some concerns were raised regarding mercury concentrations in the largest species (wahoo, swordfish and blue marlin), molar ratios of mercury and selenium indicate that all oceanic pelagic fish from the western-central Indian Ocean are safe for human consumption. This study also gives insights on the relationships between the levels of essential and toxic elements in fish muscle and the size, trophic position and diet sources of the studied pelagic species. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  ISSN 0045-6535 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2119  
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