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Auteur (up) Capello, M.; Deneubourg, J.L.; Robert, M.; Holland, K.N.; Schaefer, K.M.; Dagorn, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Population assessment of tropical tuna based on their associative behavior around floating objects Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep  
  Volume 6 Numéro Pages 36415  
  Mots-Clés abundance; aerial surveys; archival tag data; bluefin tuna; continental-shelf; fish aggregating devices; katsuwonus-pelamis; pacific-ocean; tagging data; thunnus-albacares  
  Résumé Estimating the abundance of pelagic fish species is a challenging task, due to their vast and remote habitat. Despite the development of satellite, archival and acoustic tagging techniques that allow the tracking of marine animals in their natural environments, these technologies have so far been underutilized in developing abundance estimations. We developed a new method for estimating the abundance of tropical tuna that employs these technologies and exploits the aggregative behavior of tuna around floating objects (FADs). We provided estimates of abundance indices based on a simulated set of tagged fish and studied the sensitivity of our method to different association dynamics, FAD numbers, population sizes and heterogeneities of the FAD-array. Taking the case study of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) acoustically-tagged in Hawaii, we implemented our approach on field data and derived for the first time the ratio between the associated and the total population. With more extensive and long-term monitoring of FAD-associated tunas and good estimates of the numbers of fish at FADs, our method could provide fisheries-independent estimates of populations of tropical tuna. The same approach can be applied to obtain population assessments for any marine and terrestrial species that display associative behavior and from which behavioral data have been acquired using acoustic, archival or satellite tags.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1682  
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Auteur (up) Dagorn, L.; Holland, K.N.; Filmalter, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Are drifting FADs essential for testing the ecological trap hypothesis ? Type Article scientifique
  Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Research  
  Volume 106 Numéro Pages 60-63  
  Mots-Clés ecological; Fad; hypothesis; trap; Tunas  
  Résumé Because tropical tunas are known to aggregate around floating objects, it has been suggested that the large number of drifting fish aggregating devices (FADS) built and deployed by purse seiners could act as an 'ecological trap'. This hypothesis states that these networks of drifting FADS could take fish to areas where they would not normally go or retain them in places that they would otherwise leave. Because the ecological trap hypothesis was first advanced for drifting FADs, some have argued that only studies using drifting FADs can test this hypothesis. However, because working with drifting FADs is difficult, accepting this precept would preclude the scientific community from providing urgently needed information to organizations charged with management of fisheries that exploit drifting FADs. We argue that because both anchored and drifting FADs alter the natural environment, the more easily accessible anchored FADs can be used to test the ecological trap hypothesis. Also, based on a comparative scientific approach, we argue that understanding the behaviour of tunas around anchored FADs can improve our general understanding of tunas around all types of floating objects and help design new, well focused studies for drifting FADs. As anchored FADs are easier to access and offer a greater potential for research, we encourage scientists to design and conduct studies (in particular on the behaviour of fish at FADS) around the moored structures.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 66  
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Auteur (up) Dagorn, L.; Holland, K.N.; Restrepo, V.; Moreno, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Is it good or bad to fish with FADs? What are the real impacts of the use of drifting FADs on pelagic marine ecosystems? Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish And Fisheries  
  Volume 14 Numéro 3 Pages 391-415  
  Mots-Clés by-catch; ecological trap; Fad; purse seine; tuna  
  Résumé The use of fish aggregating devices (FADs) by purse seine fisheries has come under increasing criticism for its potential deleterious impacts on tuna stocks, for high levels of by-catch and threats to the biodiversity of tropical pelagic ecosystems. Here, we review the current state of scientific knowledge of this fishing technique and current management strategies. Our intent is to encourage objective discussion of the topic and highlight areas worthy of future research. We show that catching juvenile tuna around FADs does not necessarily result in overfishing of stocks, although more selective fishing techniques would likely help obtain higher yield. Levels of non-tuna by-catch are comparable to or less than in other commercial tuna fisheries and are primarily comprised of species that are not considered threatened. Accordingly, to minimize impacts on ecosystem balance, there is merit in considering that all species captured in purse seine fisheries (excluding vulnerable species such as turtles and sharks) should be retained, but the consequences of such a measure should be carefully examined before implementation. The take of vulnerable species could be further reduced by introduction of additional mitigation measures, but their potential benefits would be limited without parallel efforts with other gears. Finally, there is no unequivocal empirical evidence that FADs represent an ‘ecological trap’ that inherently disrupts tuna biology although further research should focus on this issue. We encourage RFMOs to expand and improve their FAD management plans. Under appropriate management regimes, FAD fishing could be an ecologically and economically sensible fishing method.  
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  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1467-2979 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 256  
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Auteur (up) Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Albouy, C.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecological traits shape genetic diversity patterns across the Mediterranean Sea: a quantitative review on fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 43 Numéro 4 Pages 845-857  
  Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; bass dicentrarchus-labrax; climate-change; cod gadus-morhua; ecological traits; effective population-size; genetic diversity; gilthead sea; life-history traits; marine fishes; marine populations; Mediterranean Sea; microsatellite markers; microsatellites; mitochondrial; mitochondrial DNA; molecular markers; population genetics  
  Résumé AimWe set out to identify the determinants of the variation in genetic diversity among fish species and test whether multi-species genetic diversity is randomly distributed in space. LocationMediterranean Sea. MethodsWe collected genetic diversity data from 39 published studies on Mediterranean fishes (31 species) along with the spatial coordinates of the sampling sites. We focused on microsatellite heterozygosity (151 data points) and mitochondrial haplotype diversity (201 data points). We used linear regressions to link genetic diversity and 11 ecological traits. We also tested for spatial autocorrelation and trends in the residuals. ResultsAmong-species variation in microsatellite heterozygosity was explained by three ecological traits: vertical distribution, migration type and body length. Variation in mitochondrial haplotype diversity was also explained by vertical distribution and migration type, and by reproductive strategy (semelparity). However, vertical distribution and migration type showed opposite effects on microsatellites and mitochondrial diversity. After accounting for the effects of ecological traits, no spatial pattern was detected, except for one of the species considered. Main conclusionsEcological factors explain an important proportion of the among-species genetic diversity. These results suggest that life history strategies of the species influence the variation of microsatellite diversity indirectly through their effect on effective population size, while the spatial variations of genetic diversity seem to be too complex to be identified in our analysis. We found very different effects of traits on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA diversity, which can be explained by the specificities of mitochondrial DNA (absence of recombination, maternal inheritance and non-neutrality).  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1627  
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Auteur (up) Darnaude, A.M.; Hunter, E. doi  openurl
  Titre Validation of otolith delta O-18 values as effective natural tags for shelf-scale geolocation of migrating fish Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 598 Numéro Pages 167-185  
  Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; carbon stable-isotopes; cod gadus-morhua; Fish migration; life-history; Natural tag; north-sea plaice; Oxygen; oxygen-isotope fractionation; Plaice; Pleuronectes platessa; pleuronectes-platessa l; population regulation; Site fidelity; Stable isotopes; stock structure; western-australia  
  Résumé The oxygen isotopic ratio of fish otoliths is increasingly used as a 'natural tag' to assess provenance in migratory species, with the assumption that variations in delta O-18 values closely reflect individual ambient experience of temperature and/or salinity. We employed archival tag data and otoliths collected from a shelf-scale study of the spatial dynamics of North Sea plaice Pleuronectes platessa L., to examine the limits of otolith delta O-18-based geolocation of fish during their annual migrations. Detailed intra-annual otolith delta O-18 measurements for 1997-1999 from individuals of 3 distinct sub-stocks with different spawning locations were compared with delta O-18 values predicted at the monthly, seasonal and annual scales, using predicted sub-stock specific temperatures and salinities over the same years. Spatio-temporal variation in expected delta O-18 values (-0.23 to 2.94%) mainly reflected variation in temperature, and among-zone discrimination potential using otolith delta O-18 varied greatly by temporal scale and by time of year. Measured otolith delta O-18 values (-0.71 to 3.09%) largely mirrored seasonally predicted values, but occasionally fell outside expected delta O-18 ranges. Where mismatches were observed, differences among sub-stocks were consistently greater than predicted, suggesting that in plaice, differential sub-stock growth rates and physiological effects during oxygen fractionation enhance geolocation potential using otolith delta O-18. Comparing intra-annual delta O-18 values over several consecutive years for individuals with contrasted migratory patterns corroborated a high degree of feeding and spawning site fidelity irrespective of the sub-stock. Informed interpretation of otolith delta O-18 values can therefore provide relatively detailed fisheries-relevant data not readily obtained by conventional means.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2377  
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