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Auteur (up) Keller, S.; Quetglas, A.; Puerta, P.; Bitetto, I.; Casciaro, L.; Cuccu, D.; Esteban, A.; Garcia, C.; Garofalo, G.; Guijarro, B.; Josephides, M.; Jadaud, A.; Lefkaditou, E.; Maiorano, P.; Manfredi, C.; Marceta, B.; Micallef, R.; Peristeraki, P.; Relini, G.; Sartor, P.; Spedicato, M.T.; Tserpes, G.; Hidalgo, M. doi  openurl
  Titre Environmentally driven synchronies of Mediterranean cephalopod populations Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Prog. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 152 Numéro Pages 1-14  
  Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; balearic sea; Cephalopods; Dynamic factor analysis; ecological niche approach; fisheries; fluctuations; hake merluccius-merluccius; Illex coindetii; life-history; Mediterranean; medits; octopus; Octopus vulgaris; squid; Synchrony; time-series  
  Résumé The Mediterranean Sea is characterized by large scale gradients of temperature, productivity and salinity, in addition to pronounced mesoscale differences. Such a heterogeneous system is expected to shape the population dynamics of marine species. On the other hand, prevailing environmental and climatic conditions at whole basin scale may force spatially distant populations to fluctuate in synchrony. Cephalopods are excellent case studies to test these hypotheses owing to their high sensitivity to environmental conditions. Data of two cephalopod species with contrasting life histories (benthic octopus vs nectobenthic squid), obtained from scientific surveys carried out throughout the Mediterranean during the last 20 years were analyzed. The objectives of this study and the methods used to achieve them (in parentheses) were: (i) to investigate synchronies in spatially separated populations (decorrelation analysis); (ii) detect underlying common abundance trends over distant regions (dynamic factor analysis, DFA); and (iii) analyse putative influences of key environmental drivers such as productivity and sea surface temperature on the population dynamics at regional scale (general linear models, GLM). In accordance with their contrasting spatial mobility, the distance from where synchrony could no longer be detected (decorrelation scale) was higher in squid than in octopus (349 vs 217 km); for comparison, the maximum distance between locations was 2620 km. The DFA revealed a general increasing trend in the abundance of both species in most areas, which agrees with the already reported worldwide proliferation of cephalopods. DFA results also showed that population dynamics are more similar in the eastern than in the western Mediterranean basin. According to the GLM models, cephalopod populations were negatively affected by productivity, which would be explained by an increase of competition and predation by fishes. While warmer years coincided with declining octopus numbers, areas of high sea surface temperature showed higher densities of squid. Our results are relevant for regional fisheries management and demonstrate that the regionalisation objectives envisaged under the new Common Fishery Policy may not be adequate for Mediterranean cephalopod stocks. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2132  
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Auteur (up) Lefevre, S.; Mckenzie, D.J.; Nilsson, G.E. doi  openurl
  Titre Models projecting the fate of fish populations under climate change need to be based on valid physiological mechanisms Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.  
  Volume 23 Numéro 9 Pages 3449-3459  
  Mots-Clés aerobic scope; coryphaena-hippurus; energy-demand teleosts; gadus-morhua l; gill surface area; growth; makaira-nigricans; marlin tetrapturus-albidus; metabolism; metabolism-size relationship; oxygen consumption; oxygen-consumption; ram ventilation; Respiration; scaling; swimming performance; tuna katsuwonus-pelamis  
  Résumé Some recent modelling papers projecting smaller fish sizes and catches in a warmer future are based on erroneous assumptions regarding (i) the scaling of gills with body mass and (ii) the energetic cost of 'maintenance'. Assumption (i) posits that insurmountable geometric constraints prevent respiratory surface areas from growing as fast as body volume. It is argued that these constraints explain allometric scaling of energy metabolism, whereby larger fishes have relatively lower mass-specific metabolic rates. Assumption (ii) concludes that when fishes reach a certain size, basal oxygen demands will not be met, because of assumption (i). We here demonstrate unequivocally, by applying accepted physiological principles with reference to the existing literature, that these assumptions are not valid. Gills are folded surfaces, where the scaling of surface area to volume is not constrained by spherical geometry. The gill surface area can, in fact, increase linearly in proportion to gill volume and body mass. We cite the large body of evidence demonstrating that respiratory surface areas in fishes reflect metabolic needs, not vice versa, which explains the large interspecific variation in scaling of gill surface areas. Finally, we point out that future studies basing their predictions on models should incorporate factors for scaling of metabolic rate and for temperature effects on metabolism, which agree with measured values, and should account for interspecific variation in scaling and temperature effects. It is possible that some fishes will become smaller in the future, but to make reliable predictions the underlying mechanisms need to be identified and sought elsewhere than in geometric constraints on gill surface area. Furthermore, to ensure that useful information is conveyed to the public and policymakers about the possible effects of climate change, it is necessary to improve communication and congruity between fish physiologists and fisheries scientists.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2169  
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Auteur (up) Lopez, J.; Moreno, G.; Lennert-Cody, C.; Maunder, M.; Sancristobal, I.; Caballero, A.; Dagorn, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Environmental preferences of tuna and non-tuna species associated with drifting fish aggregating devices (DFADs) in the Atlantic Ocean, ascertained through fishers' echo-sounder buoys Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 140 Numéro Pages 127-138  
  Mots-Clés behavior; catch rates; Echo-sounder buoy; Environmental preferences; equatorial atlantic; fad; floating objects; french-polynesia; gamm; habitat; pacific-ocean; Pelagic fish; Purse seine; thunnus-albacares; Tropical tuna; Tuna; western indian-ocean  
  Résumé Understanding the relationship between environmental variables and pelagic species concentrations and dynamics is helpful to improve fishery management, especially in a changing environment. Drifting fish aggregating device (DFAD)-associated tuna and non-tuna biomass data from the fishers' echo-sounder buoys operating in the Atlantic Ocean have been modelled as functions of oceanographic (Sea Surface Temperature, Chlorophyll-a, Salinity, Sea Level Anomaly, Thermocline depth and gradient, Geostrophic current, Total Current, Depth) and DFAD variables (DFAD speed, bearing and soak time) using Generalized Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs). Biological interaction (presence of non-tuna species at DFADs) was also included in the tuna model, and found to be significant at this time scale. All variables were included in the analyses but only some of them were highly significant, and variable significance differed among fish groups. In general, most of the fish biomass distribution was explained by the ocean productivity and DFAD-variables. Indeed, this study revealed different environmental preferences for tunas and non-tuna species and suggested the existence of active habitat selection. This improved assessment of environmental and DFAD effects on tuna and non-tuna catchability in the purse seine tuna fishery will contribute to transfer of better scientific advice to regional tuna commissions for the management and conservation of exploited resources.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2177  
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Auteur (up) Lucena Frédou, F.; Frédou, T.; Gaertner, D.; Kell, L.; Potier, M.; Bach, P.; Travassos, P.; Hazin, F.; Ménard, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Life history traits and fishery patterns of teleosts caught by the tuna longline fishery in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Research  
  Volume 179 Numéro Pages 308-321  
  Mots-Clés Bycatch; Fishing impact; Tuna; Billfish; Ecosystem based fisheries management  
  Résumé The identification and mitigation of adverse effects of the bycatch of tuna longline fishery have been mainly developed and implemented for seabirds, sharks and turtles and, the knowledge on teleost bycatch for this fishery, remains very poor. This paper contributes to a comprehensive assessment of life history traits and fishery attributes of target and bycatch species caught by the tuna longline fishery in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Data was compiled on seven life history traits and three fishery attributes for 33 and 27 teleost stocks caught by longliners in South Atlantic and Indian Oceans, respectively. In addition, each species was assigned into four categories describing the fate of the catch: target species for commercial use, bycatch species kept for consumption, bycatch species kept for commercial use and discarded bycatch. Life history traits and fishery attributes did not differ between oceans. However, non-target but commercialized species were smaller in the Atlantic Ocean. Teleosts caught by the tuna longline fishery was segregated into three main groups: (1) the fast growing species represented mainly by dolphinfishes (Coryphaena hippurus and C. equisellis), skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis), kawakawa (Euthynnus affinis), bullet tuna (Auxis rochei), snoek (Thyrsites atun) and blackfin tuna (Thunnus atlanticus); (2) target tunas and most other bycatch species which were part of an intermediate group and (3) billfishes including swordfish representing the large and slow growing species with moderate to high market values and unknown or highly uncertain stock status. Investment in some key life history traits (such as growth coefficient) and the development of quantitative or semi-quantitative approaches (stock assessment and Ecological Risk Assessment) should be priorized as precautionary management measures for these species.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2405  
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Auteur (up) Mariani, P.; Křivan, V.; MacKenzie, B.R.; Mullon, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre The migration game in habitat network: the case of tuna Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Theor Ecol  
  Volume 9 Numéro 2 Pages 219-232  
  Mots-Clés Bluefin tuna; Game theory; Habitat selection; Ideal free distribution; Plant Sciences; Structured population; Theoretical Ecology/Statistics; Zoology  
  Résumé Long-distance migration is a widespread process evolved independently in several animal groups in terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Many factors contribute to the migration process and of primary importance are intra-specific competition and seasonality in the resource distribution. Adaptive migration in direction of increasing fitness should lead to the ideal free distribution (IFD) which is the evolutionary stable strategy of the habitat selection game. We introduce a migration game which focuses on migrating dynamics leading to the IFD for age-structured populations and in time varying habitats, where dispersal is costly. The model predicts migration dynamics between these habitats and the corresponding population distribution. When applied to Atlantic bluefin tunas, it predicts their migration routes and their seasonal distribution. The largest biomass is located in the spawning areas which have also the largest diversity in the age-structure. Distant feeding areas are occupied on a seasonal base and often by larger individuals, in agreement with empirical observations. Moreover, we show that only a selected number of migratory routes emerge as those effectively used by tunas.  
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  ISSN 1874-1738, 1874-1746 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1465  
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