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Auteur (up) Dueri, S.; Maury, O. doi  openurl
  Titre Modelling the effect of marine protected areas on the population of skipjack tuna in the Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Living Resources  
  Volume 26 Numéro Pages 171-178  
  Mots-Clés Chagos MPA; fishery management; Fishery scenarios; marine reserves; null; Tropical tuna  
  Résumé The benefits of implementing no-take Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) for the conservation of highly migratory species are not easy to assess. They depend on several factors, such as the fish mobility, fisher behaviour and the area covered by the MPA with respect to the distribution area of the species to protect. In this study, we explore the simultaneous effects of MPAs and fishing scenarios on skipjack tuna population dynamics, using the spatially-explicit APECOSM-E model. The model represents the size-structured population dynamics of skipjack tuna in the Indian Ocean and their dependence on climatic variability and exploitation by fisheries. Numerical experiments were run from the beginning of industrial fisheries in the early 1980s to the year 2030, considering different scenarios for the future development of fisheries. These scenarios combined different trends in fishing effort and technological development, either assuming a continuous increase following historical trends or a stabilization of these factors at present values. The simulations were designed to explore the effects of two MPAs of different size and location: the recently established Chagos MPA, and a hypothetical MPA covering a large part of the Western Indian Ocean, where most of the skipjack catches are presently made. We modelled the redistribution of fishing effort around the MPAs assuming that the fishers had partial knowledge of the spatial distribution of the skipjack population. The effects of the two MPAs on the population dynamics, catch and fishing mortality are shown. Our results revealed a very minor effect of the Chagos MPA on the skipjack tuna population, while the Western Indian Ocean MPA had an important impact on the fishing mortality and succeeded in stabilizing the spawning population. The simulations also showed that the effect of an MPA depends on the evolution of fisheries and it is therefore important to explore different fishery scenarios to assess the future benefits of an MPA.  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 257  
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Auteur (up) Escalle, L.; Gaertner, D.; Chavance, P.; Delgado de Molina, A.; Ariz, J.; Mérigot, B. doi  openurl
  Titre Forecasted consequences of simulated FAD moratoria in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans on catches and bycatches Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 74 Numéro 3 Pages 780-792  
  Mots-Clés area; Bycatch; ecosystem approach to fisheries; fish aggregation device; management; Megafauna; Monte Carlo simulations; Purse-seine fishery; time; time-area restriction; tropical tuna purse-seine fishery; Tuna  
  Résumé Given the increasingly extensive use of drifting fish aggregation devices (FADs) by the purse-seine fisheries targeting tropical tunas, fishing effort restrictions have been introduced to manage tropical tuna stocks. However, these measures are focused on the protection of juvenile tunas and do not take account of the potential impact on bycatch or associated megafauna (whales and whale sharks). An iterative “fishing-day” Monte Carlo simulation model was developed to investigate the consequences on tropical tunas and bycatch of introducing extensive area 6-month moratoria on FAD activities. The model allowed for variability in a range of plausible values of the parameters characterizing the fishing operations conducted by European purse-seiners in the eastern tropical Atlantic and western Indian Oceans for the period 2005-2014. Monte Carlo simulations, using probabilities based on these fishery data, were carried out for the French and Spanish fishing fleets separately to account for differences in fishing strategies. The models predicted a decrease in FAD sets and an increase in free school sets. As a consequence, the catch of small tuna (<10 kg) decreased while the catch of large tuna (>= 10 kg) increased, leading to an overall increase in tuna catch of 100-200 tons/year/vessel in the Atlantic Ocean, and a decrease of 400-1500 tons/year/vessel in the Indian Ocean. The bycatch decreased in the Indian Ocean, while in the Atlantic Ocean billfishes, turtles and chondrichthyans bycatch increased slightly and other bony fishes decreased. Because fishing practices were modified, whale and whale shark associated sets increased slightly in the Indian Ocean.  
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  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2105  
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Auteur (up) Escalle, L.; Gaertner, D.; Chavance, P.; Murua, H.; Simier, M.; Jose Pascual-Alayon, P.; Menard, F.; Ruiz, J.; Abascal, F.; Mérigot, B. doi  openurl
  Titre Catch and bycatch captured by tropical tuna purse-seine fishery in whale and whale shark associated sets: comparison with free school and FAD sets Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Biodivers. Conserv.  
  Volume 28 Numéro 2 Pages 467-499  
  Mots-Clés diversity; mortality; atlantic; biology; Bycatch; strategies; Megafauna; behavior; dominance; yellowfin; Catch composition; Diversity; Ecosystem approach to fisheries management; swimming speeds; Tuna purse-seine fishery  
  Résumé In an ecosystem approach to fisheries management (EAFM) framework of the tuna purse-seine fishery, the assessment of target species, but also that of bycatch species, is essential. In the Atlantic and Indian oceans, purse-seine nets are sometimes set around tuna schools associated with whale sharks and baleen whales, although less frequently than around free-swimming tuna schools or those associated with fish aggregating devices (FAD). However, knowledge on the targeted catch and bycatch in these megafauna associated fishing sets is still relatively limited. Therefore, the aims of this study were to assess species and size composition of the target tuna species, as well as the diversity of bycatch species in whale and whale shark associated sets. Whale associated sets were found to be very similar to free school sets in terms of tuna catch (large yellowfin tuna), bycatch occurrence (presence in half the sets) and species assemblage (alpha and beta diversity). Whale shark associated sets were intermediate between FAD and free school sets, with tuna catch (skipjack and juvenile yellowfin) closer to FAD than to free school sets. However, the presence of large yellowfin, the bycatch composition (with almost no finfish, abundantly captured in FAD sets) and the species assemblage showed similarity with free school sets. This study highlights the need for an EAFM in the tuna purse-seine fishery by providing knowledge on pelagic multi-specific catches and bycatches.  
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  ISSN 0960-3115 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2482  
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Auteur (up) Escalle, L.; Murua, H.; Amande, J.M.; Arregui, I.; Chavance, P.; Delgado de Molina, A.; Gaertner, D.; Fraile, I.; Filmalter, J.D.; Santiago, J.; Forget, F.; Arrizabalaga, H.; Dagorn, L.; Mérigot, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Post-capture survival of whale sharks encircled in tuna purse-seine nets: tagging and safe release methods Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Conserv: Mar. Freshw. Ecosyst.  
  Volume 25 Numéro 4 Pages 433-447  
  Mots-Clés mega fauna; post-release mortality; Psat; Rhincodon typus; tropical tuna purse-seine  
  Résumé 1. Whale shark, the world's largest fish, is believed to be particularly vulnerable owing to its biological characteristics (slow growth, late maturation, great longevity) and is listed as Vulnerable by IUCN and included in Appendix II of CITES. 2. Whale sharks are occasionally encircled in tropical tuna purse-seine nets, throughout this global fishery. Although apparent immediate survival rates following encirclement and release have recently been assessed through scientific onboard observer programmes, a more rigorous methodology is still required for studying post-released survival. 3. This work provides a method for applying pop-up satellite tags and reports an enhanced release procedure for whale sharks. The first assessment of survival after release from purse-seine nets involved six whale sharks tagged between May and September 2014 in the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean. Five tags transmitted data: three popped up as programmed (after 30 days), while two surfaced prematurely (one after 21 and the other after 71 days (programmed to pop off after 30 and 90 days, respectively)) but showed no sign of unusual behaviour. 4. Overall, whale sharks survived at least 21 days (one at least 71 days) after release from purse-seine nets. These observations based on five large individuals (total length > 8 m), suggest that whale sharks have a good chance of survival when released with the proposed method. 5. Additional tagging in this and other oceans, especially of juveniles which may be more sensitive to encirclement and release operations, is essential to further assess whale shark post-release survival rates in tuna purse-seine fisheries. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.  
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  ISSN 1099-0755 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1547  
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Auteur (up) Filmalter, J.D.; Cowley, P.D.; Potier, M.; Menard, F.; Smale, M.J.; Cherel, Y.; Dagorn, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Feeding ecology of silky sharks Carcharhinus falciformis associated with floating objects in the western Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Fish Biol.  
  Volume 90 Numéro 4 Pages 1321-1337  
  Mots-Clés atlantic; By-catch; diet; ecosystem; fad; fish aggregating devices; fish aggregation device; food-consumption; isurus-oxyrinchus; pacific-ocean; pelagic fishes; Pelagic shark; Purse-seine fishery; shortfin mako; Yellowfin tuna  
  Résumé The silky shark Carcharhinus falciformis is commonly associated with floating objects, including fish aggregating devices (FADs), in the Indian Ocean. While the motives for this associative behaviour are unclear, it does make them vulnerable to capture in the tuna purse seine fishery that makes extensive use of FADs. Here, the diet of 323 C. falciformis, caught at FADs in the Indian Ocean, was investigated to test the hypothesis that trophic benefits explain the associative behaviour. A high proportion of stomachs with fresh contents (57%) suggested that extensive feeding activity occurred while associated with FADs. Multiple dietary indices showed that typical non-associative prey types dominated, but were supplemented with fishes typically found at FADs. While the trophic benefits of FAD association may be substantial, our results suggest that associative behaviour is not driven solely by feeding. (C) 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles  
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  ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2142  
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