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Auteur (down) Van Beveren, E.; Fromentin, J.-M.; Bonhommeau, S.; Nieblas, A.-E.; Metral, L.; Brisset, B.; Jusup, M.; Bauer, R.K.; Brosset, P.; Saraux, C. doi  openurl
  Titre Predator-prey interactions in the face of management regulations: changes in Mediterranean small pelagic species are not due to increased tuna predation Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci.  
  Volume 74 Numéro 9 Pages 1422-1430  
  Mots-Clés anchovy engraulis-encrasicolus; atlantic bluefin tuna; Energy density; fish condition; fisheries; food-consumption; Proximate composition; sea; thunnus-thynnus; Yellowfin tuna  
  Résumé Recently, the abundance of young Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) tripled in the northwestern Mediterranean following effective management measures. We investigated whether its predation on sardine (Sardina pilchardus) and anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) could explain their concurrent size and biomass decline, which caused a fishery crisis. Combining the observed diet composition of bluefin tuna, their modelled daily energy requirements, their population size, and the abundance of prey species in the area, we calculated the proportion of the prey populations that were consumed by bluefin tuna annually over 2011-2013. To assess whether tuna could alter the size structure of the three small pelagic fish populations (anchovy, sardine, and sprat (Sprattus sprattus)), the size distributions of the consumed prey species were compared with those of the wild populations. We estimated that the annual consumption of small pelagic fish by bluefin tuna is less than 2% of the abundance of these populations. Furthermore, size selectivity patterns were not observed. We thus concluded that tuna predation is unlikely to be the main cause of major changes in the small pelagic fish populations from this area.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0706-652x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2195  
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Auteur (down) Travassos Tolotti, M.; Filmalter, J.D.; Bach, P.; Travassos, P.; Seret, B.; Dagorn, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Banning is not enough: The complexities of oceanic shark management by tuna regional fisheries management organizations Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Conservation  
  Volume 4 Numéro Pages 1-7  
  Mots-Clés Bycatch; conservation; Fin trade; Pelagic shark; Tuna fisheries  
  Résumé Recently, declining populations of several pelagic shark species have led to global conservation concerns surrounding this group. As a result, a series of species-specific banning measures have been implemented by Regional Fishery Management Organizations (RFMOs) in charge of tuna fisheries, which include retention bans, finning bans and trading bans. There are both positive and negative aspects to most management measures, but generally, the positive aspects outweigh the negatives, ensuring the measure is beneficial to the resource and its users in the long term. Banning measures are a good first step towards the conservation of pelagic shark species, especially since they improve conservation awareness among fishers, managers and the public. Measures that impose total bans, however, can lead to negative impacts that may jeopardize the populations they were intended to protect. The majority of pelagic shark catches are incidental and most sharks die before they reach the vessel or after they are released. The legislation set out by RFMOs only prevents retention but not the actual capture or the mortality that may occur as a result. Managers should be fully aware that the development and implementation of mitigation measures are critical for a more effective conservation strategy.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2351-9894 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1498  
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Auteur (down) Torres-Irineo, E.; Gaertner, D.; Molina, A.D. de; Ariz, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Effects of time-area closure on tropical tuna purse-seine fleet dynamics through some fishery indicators Type Article scientifique
  Année 2011 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquatic Living Resources  
  Volume 24 Numéro 4 Pages 337-350  
  Mots-Clés Fishery indicators; Fleet dynamics; Time-area closure; Tropical tuna  
  Résumé Time-area closures have become a frequently used tool to control fishing effort and protect feeding and spawning areas. However, because time-area closure strata are mainly based on biological and ecological considerations, and do not accounts for fishermen's behavior-at-sea, this type of regulation tool may not entirely achieve its objectives. With the aim of comparing the impact of two different time-area regulations: (1) a moratorium on Fish Aggregating Devices (FAD) sets (1997-2005) and (2) a no-take area for surface fleets (2005-2010) on the dynamics of the European (EU) tuna purse seine fleet operating in the eastern tropical Atlantic, several fishery indicators were evaluated through a Before-After, Control-Impact (BACI) approach. The results showed that prior to any regulation, the fleet used to be concentrated within the Gulf of Guinea area. During the first years of the moratorium on FAD (from November to January within a large region in the eastern Atlantic) there was a movement towards outside the protected area, increasing the total sets on FAD (restricted fishing activity). In general, this moratorium fulfilled its objectives; however, it was not respected during the last years of this regulation. The no-take time-area closure restricted all tuna catches for the surface fisheries but only in November and within a small area (i.e., the Picolo zone). As a result, there was an increase in activities on free schools outside the no-take area. Our findings suggest the use of some simple fishery indicators to understand fleet dynamics as a complement of ecological information before implementing new time area closures. Furthermore, since tunas are highly mobile species, anticipating the possible re-allocation of effort of purse seiners to adjacent areas in response to the spatial regulation is required to design different candidate time-area closures and to evaluate their effectiveness to protect juvenile tunas.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  ISSN 0990-7440 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 163  
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Auteur (down) Torres-Irineo, E.; Dreyfus-Leon, M.; Gaertner, D.; Salas, S.; Marchal, P. doi  openurl
  Titre Adaptive responses of tropical tuna purse-seiners under temporal regulations Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Ambio  
  Volume 46 Numéro 1 Pages 88-97  
  Mots-Clés atlantic; behavior; Closed season; eastern pacific-ocean; eastern tropical pacific; Fisher behaviour; Fisheries management; fishing strategies; fleet dynamics; mixed fisheries; model; Purse-seine fishing; state; trawlers; Tropical tuna  
  Résumé The failure to achieve fisheries management objectives has been broadly discussed in international meetings. Measuring the effects of fishery regulations is difficult due to the lack of detailed information. The yellowfin tuna fishery in the eastern Pacific Ocean offers an opportunity to evaluate the fishers' responses to temporal regulations. We used data from observers on-board Mexican purse-seine fleet, which is the main fleet fishing on dolphin-associated tuna schools. In 2002, the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission implemented a closed season to reduce fishing effort for this fishery. For the period 1992-2008, we analysed three fishery indicators using generalized estimating equations to evaluate the fishers' response to the closure. We found that purse-seiners decreased their time spent in port, increased their fishing sets, and maintained their proportion of successful fishing sets. Our results highlight the relevance of accounting for the fisher behaviour to understand fisheries dynamics when establishing management regulations.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0044-7447 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2072  
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Auteur (down) Sempo, G.; Dagorn, L.; Robert, M.; Deneubourg, J.-L. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Impact of increasing deployment of artificial floating objects on the spatial distribution of social fish species Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Applied Ecology  
  Volume 50 Numéro 5 Pages 1081-1092  
  Mots-Clés behaviour-based modelling; Bycatch; Fad; Fob; sustainable fishery; tuna  
  Résumé * Approximately 300 pelagic fish species naturally aggregate around floating objects (FOBs) at the surface of the oceans. Currently, more than 50% of the world catch of tropical tuna comes from the industrial tuna fisheries around drifting FOBs. Greater understanding of the complex decision-making processes leading to this aggregation pattern and the impact of the massive release of artificial FOBs by fishermen on the spatial distribution and management of tuna is needed. * We analyse how the interplay between social (relationships between individuals) and non-social (responses to the environment) behaviours may affect the spatial distribution of a population in a multi-FOB environment. Taking the example of tropical tunas associating with FOBs and using differential equations and stochastic simulations, we examine how, when increasing the number of FOBs, fish aggregation dynamics and the distribution of the population among patches are affected by the population size, level of sociality and the natural retentive and/or attractive forces of FOBs on individual tuna. * Our model predicts that, depending on the species' level of sociality, fish will be scattered among FOBs or aggregated around a single FOB based on the number of FOBs deployed in a homogeneous oceanic region. * For social species, we demonstrated that the total fish catch is reduced with increasing FOBs number. Indeed, for each size of population, there are a number of FOBs minimizing the total population of fish associated with FOBs and another number of FOBs maximizing the total population of associated fish. * Synthesis and applications. In terms of fisheries management, the total catch volume is directly linked to the total number of floating objects (FOBs) for non-social species, and any limit on the number of sets would then result in a limit on the total catch. For social species (e.g. tuna), however, increasing the number of FOBs does not necessarily lead to an increase in the total catch, which is a non-intuitive result. Indeed, our model shows that, for specific values of the parameters, deploying a greater number of FOBs in the water (all other parameters being constant) does not necessarily help fishermen to catch more tuna, but does increase the level of fishing effort and bycatch.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1365-2664 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 265  
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