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Auteur Bodin, N.; Chassot, E.; Sardenne, F.; Zudaire, I.; Grande, M.; Dhurmeea, Z.; Murua, H.; Barde, J.
Titre Ecological data for western Indian Ocean tuna Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology
Volume 99 Numéro 5 Pages 1245-1245
Mots-Clés energetics; fatty acids; lipids; morphometrics; multi-tissues; proteins; stable isotopes; trophic ecology; tropical marine ecosystems; tuna fisheries
Résumé Tuna are marine apex predators that inhabit the tropical and sub-tropical waters of the Indian Ocean where they support socially and economically important fisheries. Key component of pelagic communities, tuna are bioindicator species of anthropogenic and climate-induced changes through modifications of the structure and related energy-flow of food webs and ecosystems. The IndianEcoTuna dataset provides a panel of ecological tracers measured in four soft tissues (white muscle, red muscle, liver, gonads) from 1,364 individuals of four species, i.e., the albacore (ALB, Thunnus alalunga), the bigeye (BET, T. obesus), the skipjack (SKJ, Katsuwomus pelamis), and the yellowfin (YFT, T. albacares), collected throughout the western Indian Ocean from 2009 to 2015. Sampling was carried out during routine monitoring programs, at sea by observers onboard professional vessels or at landing. For each record, the type of fishing gear, the conservation mode, as well as the fishing date and catch location are provided. Individuals were sampled to span a wide range of body sizes: 565 ALB with fork length from 58 to 118 cm, 155 BET from 29.5 to 173 cm, 304 SKJ from 30 to 74 cm, and 340 YFT from 29 to 171.5 cm. The IndianEcoTuna dataset combines: (1) 9,512 records of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (percent element weights, δ13C and δ15N values) in 1,185 fish, (2) 887 concentrations of total proteins in 242 fish, (3) 8,356 concentrations of total lipids and three lipid classes (triacylglycerols TAG; phospholipids PL; sterols ST) in 695 fish, and (4) 1,150 and 1,033 profiles of neutral and polar fatty acids in 397 and 342 fish, respectively. Information on sex and weights of the whole fish, gonads, liver and stomach is provided. Because of the essential trophic role and wide-ranging of tuna in marine systems, and the large panel of tropho-energetic tracers and derived-key quantitative parameters provided (e.g., niche width, trophic position, condition indices), the IndianEcoTuna dataset should be of high interest for global and regional research on marine trophic ecology and food web analysis, as well as on the impacts of anthropogenic changes on Indian Ocean marine ecosystems. There are no copyright restrictions for research and/or teaching purposes. Usage of the dataset must include citation of this Data Paper.
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ISSN 1939-9170 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2373
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Auteur Gaertner, D.; Hallier, J.-P.
Titre Tag shedding by tropical tunas in the Indian Ocean and other factors affecting the shedding rate Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Fisheries Research Revue Abrégée
Volume 163 Numéro Si Pages 98-105
Mots-Clés averaging; Bayesian model; Beta-binomial model; Indian Ocean; Shedding rate; Tagging data; Tropical tunas
Résumé A key objective of the Regional Tuna Tagging Project Indian Ocean was to estimate tag-shedding rates, Type-I (immediate tag shedding) and Type-II (long-term tag shedding). To assess this, a series of double-tagging experiments (26,899 double tags released with 4555 recoveries) were conducted as part of the broader tagging program. After omitting data from tags placed by less experienced taggers, the results of our analyses did not show any evidence that individual differences between taggers (i.e., a tagger effect) impacted estimates of tag-shedding rates. However, it was shown that the probability of retaining the second tag (inserted in the left side of the fish) was larger than retaining the first tag (inserted in the right side, i.e., the side typically tagged in single-tagging experiments). We used a Bayesian model averaging approach to account for model uncertainty in the estimates of the parameters a and L used to calculate the probability of tag retention Q(t)= alpha e-((L t)) for the right tag. The parameter estimates were alpha = 0.993 and L (per year) = 0.030 (skipjack); alpha = 0.972 and L (per year) = 0.040 (yellowfin); and alpha = 0.990 and L (per year) = 0.021 (bigeye). These results agree with estimates obtained by other large-scale tropical tuna tagging projects. We showed that tag loss has a moderate impact on the underestimation of the exploitation rate (bias = 2-6% depending on the tuna species). However, non-reporting leads to a bias of around 7% when using the high reporting rate estimate of purse seiners. Finally, tag shedding (specifically Type-II shedding) modified the individual weights of the samples of recaptures. Consequently, the total instantaneous mortality estimates (Z; calculated from mean times-at-large) were reduced by a range of 1-3%.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur Murua, H.; Marsac, F.; Eveson, J.P.
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1104
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Auteur Walker, E.; Rivoirard, J.; Gaspar, P.; Bez, N.
Titre From forager tracks to prey distributions: an application to tuna vessel monitoring systems (VMS) Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Ecological Applications Revue Abrégée
Volume 25 Numéro 3 Pages 826-833
Mots-Clés Gps; multivariate geostatistics; presence index; spatiotemporal distribution; trajectometry; Tropical tuna; vessel monitoring system (VMS)
Résumé In the open ocean, movements of migratory fish populations are typically surveyed using tagging methods that are subject to low sample sizes for archive tags, except for a few notable examples, and poor temporal resolution for conventional tags. Alternatively, one can infer patterns of movement of migratory fish by tracking movements of their predators, i.e., fishing vessels, whose navigational systems (e.g., GPS) provide accurate and frequent VMS (vessel monitoring system) records of movement in pursuit of prey. In this paper, we develop a state-space model that infers the foraging activities of fishing vessels from their tracks. Second, we link foraging activities to probabilities of tuna presence. Finally, using multivariate geostatistical interpolation (cokriging) we map the probability of tuna presence together with their estimation variances and produce a time series of indices of abundance. While the segmentation of the trajectories is validated by observers' data, the present VMS-index is compared to catch rate and proved to be useful for management perspectives. The approach reported in this manuscript extends beyond the case study considered. It can be applied to any foragers that engage in an attempt of capture when they see prey and for whom this attempt is linked to a tractable change in behavior.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1116
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Auteur Díez, G.; Moreno, G.; Galaz, T.; Dagorn, L.; Murua, J.
Titre Digestive activity and stomach temperature in farmed bluefin tuna Thunnus thynnus measured by acoustic tag Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée J Fish Biol
Volume 90 Numéro 6 Pages 2504-2511
Mots-Clés acoustic; Bluefin tuna; digestion; farm; tag; Temperature
Résumé Eight farmed Atlantic bluefin tuna Thunnus thynnus were tagged with temperature and depth transmitters inserted in chub mackerels Scomber colias to characterize their digestive activity, feeding physiology and behaviour in captivity. Results obtained in the experiment can be used to optimize daily T. thynnus feeding strategy in farms, reducing the early regurgitation of food and thus the environmental effects of inappropriate feeding practices.
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Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1095-8649 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2145
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Auteur Rabearisoa, N.; Sabarros, P. S.; Romanov, E. V.; Lucas, V.; Bach, P.
Titre Toothed whale and shark depredation indicators: A case study from the Reunion Island and Seychelles pelagic longline fisheries Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée PLOS ONE
Volume 13 Numéro 8 Pages e0202037
Mots-Clés Indian Ocean; Seychelles; Sharks; Tuna; Fisheries; Economics; Killer whales; Whales
Résumé Depredation in marine ecosystems is defined as the damage or removal of fish or bait from fishing gear by predators. Depredation raises concerns about the conservation of species involved, fisheries yield and profitability, and reference points based on stock assessment of depredated species. Therefore, the development of accurate indicators to assess the impact of depredation is needed. Both the Reunion Island and the Seychelles archipelago pelagic longline fisheries targeting swordfish (Xiphias gladius) and tuna (Thunnus spp.) are affected by depredation from toothed whales and pelagic sharks. In this study, we used fishery data collected between 2004 and 2015 to propose depredation indicators and to assess depredation levels in both fisheries. For both fisheries, the interaction rate (depredation occurrence) was significantly higher for shark compared to toothed whale depredation. However, when depredation occurred, toothed whale depredation impact was significantly higher than shark depredation impact, with higher depredation per unit effort (number of fish depredated per 1000 hooks) and damage rate (proportion of fish depredated per depredated set). The gross depredation rate in the Seychelles was 18.3%. A slight increase of the gross depredation rate was observed for the Reunion Island longline fleet from 2011 (4.1% in 2007–2010 and 4.4% in 2011–2015). Economic losses due to depredation were estimated by using these indicators and published official statistics. A loss of 0.09 EUR/hook due to depredation was estimated for the Reunion Island longline fleet, and 0.86 EUR/hook for the Seychelles. These results suggest a southward decreasing toothed whale and shark depredation gradient in the southwest Indian Ocean. Seychelles depredation levels are among the highest observed in the world revealing this area as a “hotspot” of interaction between pelagic longline fisheries and toothed whales. This study also highlights the need for a set of depredation indicators to allow for a global comparison of depredation rates among various fishing grounds worldwide.
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ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2401
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