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Auteur Gaertner, D.; Hallier, J.-P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Tag shedding by tropical tunas in the Indian Ocean and other factors affecting the shedding rate Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Fisheries Research Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 163 Numéro Si Pages 98-105  
  Mots-Clés averaging; Bayesian model; Beta-binomial model; Indian Ocean; Shedding rate; Tagging data; Tropical tunas  
  Résumé (up) A key objective of the Regional Tuna Tagging Project Indian Ocean was to estimate tag-shedding rates, Type-I (immediate tag shedding) and Type-II (long-term tag shedding). To assess this, a series of double-tagging experiments (26,899 double tags released with 4555 recoveries) were conducted as part of the broader tagging program. After omitting data from tags placed by less experienced taggers, the results of our analyses did not show any evidence that individual differences between taggers (i.e., a tagger effect) impacted estimates of tag-shedding rates. However, it was shown that the probability of retaining the second tag (inserted in the left side of the fish) was larger than retaining the first tag (inserted in the right side, i.e., the side typically tagged in single-tagging experiments). We used a Bayesian model averaging approach to account for model uncertainty in the estimates of the parameters a and L used to calculate the probability of tag retention Q(t)= alpha e-((L t)) for the right tag. The parameter estimates were alpha = 0.993 and L (per year) = 0.030 (skipjack); alpha = 0.972 and L (per year) = 0.040 (yellowfin); and alpha = 0.990 and L (per year) = 0.021 (bigeye). These results agree with estimates obtained by other large-scale tropical tuna tagging projects. We showed that tag loss has a moderate impact on the underestimation of the exploitation rate (bias = 2-6% depending on the tuna species). However, non-reporting leads to a bias of around 7% when using the high reporting rate estimate of purse seiners. Finally, tag shedding (specifically Type-II shedding) modified the individual weights of the samples of recaptures. Consequently, the total instantaneous mortality estimates (Z; calculated from mean times-at-large) were reduced by a range of 1-3%.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur Murua, H.; Marsac, F.; Eveson, J.P.  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1104  
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Auteur Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Albouy, C.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecological traits shape genetic diversity patterns across the Mediterranean Sea: a quantitative review on fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 43 Numéro 4 Pages 845-857  
  Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; bass dicentrarchus-labrax; climate-change; cod gadus-morhua; ecological traits; effective population-size; genetic diversity; gilthead sea; life-history traits; marine fishes; marine populations; Mediterranean Sea; microsatellite markers; microsatellites; mitochondrial; mitochondrial DNA; molecular markers; population genetics  
  Résumé (up) AimWe set out to identify the determinants of the variation in genetic diversity among fish species and test whether multi-species genetic diversity is randomly distributed in space. LocationMediterranean Sea. MethodsWe collected genetic diversity data from 39 published studies on Mediterranean fishes (31 species) along with the spatial coordinates of the sampling sites. We focused on microsatellite heterozygosity (151 data points) and mitochondrial haplotype diversity (201 data points). We used linear regressions to link genetic diversity and 11 ecological traits. We also tested for spatial autocorrelation and trends in the residuals. ResultsAmong-species variation in microsatellite heterozygosity was explained by three ecological traits: vertical distribution, migration type and body length. Variation in mitochondrial haplotype diversity was also explained by vertical distribution and migration type, and by reproductive strategy (semelparity). However, vertical distribution and migration type showed opposite effects on microsatellites and mitochondrial diversity. After accounting for the effects of ecological traits, no spatial pattern was detected, except for one of the species considered. Main conclusionsEcological factors explain an important proportion of the among-species genetic diversity. These results suggest that life history strategies of the species influence the variation of microsatellite diversity indirectly through their effect on effective population size, while the spatial variations of genetic diversity seem to be too complex to be identified in our analysis. We found very different effects of traits on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA diversity, which can be explained by the specificities of mitochondrial DNA (absence of recombination, maternal inheritance and non-neutrality).  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1627  
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Auteur Nikolic, N.; Morandeau, G.; Hoarau, L.; West, W.; Arrizabalaga, H.; Hoyle, S.; Nicol, S.J.; Bourjea, J.; Puech, A.; Farley, J.H.; Williams, A.J.; Fonteneau, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Review of albacore tuna, Thunnus alalunga, biology, fisheries and management Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Rev Fish Biol Fisheries  
  Volume Numéro Pages 1-36  
  Mots-Clés Albacore; Tuna; Thunnus alalunga; Biology; Fishery  
  Résumé (up) Albacore is one of the most important commercially harvested species in the world’s oceans. Despite a long history of scientific research, there is no global review or synthesis of knowledge about the species across all oceanic regions. We analysed 613 published studies that report on albacore and summarize the current state of knowledge on biology, stock structure, fisheries and management. To describe the trends in albacore fisheries, we examined the catch and effort databases of Regional Fisheries Management Organisations. The stocks of albacore are generally largest in the Pacific Ocean and smallest in the Mediterranean Sea. The biology of Atlantic and Pacific Ocean stocks are well documented, while the Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea stocks are more data deficient. These two latter areas should be considered as priorities for future research and data collection in order to better understand the state of global stocks of albacore tuna. Improved information would also assist with delineating stock boundaries needed for sustainable management of this species.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0960-3166, 1573-5184 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1707  
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Auteur DRUON, J.-N.; FROMENTIN, J.-M.; AULANIER, F.; HEIKKONEN, J. url  openurl
  Titre Potential feeding and spawning habitats of Atlantic bluefin tuna in the Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2011 Publication Marine Ecology-progress Series Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 439 Numéro Pages 223-240  
  Mots-Clés Habitat mapping; Bluefin tuna; Thunnus thynnus; Feeding; Spawning; Mediterranean Sea; Remote sensing; Satellite data  
  Résumé (up) Atlantic bluefin tuna Thunnus thynnus (ABFT) is a fish of high market value which has recently become strongly overexploited, notably in the Mediterranean Sea. This area is an essential habitat for ABFT reproduction and growth. We present here an approach for deriving the daily mapping of potential ABFT feeding and spawning habitats based on satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) and chl a concentration. The feeding habitat was mainly derived from the simultaneous occurrence of oceanic fronts of temperature and chl a content while the spawning habitat was mostly inferred from the heating of surface waters. Generally, higher chl a contents were found to be preferred for the feeding habitat and a minimum SST value was found for the spawning habitat. Both habitats were defined by the presence of relevant oceanographic features and are therefore potential and functionally-linked habitats. This approach provides, for the first time, a synoptic view of the potential ABFT habitats in the Mediterranean Sea. The model performs well in areas where both satellite data and ABFT observations are available, as 80% of presence data are in the vicinity of potential habitats. The computed monthly, seasonal and annual maps of potential feeding and spawning habitat of ABFT from 2003 to 2009 are in good agreement with current knowledge on ABFT. Overall, the habitat size of ABFT is about 6% of the Mediterranean Sea surface. The results displayed a strong seasonality in habitat size and locations as well as high year-to-year variations (30 to 60%), particularly for the potential spawning habitat, which is key information for evaluating the utility of ABFT Marine Protected Areas in the Mediterranean Sea.  
  Adresse IFREMER, Ctr Rech Halieut Mediterraneen & Trop, F-34203 Sete, France.  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Inter-research Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ 16053 collection 1003  
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Auteur Dagorn, L.; Holland, K.N.; Filmalter, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Are drifting FADs essential for testing the ecological trap hypothesis ? Type Article scientifique
  Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Research  
  Volume 106 Numéro Pages 60-63  
  Mots-Clés ecological; Fad; hypothesis; trap; Tunas  
  Résumé (up) Because tropical tunas are known to aggregate around floating objects, it has been suggested that the large number of drifting fish aggregating devices (FADS) built and deployed by purse seiners could act as an 'ecological trap'. This hypothesis states that these networks of drifting FADS could take fish to areas where they would not normally go or retain them in places that they would otherwise leave. Because the ecological trap hypothesis was first advanced for drifting FADs, some have argued that only studies using drifting FADs can test this hypothesis. However, because working with drifting FADs is difficult, accepting this precept would preclude the scientific community from providing urgently needed information to organizations charged with management of fisheries that exploit drifting FADs. We argue that because both anchored and drifting FADs alter the natural environment, the more easily accessible anchored FADs can be used to test the ecological trap hypothesis. Also, based on a comparative scientific approach, we argue that understanding the behaviour of tunas around anchored FADs can improve our general understanding of tunas around all types of floating objects and help design new, well focused studies for drifting FADs. As anchored FADs are easier to access and offer a greater potential for research, we encourage scientists to design and conduct studies (in particular on the behaviour of fish at FADS) around the moored structures.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 66  
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