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Auteur Escalle, L.; Gaertner, D.; Chavance, P.; Delgado de Molina, A.; Ariz, J.; Mérigot, B. doi  openurl
  Titre Forecasted consequences of simulated FAD moratoria in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans on catches and bycatches Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 74 Numéro 3 Pages 780-792  
  Mots-Clés area; Bycatch; ecosystem approach to fisheries; fish aggregation device; management; Megafauna; Monte Carlo simulations; Purse-seine fishery; time; time-area restriction; tropical tuna purse-seine fishery; Tuna  
  Résumé (up) Given the increasingly extensive use of drifting fish aggregation devices (FADs) by the purse-seine fisheries targeting tropical tunas, fishing effort restrictions have been introduced to manage tropical tuna stocks. However, these measures are focused on the protection of juvenile tunas and do not take account of the potential impact on bycatch or associated megafauna (whales and whale sharks). An iterative “fishing-day” Monte Carlo simulation model was developed to investigate the consequences on tropical tunas and bycatch of introducing extensive area 6-month moratoria on FAD activities. The model allowed for variability in a range of plausible values of the parameters characterizing the fishing operations conducted by European purse-seiners in the eastern tropical Atlantic and western Indian Oceans for the period 2005-2014. Monte Carlo simulations, using probabilities based on these fishery data, were carried out for the French and Spanish fishing fleets separately to account for differences in fishing strategies. The models predicted a decrease in FAD sets and an increase in free school sets. As a consequence, the catch of small tuna (<10 kg) decreased while the catch of large tuna (>= 10 kg) increased, leading to an overall increase in tuna catch of 100-200 tons/year/vessel in the Atlantic Ocean, and a decrease of 400-1500 tons/year/vessel in the Indian Ocean. The bycatch decreased in the Indian Ocean, while in the Atlantic Ocean billfishes, turtles and chondrichthyans bycatch increased slightly and other bony fishes decreased. Because fishing practices were modified, whale and whale shark associated sets increased slightly in the Indian Ocean.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2105  
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Auteur Pecoraro, C.; Babbucci, M.; Villamor, A.; Franch, R.; Papetti, C.; Leroy, B.; Ortega-Garcia, S.; Muir, J.; Rooker, J.; Arocha, F.; Murua, H.; Zudaire, I.; Chassot, E.; Bodin, N.; Tinti, F.; Bargelloni, L.; Cariani, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Methodological assessment of 2b-RAD genotyping technique for population structure inferences in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Genomics  
  Volume 25 Numéro Pages 43-48  
  Mots-Clés Marine fish; Population genomics; RAD sequencing; Snp; Tropical tuna; Tuna fishery  
  Résumé (up) Global population genetic structure of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) is still poorly understood despite its relevance for the tuna fishery industry. Low levels of genetic differentiation among oceans speak in favour of the existence of a single panmictic population worldwide of this highly migratory fish. However, recent studies indicated genetic structuring at a much smaller geographic scales than previously considered, pointing out that YFT population genetic structure has not been properly assessed so far. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time, the utility of 2b-RAD genotyping technique for investigating population genetic diversity and differentiation in high gene-flow species. Running de novo pipeline in Stacks, a total of 6772 high-quality genome-wide SNPs were identified across Atlantic, Indian and Pacific population samples representing all major distribution areas. Preliminary analyses showed shallow but significant population structure among oceans (FST = 0.0273; P-value < 0.01). Discriminant Analysis of Principal Components endorsed the presence of genetically discrete yellowfin tuna populations among three oceanic pools. Although such evidence needs to be corroborated by increasing sample size, these results showed the efficiency of this genotyping technique in assessing genetic divergence in a marine fish with high dispersal potential.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1874-7787 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1539  
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Auteur Young, J.W.; Olson, R.J.; Ménard, F.; Kuhnert, P.M.; Duffy, L.M.; Allain, V.; Logan, J.M.; Lorrain, A.; Somes, C.J.; Graham, B.; Goñi, N.; Pethybridge, H.; Simier, M.; Potier, M.; Romanov, E.; Pagendam, D.; Hannides, C.; Choy, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Setting the stage for a global-scale trophic analysis of marine top predators: a multi-workshop review Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Rev Fish Biol Fisheries  
  Volume 25 Numéro 1 Pages 261-272  
  Mots-Clés climate change; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Global diet data; Global nitrogen model; Global stable isotope data; Predictive analyses; top predators; Tuna trophic ecology; Zoology  
  Résumé (up) Global-scale studies of marine food webs are rare, despite their necessity for examining and understanding ecosystem level effects of climate variability. Here we review the progress of an international collaboration that compiled regional diet datasets of multiple top predator fishes from the Indian, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans and developed new statistical methods that can be used to obtain a comprehensive ocean-scale understanding of food webs and climate impacts on marine top predators. We loosely define top predators not as species at the apex of the food web, but rather a guild of large predators near the top of the food web. Specifically, we present a framework for world-wide compilation and analysis of global stomach-contents and stable-isotope data of tunas and other large pelagic predatory fishes. To illustrate the utility of the statistical methods, we show an example using yellowfin tuna in a “test” area in the Pacific Ocean. Stomach-contents data were analyzed using a modified (bagged) classification tree approach, which is being prepared as an R statistical software package. Bulk δ15N values of yellowfin tuna muscle tissue were examined using a Generalized Additive Model, after adjusting for spatial differences in the δ15N values of the baseline primary producers predicted by a global coupled ocean circulation-biogeochemical-isotope model. Both techniques in tandem demonstrated the capacity of this approach to elucidate spatial patterns of variations in both forage species and predator trophic positions and have the potential to predict responses to climate change. We believe this methodology could be extended to all marine top predators. Our results emphasize the necessity for quantitative investigations of global-scale datasets when evaluating changes to the food webs underpinning top ocean predators under long-term climatic variability.  
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  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0960-3166, 1573-5184 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1263  
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Auteur Escalle, L.; Gaertner, D.; Chavance, P.; Murua, H.; Simier, M.; Jose Pascual-Alayon, P.; Menard, F.; Ruiz, J.; Abascal, F.; Mérigot, B. doi  openurl
  Titre Catch and bycatch captured by tropical tuna purse-seine fishery in whale and whale shark associated sets: comparison with free school and FAD sets Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Biodivers. Conserv.  
  Volume 28 Numéro 2 Pages 467-499  
  Mots-Clés diversity; mortality; atlantic; biology; Bycatch; strategies; Megafauna; behavior; dominance; yellowfin; Catch composition; Diversity; Ecosystem approach to fisheries management; swimming speeds; Tuna purse-seine fishery  
  Résumé (up) In an ecosystem approach to fisheries management (EAFM) framework of the tuna purse-seine fishery, the assessment of target species, but also that of bycatch species, is essential. In the Atlantic and Indian oceans, purse-seine nets are sometimes set around tuna schools associated with whale sharks and baleen whales, although less frequently than around free-swimming tuna schools or those associated with fish aggregating devices (FAD). However, knowledge on the targeted catch and bycatch in these megafauna associated fishing sets is still relatively limited. Therefore, the aims of this study were to assess species and size composition of the target tuna species, as well as the diversity of bycatch species in whale and whale shark associated sets. Whale associated sets were found to be very similar to free school sets in terms of tuna catch (large yellowfin tuna), bycatch occurrence (presence in half the sets) and species assemblage (alpha and beta diversity). Whale shark associated sets were intermediate between FAD and free school sets, with tuna catch (skipjack and juvenile yellowfin) closer to FAD than to free school sets. However, the presence of large yellowfin, the bycatch composition (with almost no finfish, abundantly captured in FAD sets) and the species assemblage showed similarity with free school sets. This study highlights the need for an EAFM in the tuna purse-seine fishery by providing knowledge on pelagic multi-specific catches and bycatches.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0960-3115 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2482  
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Auteur Arrizabalaga, H.; Dufour, F.; Kell, L.; Merino, G.; Ibaibarriaga, L.; Chust, G.; Irigoien, X.; Santiago, J.; Murua, H.; Fraile, I.; Chifflet, M.; Goikoetxea, N.; Sagarminaga, Y.; Aumont, O.; Bopp, L.; Herrera, M.; FROMENTIN, J.-M.; Bonhomeau, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Global habitat preferences of commercially valuable tuna Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 113 Numéro Pages 102-112  
  Mots-Clés Habitat; Tuna fisheries; Catch/ effort; Environmental conditions; Quotient analysis; Generalized Additive Models; Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management  
  Résumé (up) In spite of its pivotal role in future implementations of the Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management, current knowledge about tuna habitat preferences remains fragmented and heterogeneous, because it relies mainly on regional or local studies that have used a variety of approaches making them difficult to combine. Therefore in this study we analyse data from six tuna species in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans in order to provide a global, comparative perspective of habitat preferences. These data are longline catch per unit effort from 1958 to2007 for albacore, Atlantic bluefin, southern bluefin, bigeye, yellowfin and skipjack tunas. Both quotient analysis and Generalized Additive Models were used to determine habitat preference with respect to eight biotic and abiotic variables. Results confirmed that, compared to temperate tunas, tropical tunas prefer warm, anoxic, stratified waters. Atlantic and southern bluefin tuna prefer higher concentrations of chlorophyll than the rest. The two species also tolerate most extreme sea surface height anomalies and highest mixed layer depths. In general, Atlantic bluefin tuna tolerates the widest range of environmental conditions. An assessment of the most important variables determining fish habitat is also provided.  
  Adresse Ifremer, UMR 212 EME, boulevard Jean Monnet, BP 171, Sete Cedex, 34203, France  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Elsevier BV Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ 31190 collection 981  
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