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Auteur Lucena Frédou, F.; Frédou, T.; Gaertner, D.; Kell, L.; Potier, M.; Bach, P.; Travassos, P.; Hazin, F.; Ménard, F. url  doi
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  Titre Life history traits and fishery patterns of teleosts caught by the tuna longline fishery in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Research  
  Volume 179 Numéro Pages 308-321  
  Mots-Clés Bycatch; Fishing impact; Tuna; Billfish; Ecosystem based fisheries management  
  Résumé (up) The identification and mitigation of adverse effects of the bycatch of tuna longline fishery have been mainly developed and implemented for seabirds, sharks and turtles and, the knowledge on teleost bycatch for this fishery, remains very poor. This paper contributes to a comprehensive assessment of life history traits and fishery attributes of target and bycatch species caught by the tuna longline fishery in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Data was compiled on seven life history traits and three fishery attributes for 33 and 27 teleost stocks caught by longliners in South Atlantic and Indian Oceans, respectively. In addition, each species was assigned into four categories describing the fate of the catch: target species for commercial use, bycatch species kept for consumption, bycatch species kept for commercial use and discarded bycatch. Life history traits and fishery attributes did not differ between oceans. However, non-target but commercialized species were smaller in the Atlantic Ocean. Teleosts caught by the tuna longline fishery was segregated into three main groups: (1) the fast growing species represented mainly by dolphinfishes (Coryphaena hippurus and C. equisellis), skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis), kawakawa (Euthynnus affinis), bullet tuna (Auxis rochei), snoek (Thyrsites atun) and blackfin tuna (Thunnus atlanticus); (2) target tunas and most other bycatch species which were part of an intermediate group and (3) billfishes including swordfish representing the large and slow growing species with moderate to high market values and unknown or highly uncertain stock status. Investment in some key life history traits (such as growth coefficient) and the development of quantitative or semi-quantitative approaches (stock assessment and Ecological Risk Assessment) should be priorized as precautionary management measures for these species.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2405  
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Auteur Grande, M.; Murua, H.; Zudaire, I.; Arsenault-Pernet, E.J.; Pernet, F.; Bodin, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Energy allocation strategy of skipjack tuna Katsuwonus pelamis during their reproductive cycle Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Fish Biol.  
  Volume 89 Numéro 5 Pages 2434-2448  
  Mots-Clés bonito euthynnus-pelamis; cod gadus-morhua; fatty-acid-composition; highly migratory fish; Income breeder; Indian Ocean; lipid classes; oocyte growth; reproduction; sarda-sarda; teleost fish; thunnus-albacares; Tropical tuna; western indian-ocean  
  Résumé (up) The lipid composition of somatic and reproductive tissues was determined for female skipjack tuna Katsuwonus pelamis caught in the western Indian Ocean between latitude 10 degrees N and 20 degrees S and longitude 40 degrees and 70 degrees E. The highest total lipid (TL) contents were in the liver and gonads, with white muscle levels approximately three-fold lower. Three lipid classes dominated: triacylglycerols (TAG), sterol esters and wax esters (SE-WE) and phospholipids (PL). Collectively, these accounted for between 70 and 80% of TLs. Changes in lipid concentrations were evaluated over the maturation cycle. Immature fish had the lowest gonad and liver TL levels; concentrations of TL, TAG, SE-WE and PL accumulated from immature to mature (spawning-capable) phase, reflecting sustained vitellogenic activity of the liver and a transfer of lipids to developing oocytes from the onset of vitellogenesis. Gonado-somatic and hepato-somatic indices were positively correlated with each other and positively related to TL in the gonads and liver. Fulton's condition index and lipid concentrations in muscle did not vary significantly over the maturation cycle; fat content in the main storage tissues was undepleted as the ovary developed. Hence, K. pelamis apparently supports reproduction directly from food intake over the breeding season. In the gonads, reserve lipids (SE-WE and TAG) and sterols were related to batch fecundity but this was not the case for somatic and hepatic tissues. These results suggest that K. pelamis utilizes an income breeding strategy.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1685  
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Auteur Keller, S.; Quetglas, A.; Puerta, P.; Bitetto, I.; Casciaro, L.; Cuccu, D.; Esteban, A.; Garcia, C.; Garofalo, G.; Guijarro, B.; Josephides, M.; Jadaud, A.; Lefkaditou, E.; Maiorano, P.; Manfredi, C.; Marceta, B.; Micallef, R.; Peristeraki, P.; Relini, G.; Sartor, P.; Spedicato, M.T.; Tserpes, G.; Hidalgo, M. doi  openurl
  Titre Environmentally driven synchronies of Mediterranean cephalopod populations Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Prog. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 152 Numéro Pages 1-14  
  Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; balearic sea; Cephalopods; Dynamic factor analysis; ecological niche approach; fisheries; fluctuations; hake merluccius-merluccius; Illex coindetii; life-history; Mediterranean; medits; octopus; Octopus vulgaris; squid; Synchrony; time-series  
  Résumé (up) The Mediterranean Sea is characterized by large scale gradients of temperature, productivity and salinity, in addition to pronounced mesoscale differences. Such a heterogeneous system is expected to shape the population dynamics of marine species. On the other hand, prevailing environmental and climatic conditions at whole basin scale may force spatially distant populations to fluctuate in synchrony. Cephalopods are excellent case studies to test these hypotheses owing to their high sensitivity to environmental conditions. Data of two cephalopod species with contrasting life histories (benthic octopus vs nectobenthic squid), obtained from scientific surveys carried out throughout the Mediterranean during the last 20 years were analyzed. The objectives of this study and the methods used to achieve them (in parentheses) were: (i) to investigate synchronies in spatially separated populations (decorrelation analysis); (ii) detect underlying common abundance trends over distant regions (dynamic factor analysis, DFA); and (iii) analyse putative influences of key environmental drivers such as productivity and sea surface temperature on the population dynamics at regional scale (general linear models, GLM). In accordance with their contrasting spatial mobility, the distance from where synchrony could no longer be detected (decorrelation scale) was higher in squid than in octopus (349 vs 217 km); for comparison, the maximum distance between locations was 2620 km. The DFA revealed a general increasing trend in the abundance of both species in most areas, which agrees with the already reported worldwide proliferation of cephalopods. DFA results also showed that population dynamics are more similar in the eastern than in the western Mediterranean basin. According to the GLM models, cephalopod populations were negatively affected by productivity, which would be explained by an increase of competition and predation by fishes. While warmer years coincided with declining octopus numbers, areas of high sea surface temperature showed higher densities of squid. Our results are relevant for regional fisheries management and demonstrate that the regionalisation objectives envisaged under the new Common Fishery Policy may not be adequate for Mediterranean cephalopod stocks. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2132  
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Auteur Bodin, N.; Lesperance, D.; Albert, R.; Hollanda, S.; Michaud, P.; Degroote, M.; Churlaud, C.; Bustamante, P. doi  openurl
  Titre Trace elements in oceanic pelagic communities in the western Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Chemosphere  
  Volume 174 Numéro Pages 354-362  
  Mots-Clés atlantic-ocean; blue marlin; Environmental risk assessment; makaira-nigricans; Marine fish; Mediterranean Sea; Mercury; mercury content; North Pacific; risk-assessment; Seafood; Selenium; swordfish xiphias-gladius; Tuna fisheries' bycatch  
  Résumé (up) The mineral composition of target and non-target pelagic fish caught by purse-seiners and longliners in the western-central Indian Ocean was determined. From the 10 essential elements analysed, selenium and zinc showed the highest concentrations in swordfish and blue marlin while Indian mackerel appeared as a good source of copper, iron and chrome. All catch had levels of lead and cadmium, two toxic elements, below the maximum sanitary limits. Although some concerns were raised regarding mercury concentrations in the largest species (wahoo, swordfish and blue marlin), molar ratios of mercury and selenium indicate that all oceanic pelagic fish from the western-central Indian Ocean are safe for human consumption. This study also gives insights on the relationships between the levels of essential and toxic elements in fish muscle and the size, trophic position and diet sources of the studied pelagic species. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0045-6535 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2119  
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Auteur Jaquemet, S.; Ternon, J.-F.; Kaehler, S.; Thiebot, J.B.; Dyer, B.; Bemanaja, E.; Marteau, C.; Le Corre, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Contrasted structuring effects of mesoscale features on the seabird community in the Mozambique Channel Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Research Part II.Topical Studies in Oceanography  
  Volume 100 Numéro No spécial Pages 200-211  
  Mots-Clés Foraging habitats; Frigatebird; Marine productivity; Mesoscale eddies; Red-footed booby; Sooty tern; Tropical marine predators; Tuna; Western Indian Ocean  
  Résumé (up) The Mozambique Channel (western Indian Ocean) is a dynamic environment characterised by strong mesoscale features, which influence all biological components of the pelagic ecosystem. We investigated the distribution, abundance and feeding behaviour of seabirds in the Mozambique Channel in relation to physical and biological environmental variables, with a specific interest in mesoscale features. Seabird censuses were conducted in summer and winter during 7 cruises in the southern and northern Mozambique Channel. Tropical species accounted for 49% of the 37 species identified and 97% of the individuals, and species from the sub-Antarctic region constituted 30% of the identifications. The typically tropical sooty tern (Onychoprion fuscata) was the dominant species during all cruises, and overall accounted for 74% of the species observations and 85% of counted birds. Outputs of Generalised Linear Models at the scale of the Mozambique Channel suggested that higher densities of flying and feeding birds occurred in areas with lower sea surface temperatures and lower surface chlorophyll a concentrations. Most of the flocks of feeding birds did not associate with surface schools of fish or marine mammals, but when they did, these flocks were larger, especially when associated with tuna. While tropical species seemed to favour cyclonic eddies, frontal and divergence zones, non-tropical species were more frequently recorded over shelf waters. Sooty terns foraged preferentially in cyclonic eddies where zooplankton, micronelcton and tuna schools were abundant. Among other major tropical species, frigatebirds (Fregata spp.) predominated in frontal zones between eddies, where tuna schools also frequently occurred and where geostrophic currents were the strongest. Red-footed boobies (Sula sub) concentrated in divergence zones characterised by low sea level anomalies, low geostrophic currents, and high zooplanlcton biomass close to the surface. Our results highlight the importance of mescoscale features in structuring the tropical seabird community in the Mozambique Channel, in addition to segregating tropical and non-tropical species. The mechanisms underlying the segregation of tropical seabirds seem to partially differ from that of other tropical regions, and this may be a consequence of the strong local mesoscale activity, affecting prey size and availability schemes. Beyond characterising the foraging habitats of the seabird community of the Mozambique Channel, this study highlights the importance of this region as a hot spot for seabirds; especially the southern part, where several endangered sub-Antarctic species over-winter.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur Barlow, R.; Marsac, F.; Ternon, J.-F.; Roberts, M.  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 363  
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