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Auteur Dagorn, L.; Holland, K.N.; Filmalter, J.
Titre Are drifting FADs essential for testing the ecological trap hypothesis ? Type Article scientifique
Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Fisheries Research
Volume 106 Numéro Pages 60-63
Mots-Clés ecological; Fad; hypothesis; trap; Tunas
Résumé Because tropical tunas are known to aggregate around floating objects, it has been suggested that the large number of drifting fish aggregating devices (FADS) built and deployed by purse seiners could act as an 'ecological trap'. This hypothesis states that these networks of drifting FADS could take fish to areas where they would not normally go or retain them in places that they would otherwise leave. Because the ecological trap hypothesis was first advanced for drifting FADs, some have argued that only studies using drifting FADs can test this hypothesis. However, because working with drifting FADs is difficult, accepting this precept would preclude the scientific community from providing urgently needed information to organizations charged with management of fisheries that exploit drifting FADs. We argue that because both anchored and drifting FADs alter the natural environment, the more easily accessible anchored FADs can be used to test the ecological trap hypothesis. Also, based on a comparative scientific approach, we argue that understanding the behaviour of tunas around anchored FADs can improve our general understanding of tunas around all types of floating objects and help design new, well focused studies for drifting FADs. As anchored FADs are easier to access and offer a greater potential for research, we encourage scientists to design and conduct studies (in particular on the behaviour of fish at FADS) around the moored structures.
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ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 66
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Auteur Lucena Frédou, F.; Frédou, T.; Gaertner, D.; Kell, L.; Potier, M.; Bach, P.; Travassos, P.; Hazin, F.; Ménard, F.
Titre Life history traits and fishery patterns of teleosts caught by the tuna longline fishery in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Fisheries Research
Volume 179 Numéro Pages 308-321
Mots-Clés Bycatch; Fishing impact; Tuna; Billfish; Ecosystem based fisheries management
Résumé The identification and mitigation of adverse effects of the bycatch of tuna longline fishery have been mainly developed and implemented for seabirds, sharks and turtles and, the knowledge on teleost bycatch for this fishery, remains very poor. This paper contributes to a comprehensive assessment of life history traits and fishery attributes of target and bycatch species caught by the tuna longline fishery in the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Data was compiled on seven life history traits and three fishery attributes for 33 and 27 teleost stocks caught by longliners in South Atlantic and Indian Oceans, respectively. In addition, each species was assigned into four categories describing the fate of the catch: target species for commercial use, bycatch species kept for consumption, bycatch species kept for commercial use and discarded bycatch. Life history traits and fishery attributes did not differ between oceans. However, non-target but commercialized species were smaller in the Atlantic Ocean. Teleosts caught by the tuna longline fishery was segregated into three main groups: (1) the fast growing species represented mainly by dolphinfishes (Coryphaena hippurus and C. equisellis), skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis), kawakawa (Euthynnus affinis), bullet tuna (Auxis rochei), snoek (Thyrsites atun) and blackfin tuna (Thunnus atlanticus); (2) target tunas and most other bycatch species which were part of an intermediate group and (3) billfishes including swordfish representing the large and slow growing species with moderate to high market values and unknown or highly uncertain stock status. Investment in some key life history traits (such as growth coefficient) and the development of quantitative or semi-quantitative approaches (stock assessment and Ecological Risk Assessment) should be priorized as precautionary management measures for these species.
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Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2405
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Auteur Guillotreau, P.; Salladarre, F.; Dewals, P.; Dagorn, L.
Titre Fishing tuna around Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) vs free swimming schools : skipper decision and other determining factors Type Article scientifique
Année 2011 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Fisheries Research
Volume 109 Numéro 2-3 Pages 234-242
Mots-Clés Fish Aggregating Devices; Purse-seine; Skipper effect; tuna
Résumé Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) are increasingly used by tuna purse-seine fleets all around the world, modifying the species catch composition. We analyse the determinants of FAD vs free school (FS) fishing, including the skipper effect, and environmental and economic factors. A multivariate and econometric analysis of a panel dataset for the French purse-seine fleet in the Indian Ocean (1980-2007), complemented by a survey of fishers, demonstrates the influential role of climate and prey on FAD fishing and also emphasises individual skipper preference. However, we found that the major determinant of FAD fishing remains the growing fishing capacity (use of bigger vessels, satellite buoys, echo-sounders, supply vessels), thus modifying the species catch composition towards smaller tuna. Other things being equal, raising the proportion of FAD sets by 1% would increase the catches of skipjack by 1.3% and decrease those of large yellowfin tuna by 1.7%. This result shows that the control of effort and investment could be adapted through management measures to encourage one fishing method.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 143
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Auteur Rouyer, T.; Bonhommeau, S.; Giordano, N.; Ellul, S.; Ellul, G.; Deguara, S.; Wendling, B.; Belhaj, M.M.; Kerzerho, V.; Bernard, S.
Titre Tagging Atlantic bluefin tuna from a farming cage: An attempt to reduce handling times for large scale deployments Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Fisheries Research
Volume 211 Numéro Pages 27-31
Mots-Clés Electronic tagging; Farming cage; Large Atlantic bluefin tuna; Release
Résumé Our knowledge on the biology and ecology of marine species have improved greatly through the use of archival tags by enabling the collection on information from individual in the wild. This is specifically true for large pelagic species such as the Atlantic Bluefin tuna (ABFT, Thunnus thynnus) where, for the first time, it has been possible to confirm through fisheries-independent data, migration patterns, reproductive and feeding behaviours and habitat use. However, large-scale tagging experiments that would enable researchers to tackle group behaviour are difficult to set up. On the one hand, the impact of the actual tagging operation should be as minimal as possible to avoid any change in behaviour of the fish which could influence tag data analyses. On the other hand, large scale tagging experiments require handling a large number of animals in a relatively short period of time. In the present manuscript, a methodology for tagging several large ABFT with satellite tags was tested with ABFT caught from a cage of a Maltese farm. The total time of the operation, from the moment fish were caught by handline to release back to the sea lasted an average of 10 min for the 3 fish tagged. The handling of the fish on the deck lasted less than 2 min. This methodology proved successful at tagging several large (158–182 cm) fishes in a very short time, while ensuring the best conditions for the fish during tagging and subsequent release. This procedure requires substantial logistical preparation and an experienced crew team but, by reducing the time required for the operation, opens up the possibility of large scale tagging activities of large fish held in cages or caught by purse seiners.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2487
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Auteur Zudaire, I.; Murua, H.; Grande, M.; Pernet, F.; Bodin, N.
Titre Accumulation and mobilization of lipids in relation to reproduction of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) in the Western Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Fisheries Research
Volume Numéro Pages 50-59
Mots-Clés FADs; Fecundity; Income-capital breeder; Lipid class composition; Reproductive allocation strategy; Tropical tuna
Résumé Total lipid content and lipid class composition were analyzed in gonads, liver and white muscle of yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) throughout ovary development to understand its reproductive allocation strategy and to assess the relation between female condition and reproduction. A total of 112 females were collected onboard purse-seiner in the Western Indian Ocean from January to March 2009, from June to July 2009, and from April to May 2010. Gonads were characterized by highly variable total lipid contents ranging from 5 to 27 μg mg−1 of wet weight (ww) with a predominance of neutral lipids, mainly triacylglycerols (TAG) and sterol- and wax-esters. The different lipid classes in gonads described an accumulative pattern through the maturity process from immature to hydration phase. Total lipid content in liver varied from 10 to 21 μg mg−1 ww, and serves as fuel for yellowfin tuna reproduction. TAG and phospholipid deposits became depleted as the ovary developed, suggesting a transfer of lipids directly from liver to the oocytes during vitellogenesis. In contrast, muscle total lipid content was low and constant throughout ovarian development (2.5–6 μg mg−1 ww). Hence, yellowfin tuna can be defined as an income-capital breeder species for which the cost of reproduction depends mainly on concurrent energy income from feeding and only little on stored lipids. Besides, no significant relationship between gonad lipid composition and fecundity was found in females able to spawn. Finally, the influence of yellowfin tuna aggregation behaviour on reproductive female condition has been investigated: gonad total lipid contents were higher in females caught in free-swimming schools than in females caught under fish aggregating devices (FADs). However, these results did not clarify whether the influence of FADs on associated yellowfin tuna affects their reproductive capacity.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Advances in Fisheries Research in Ibero-America Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection 160 Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1209
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