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Auteur (up) Amélineau, F.; Grémillet, D.; Bonnet, D.; Bot, T.L.; Fort, J.
Titre Where to Forage in the Absence of Sea Ice? Bathymetry As a Key Factor for an Arctic Seabird Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Plos One
Volume 11 Numéro 7 Pages e0157764
Mots-Clés Birds; Copepods; Foraging; Predation; Seabirds; Sea ice; Trophic interactions; Zooplankton
Résumé The earth is warming at an alarming rate, especially in the Arctic, where a marked decline in sea ice cover may have far-ranging consequences for endemic species. Little auks, endemic Arctic seabirds, are key bioindicators as they forage in the marginal ice zone and feed preferentially on lipid-rich Arctic copepods and ice-associated amphipods sensitive to the consequences of global warming. We tested how little auks cope with an ice-free foraging environment during the breeding season. To this end, we took advantage of natural variation in sea ice concentration along the east coast of Greenland. We compared foraging and diving behaviour, chick diet and growth and adult body condition between two years, in the presence versus nearby absence of sea ice in the vicinity of their breeding site. Moreover, we sampled zooplankton at sea when sea ice was absent to evaluate prey location and little auk dietary preferences. Little auks foraged in the same areas both years, irrespective of sea ice presence/concentration, and targeted the shelf break and the continental shelf. We confirmed that breeding little auks showed a clear preference for larger copepod species to feed their chick, but caught smaller copepods and nearly no ice-associated amphipod when sea ice was absent. Nevertheless, these dietary changes had no impact on chick growth and adult body condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of bathymetry for profitable little auk foraging, whatever the sea-ice conditions. Our investigations, along with recent studies, also confirm more flexibility than previously predicted for this key species in a warming Arctic.
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ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1592
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Auteur (up) Galiana, N.; Lurgi, M.; Claramunt-Lopez, B.; Fortin, M.-J.; Leroux, S.; Cazelles, K.; Gravel, D.; Montoya, J.M.
Titre The spatial scaling of species interaction networks Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Ecol. Evol.
Volume 2 Numéro 5 Pages 782-790
Mots-Clés area relationships; biodiversity; competition; diversity; ecological networks; extinction; food-web structure; habitat loss; source-sink metacommunities; trophic interactions
Résumé Species-area relationships (SARs) are pivotal to understand the distribution of biodiversity across spatial scales. We know little, however, about how the network of biotic interactions in which biodiversity is embedded changes with spatial extent. Here we develop a new theoretical framework that enables us to explore how different assembly mechanisms and theoretical models affect multiple properties of ecological networks across space. We present a number of testable predictions on network-area relationships (NARs) for multi-trophic communities. Network structure changes as area increases because of the existence of different SARs across trophic levels, the preferential selection of generalist species at small spatial extents and the effect of dispersal limitation promoting beta-diversity. Developing an understanding of NARs will complement the growing body of knowledge on SARs with potential applications in conservation ecology. Specifically, combined with further empirical evidence, NARs can generate predictions of potential effects on ecological communities of habitat loss and fragmentation in a changing world.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2397-334x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2339
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Auteur (up) Sirot, C.; Gronkjaer, P.; Pedersen, J.B.; Panfili, J.; Zetina-Rejon, M.; Tripp-Valdez, A.; Ramos-Miranda, J.; Flores-Hernandez, D.; Sosa-Lopez, A.; Darnaude, A.M.
Titre Using otolith organic matter to detect diet shifts in Bardiella chrysoura, during a period of environmental changes Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.
Volume 575 Numéro Pages 137-152
Mots-Clés aquatic ecosystems; Bairdiella chrysoura; climate-change; Coastal ecosystem; fish otoliths; food-web; movement patterns; prey availability; Stable isotope analysis; stable-isotope analysis; survival; temporal-changes; terminos lagoon; Trophic ecology; Trophic interactions
Résumé Accurate knowledge on fish trophic ecology and its modifications is crucial for understanding the impact of global change on ecosystems. In this context, we investigated the value of the delta C-13 and delta N-15 of otolith soluble organic matter (SOM) for identifying temporal diet shifts in American silver perch Bairdiella chrysoura over a 30-yr period characterized by strong changes in its population size and habitats within the Terminos Lagoon (Mexico). We first compared the otolith SOM isotopic signatures from present-clay adults to those of muscle and the main local prey. Our results suggest that otolith SOM can be confidently extracted and analyzed for both present and past otoliths of this species. The mean otolith SOM signatures obtained (-15.92 +/- 1.35%, for delta C-13 and 9.38 +/- 0.93%, for delta N-15) were consistent with those of the diet as 85% of the individual signatures were included within the prey isotopic niche area. Moreover, this study supports a trophic enrichment factor between diet and otolith (TEFdiet-otolith) close to 0 for delta N-15, while for delta C-13, the TEFololith-muscle of +0.02% warrants further investigation. Then, we compared past and contemporary otolith SOM signatures to investigate temporal diet shifts in B. chrysoura. This showed that 613C and delta N-15 differed significantly between the past and present period even if the temporal shift remained relatively small (respectively +1.17%, and 0.55%). The present study substantiates the use of otolith SOM delta C-13 and delta N-15 as a proxy of fish present and past trophic position, opening the possibility for major progress in studies of temporal changes in food web ecology.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2172
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