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Auteur Crochelet, E.; Barrier, N.; Andrello, M.; Marsac, F.; Spadone, A.; Lett, C.
Titre Connectivity between seamounts and coastal ecosystems in the Southwestern Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume 176 Numéro Pages 104774
Mots-Clés behavior; Biophysical model; Connectivity; conservation; coral-reef fishes; Ichthyop; Lagrangian modelling; larvae dispersal; Larval drift; Larval duration; local retention; madagascar; marine populations; model; population connectivity; recruitment; Seamounts; Southwestern indian ocean; Surface drifters
Résumé Understanding larval connectivity patterns is critical for marine spatial planning, particularly for designing marine protected areas and managing fisheries. Patterns of larval dispersal and connectivity can be inferred from numerical transport models at large spatial and temporal scales. We assess model-based connectivity patterns between seamounts of the Southwestern Indian Ocean (SWIO) and the coastal ecosystems of Mauritius, La Reunion, Madagascar, Mozambique and South Africa, with emphasis on three shallow seamounts (La Pemuse [LP], MAD-Ridge [MR] and Walters Shoal [WS]). Using drifter trajectory and a Lagrangian model of ichthyo-plankton dispersal, we show that larvae can undertake very long dispersion, with larval distances increasing with pelagic larval duration (PLD). There are three groups of greater connectivity: the region between the eastern coast of Madagascar, Mauritius and La Reunion islands; the seamounts of the South West Indian Ridge; and the pair formed by WS and a nearby un-named seamount. Connectivity between these three groups is evident only for the longest PLD examined (360 d). Connectivity from seamounts to coastal ecosystems is weak, with a maximum of 2% of larvae originating from seamounts reaching coastal ecosystems. Local retention at the three focal seamounts (LP, MR and WS) peaks at about 11% for the shortest PLD considered (15 d) at the most retentive seamount (WS) and decreases sharply with increasing PLD. Information on PLD and age of larvae collected at MR and LP are used to assess their putative origin. These larvae are likely self-recruits but it is also plausible that they immigrate from nearby coastal sites, i.e. the southern coast of Madagascar for MR and the islands of La Reunion and Mauritius for LP.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000556810400003 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2840
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Auteur Hancke, L.; Roberts, M.J.; Ternon, J.-F.
Titre Surface drifter trajectories highlight flow pathways in the Mozambique Channel Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Research Part II.Topical Studies in Oceanography
Volume 100 Numéro No spécial Pages 27-37
Mots-Clés Frontal flow; Mesoscale eddies; Mozambique Channel; Surface circulation; Surface drifters
Résumé The pattern of surface circulation in the Mozambique Channel was elucidated from the trajectories of 82 satellite-tracked drifters over the period 2000-2010 and complementary satellite-derived altimetry. Overall, the trajectories indicated that anticyclonic activity was mostly observed on the western side of the Channel, with cyclonic activity being more prevalent in the east. A lack of eddy activity was noted in the southeast corner of the Channel (i.e. SW of Madagascar). Drifter behaviour illustrated that surface water from the Comoros Basin, entrained into anticyclonic eddies during formation, can be retained and isolated for months whilst being transported southwards through the Channel. During a tropical cyclone weather event, a drifter was observed to switch between counter-rotating eddies indicating that horizontal mixing of the Ekman layer does occur. The drifters also illustrated and emphasised the flow field and transport between eddies (i.e. the interstitial flow) in the Mozambique Channel. Despite the dominance of southward propagating anticyclones, drifters were able to move north and south through the Channel in the frontal flow field between eddies within periods of 51-207 days. Cross-channel transport in both directions between the Madagascan and Mozambique shelf regions was similarly observed, with time spans of 19-30 days. Surprisingly, drifters from the southern limb of the East Madagascar Current were transported westward across the channel to the Mozambique shelf. This transport was similarly facilitated by the frontal flow field between eddies. It is hypothesised that the frontal zones between eddies and interstitial waters play an important role in distributing biota in the Mozambique Channel.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur Barlow, R.; Marsac, F.; Ternon, J.-F.; Roberts, M.
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 361
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