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Auteur (up) Massol, F.; Dubart, M.; Calcagno, V.; Cazelles, K.; Jacquet, C.; Kefi, S.; Gravel, D. isbn  openurl
  Titre Island Biogeography of Food Webs Type Chapitre de livre
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée  
  Volume Numéro Pages 183-262  
  Mots-Clés animal abundance; body-size; complex networks; coral-reef fishes; coupled chemical-reactions; ecological communities; experimental zoogeography; habitat loss; power-laws; species-area relationship  
  Résumé To understand why and how species invade ecosystems, ecologists have made heavy use of observations of species colonization on islands. The theory of island biogeography, developed in the 1960s by R.H. MacArthur and E.O. Wilson, has had a tremendous impact on how ecologists understand the link between species diversity and characteristics of the habitat such as isolation and size. Recent developments have described how the inclusion of information on trophic interactions can further inform our understanding of island biogeography dynamics. Here, we extend the trophic theory of island biogeography to assess whether certain food web properties on the mainland affect colonization/extinction dynamics of species on islands. Our results highlight that both food web connectance and size on the mainland increase species diversity on islands. We also highlight that more heavily tailed degree distributions in the mainland food web correlate with less frequent but potentially more important extinction cascades on islands. The average shortest path to a basal species on islands follows a hump-shaped curve as a function of realized species richness, with food chains slightly longer than on the mainland at intermediate species richness. More modular mainland webs are also less persistent on islands. We discuss our results in the context of global changes and from the viewpoint of community assembly rules, aiming at pinpointing further theoretical developments needed to make the trophic theory of island biogeography even more useful for fundamental and applied ecology.  
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  Editeur Elsevier Academic Press Inc Lieu de Publication San Diego Éditeur Bohan, D.A.; Dumbrell, A.J.; Massol, F.  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Networks of Invasion: A Synthesis of Concepts  
  Volume de collection 56 Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-0-12-804331-8 978-0-12-804338-7 Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2174  
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Auteur (up) Matich, P.; Kiszka, J.J.; Heithaus, M.R.; Le Bourg, B.; Mourier, J. doi  openurl
  Titre Inter-individual differences in ontogenetic trophic shifts among three marine predators Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Oecologia  
  Volume 189 Numéro 3 Pages 621-636  
  Mots-Clés body-size; bull shark; carcharhinus-leucas; delta-n-15 values; Dietary shifts; Elasmobranchs; Foraging development; individual variation; intertissue comparisons; Juveniles; life-history traits; niche shifts; Nursery; specialization; stable-isotopes  
  Résumé Ontogenetic niche shifts are widespread. However, individual differences in size at birth, morphology, sex, and personalities can cause variability in behavior. As such, inherent inter-individual differences within populations may lead to context-dependent changes in behavior with animal body size, which is of concern for understanding population dynamics and optimizing ecological monitoring. Using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values from concurrently sampled tissues, we quantified the direction and magnitude of intraspecific variation in trophic shifts among three shark species, and how these changed with body size: spurdogs (Squalus spp.) in deep-sea habitats off La Reunion, bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) in estuarine habitats of the Florida Everglades, and blacktip reef sharks (Carcharhinus melanopterus) in coral reef ecosystems of Moorea, French Polynesia. Intraspecific variation in trophic shifts was limited among spurdogs, and decreased with body size, while bull sharks exhibited greater individual differences in trophic shifts, but also decreased in variability through ontogeny. In contrast, blacktip reef sharks exhibited increased intraspecific variation in trophic interactions with body size. Variability in trophic interactions and ontogenetic shifts are known to be associated with changes in energetic requirements, but can vary with ecological context. Our results suggest that environmental stability may affect variability within populations, and ecosystems with greater spatial and/or temporal variability in environmental conditions, and those with more diverse food webs may facilitate greater individual differences in trophic interactions, and thus ontogenetic trophic shifts. In light of concerns over environmental disturbance, elucidating the contexts that promote or dampen phenotypic variability is invaluable for predicting population- and community-level responses to environmental changes.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2547  
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Auteur (up) Maury, O.; Poggiale, J.-C. url  openurl
  Titre From individuals to populations to communities: A dynamic energy budget model of marine ecosystem size-spectrum including life history diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Theoretical Biology  
  Volume 324 Numéro Pages 52-71  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; Dynamic Energy Budget theory; predation; Schooling; Size spectrum  
  Résumé  
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  ISSN 0022-5193 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes <p>\textbackslashtextlessp\textbackslashtextgreaterIndividual metabolism, predator–prey relationships, and the role of biodiversity are major factors underlying the dynamics of food webs and their response to environmental variability. Despite their crucial, complementary and interacting influences, they are usually not considered simultaneously in current marine ecosystem models. In an attempt to fill this gap and determine if these factors and their interaction are sufficient to allow realistic community structure and dynamics to emerge, we formulate a mathematical model of the size-structured dynamics of marine communities which integrates mechanistically individual, population and community levels. The model represents the transfer of energy generated in both time and size by an infinite number of interacting fish species spanning from very small to very large species. It is based on standard individual level assumptions of the Dynamic Energy Budget theory (DEB) as well as important ecological processes such as opportunistic size-based predation and competition for food. Resting on the inter-specific body-size scaling relationships of the DEB theory, the diversity of life-history traits (i.e. biodiversity) is explicitly integrated. The stationary solutions of the model as well as the transient solutions arising when environmental signals (e.g. variability of primary production and temperature) propagate through the ecosystem are studied using numerical simulations. It is shown that in the absence of density-dependent feedback processes, the model exhibits unstable oscillations. Density-dependent schooling probability and schooling-dependent predatory and disease mortalities are proposed to be important stabilizing factors allowing stationary solutions to be reached. At the community level, the shape and slope of the obtained quasi-linear stationary spectrum matches well with empirical studies. When oscillations of primary production are simulated, the model predicts that the variability propagates along the spectrum in a given frequency-dependent size range before decreasing for larger sizes. At the species level, the simulations show that small and large species dominate the community successively (small species being more abundant at small sizes and large species being more abundant at large sizes) and that the total biomass of a species decreases with its maximal size which again corroborates empirical studies. Our results indicate that the simultaneous consideration of individual growth and reproduction, size-structured trophic interactions, the diversity of life-history traits and a density-dependent stabilizing process allow realistic community structure and dynamics to emerge without any arbitrary prescription. As a logical consequence of our model construction and a basis for future studies, we define the function Φ as the relative contribution of each species to the total biomass of the ecosystem, for any given size. We argue that this function is a measure of the functional role of biodiversity characterizing the impact of the structure of the community (its species composition) on its function (the relative proportions of losses, dissipation and biological work).\textbackslashtextless/p\textbackslashtextgreater</p> Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 245  
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Auteur (up) Mellon-Duval, C.; Harmelin-Vivien, M.; Metral, L.; Loizeau, V.; Mortreux, S.; Roos, D.; Fromentin, J.-M. doi  openurl
  Titre Trophic ecology of the European hake in the Gulf of Lions, northwestern Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Mar.  
  Volume 81 Numéro 1 Pages 7-18  
  Mots-Clés age; bay; biscay; celtic sea; diet; foodweb; glm; habitat; Merluccius merluccius; merluccius-merluccius l.; predator-prey relationships; Size; small pelagic fish; spatiotemporal variation; stable-isotope ratios; Stable isotopes; Stomach contents  
  Résumé The European hake, Merluccius merluccius, is an important resource for Mediterranean fisheries. This study focuses on juvenile and adult hake feeding ecology in the Gulf of Lions, using information from scientific surveys carried out during two seasons and three years (2004- 2006). Stomach content and stable isotope (delta N-15, delta C-13) analyses were performed, and the main factors explaining variations in delta N-15 were investigated using GLMs. In the Gulf of Lions, hake mostly fed on crustaceans and fish and a dominant piscivorous regime was reached at 15 cm total length. Pelagic fish (sardine, anchovy and small blue whiting) were the main source of prey (40%- 80%) and cannibalism was low (< 5%). The results confirmed that hake is an opportunistic feeder and also showed that the size and diversity of prey vary among hake size classes, probably as a result of the different spatial distribution and/or foraging migrations. The present study finally postulates that the unbalanced sex ratio (80% female against 20% male) observed at the adult stage could be related to the combination of growth pattern differences, diet and exploitation rate on the continental shelf, where the males spend a longer period of time.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0214-8358 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2121  
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Auteur (up) Monsarrat, S.; Pennino, M.G.; Smith, T.D.; Reeves, R.R.; Meynard, C.N.; Kaplan, D.M.; Rodrigues, A.S.L. doi  openurl
  Titre A spatially explicit estimate of the prewhaling abundance of the endangered North Atlantic right whale Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Conserv. Biol.  
  Volume 30 Numéro 4 Pages 783-791  
  Mots-Clés animals; areas de alimentacion; caza de ballenas; Conservation; Eubalaena; eubalaena-glacialis; feeding grounds; generalized additive modeling; historical baseline; historical data; linea base historica; modelado aditivo generalizado; models; pacific; population size; records; tamano de poblacion; target; whaling  
  Résumé The North Atlantic right whale (NARW) (Eubalaena glacialis) is one of the world's most threatened whales. It came close to extinction after nearly a millennium of exploitation and currently persists as a population of only approximately 500 individuals. Setting appropriate conservation targets for this species requires an understanding of its historical population size, as a baseline for measuring levels of depletion and progress toward recovery. This is made difficult by the scarcity of records over this species' long whaling history. We sought to estimate the preexploitation population size of the North Atlantic right whale and understand how this species was distributed across its range. We used a spatially explicit data set on historical catches of North Pacific right whales (NPRWs) (Eubalaena japonica) to model the relationship between right whale relative density and the environment during the summer feeding season. Assuming the 2 right whale species select similar environments, we projected this model to the North Atlantic to predict how the relative abundance of NARWs varied across their range. We calibrated these relative abundances with estimates of the NPRW total prewhaling population size to obtain high and low estimates for the overall NARW population size prior to exploitation. The model predicted 9,075-21,328 right whales in the North Atlantic. The current NARW population is thus <6% of the historical North Atlantic carrying capacity and has enormous potential for recovery. According to the model, in June-September NARWs concentrated in 2 main feeding areas: east of the Grand Banks of Newfoundland and in the Norwegian Sea. These 2 areas may become important in the future as feeding grounds and may already be used more regularly by this endangered species than is thought. Una Estimacion Espacialmente Explicita de la Abundancia Previa a la Caza de la Ballena Franca del Atlantico Norte en Peligro de Extincion La ballena franca del Atlantico Norte (BFAN) (Eubalaena glacialis) es una de las ballenas mas amenazadas del mundo. Su extincion estuvo proxima despues de casi un milenio de explotacion y actualmente persiste una poblacion de aproximadamente 500 individuos. El establecimiento de objetivos de conservacion apropiados para esta especie requiere del entendimiento del tamano historico de la poblacion como la linea base para la medida de los niveles de disminucion y el progreso hacia la recuperacion. Esto se dificulta por la escasez de registros sobre la larga historia de la caza de esta especie. Buscamos estimar el tamano poblacional previo a la explotacion de la ballena franca del Atlantico Norte y entender como se distribuia esta especie a lo largo de su extension. Usamos un conjunto de datos espacialmente explicitos sobre las capturas historicas de las ballenas francas del Pacifico Norte (BFPN) (Eubalaena japonica) para modelar la relacion entre la densidad relativa de ballenas francas y el ambiente durante la temporada de verano de alimentacion. Cuando asumimos que las dos especies de ballenas francas seleccionan ambientes similares, pudimos proyectar este modelo hacia el Atlantico Norte y asi poder predecir como la abundancia relativa de las BFAN vario a lo largo de su extension. Calibramos estas abundancias relativas con los estimados del tamano poblacional total previo a la caza de las BFPN y asi obtener estimados altos y bajos para el tamano poblacional general de las BFAN previo a la explotacion. El modelo predijo la existencia de 9, 075 – 21, 328 ballenas francas en el Atlantico Norte. La poblacion actual de BFAN es entonces <6 % a la capacidad de carga historica del Atlantico Norte, por lo que tiene un potencial enorme para la recuperacion. De acuerdo al modelo, entre junio y septiembre, las BFAN se concentraron en dos areas de alimentacion principales: al este de los Grandes Bancos de Terranova y en el Mar de Noruega. Estas dos areas pueden volverse importantes en el futuro como sitios de alimentacion y puede que ya sean usadas por esta especie de manera mas regular de lo que se cree. Resumen  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0888-8892 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1641  
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