|   | 
Détails
   web
Enregistrements
Auteur Tessier, A.; Blin, C.; Cottet, M.; Kue, K.; Panfili, J.; Chanudet, V.; Descloux, S.; Guillard, J.
Titre (up) Life history traits of the exploited Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus – Cichlidae) in a subtropical reservoir (Lao PDR) Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Cybium
Volume 43 Numéro 1 Pages 71-82
Mots-Clés age-determination; community; fish; Fisheries; growth; l.; Man-made Lake; man-made lakes; nam theun 2; Otolith; perciformes; phytoplankton; population; South-East Asia
Résumé Biological traits of Oreochromis niloticus were studied in order to identify potential differences between the population of the Nam Theun 2 Reservoir and other populations in Asia and in Africa. The study also aimed to characterize the demographic structure of the exploited population by fisheries in the reservoir. Toluidine-stained transverse section of otoliths from 322 specimens, collected between November 2015 and January 2017, were analysed to identify the periodicity of annulus formation and to age individuals. Length, weight, sex and sexual maturity stage were recorded. Life history traits were characterized by length-weight and length age relationships. The periodicity of annulus formation was annual, with complete formation of the translucent zone at the beginning of the warm and wet season (June and July). The length-age key has been established and was composed of 9 age classes, ranging from 0 to 8 years old. Males showed positive allometric growth whereas juveniles and females exhibited isometric growth. The study showed an asymptotic standard length of 658 mm and a low growth rate (K = 0.08 year(-1)). The sex ratio was equilibrated, and first maturity of females was at 277 mm standard length. The population was composed of individuals aged 3 years old and older, and 60% of the landings were composed of individuals aged 5 years and older. The growth rate was lower than for Asian and African populations, and the age-length key provided was specific to the studied reservoir. However, some biological traits of the O. niloticus population were similar to those found for other population in the world: (i) formation of an annual annulus during the reproduction period, at the beginning of the warm and wet season like populations from subtropical countries, and (ii) an isometric or a positive allometric growth as seen in populations that were not overexploited and were living in favourable environmental conditions. Therefore, the present study suggests that the O. niloticus population of the NT2 Reservoir was not overexploited at the time of the survey.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0399-0974 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2553
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Santos, B.S.; Friedrichs, M.A.M.; Rose, S.A.; Barco, S.G.; Kaplan, D.M.
Titre (up) Likely locations of sea turtle stranding mortality using experimentally-calibrated, time and space-specific drift models Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Conserv.
Volume 226 Numéro Pages 127-143
Mots-Clés bycatch; chesapeake bay; Chesapeake Bay; Drift simulations; Endangered species; fisheries; Fisheries and vessel interactions; global patterns; hotspots; ichthyoplankton; manatees; Marine conservation; megafauna; Protected species management; Sea turtle mortality; Sea turtle strandings; vessel; virginia
Résumé Sea turtle stranding events provide an opportunity to study drivers of mortality, but causes of strandings are poorly understood. A general sea turtle carcass oceanographic drift model was developed to estimate likely mortality locations from coastal sea turtle stranding records. Key model advancements include realistic direct wind forcing on carcasses, temperature driven carcass decomposition and the development of mortality location predictions for individual strandings. We applied this model to 2009-2014 stranding events within the Chesapeake Bay, Virginia. Predicted origin of vessel strike strandings were compared to commercial vessel data, and potential hazardous turtle-vessel interactions were identified in the southeastern Bay and James River. Commercial fishing activity of gear types with known sea turtle interactions were compared to predicted mortality locations for stranded turtles with suggested fisheries-induced mortality. Probable mortality locations for these strandings varied seasonally, with two distinct areas in the southwest and southeast portions of the lower Bay. Spatial overlap was noted between potential mortality locations and gillnet, seine, pot, and pound net fisheries, providing important information for focusing future research on mitigating conflict between sea turtles and human activities. Our ability to quantitatively assess spatial and temporal overlap between sea turtle mortality and human uses of the habitat were hindered by the low resolution of human use datasets, especially those for recreational vessel and commercial fishing gear distributions. This study highlights the importance of addressing these data gaps and provides a meaningful conservation tool that can be applied to stranding data of sea turtles and other marine megafauna worldwide.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2433
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Brosset, P.; Le Bourg, B.; Costalago, D.; Banaru, D.; Van Beveren, E.; Bourdeix, J.-H.; Fromentin, J.-M.; Menard, F.; Saraux, C.
Titre (up) Linking small pelagic dietary shifts with ecosystem changes in the Gulf of Lions Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.
Volume 554 Numéro Pages 157-171
Mots-Clés anchovy; anchovy engraulis-encrasicolus; climate; Dietary overlap; fish; food-web; NW Mediterranean; nw mediterranean sea; plankton; regime shifts; Sardine; size-fractionated zooplankton; southern benguela; Sprat; stable-isotope ratios; Trophic ecology
Résumé Since 2008, a severe decrease in size and body condition together with a demographic truncation has been observed in the sardine (secondarily in anchovy) population of the Gulf of Lions (NW Mediterranean Sea). In parallel, sprat biomass, which was negligible before, has increased tenfold. All of these changes have strongly affected the regional fisheries. Using trophic and isotopic data from contrasting periods of low versus high growth and condition, we investigated potential changes in diet and interspecific feeding interactions through time. Evidence of resource partitioning was found between sprat and both anchovy and sardine in 2004 and 2005. Since 2010, the isotopic niches of the 3 species have tended to overlap, suggesting higher risk of competition for food resources. Moreover, the wider trophic niche of sprat indicates higher variability in individual diets. Anchovy and sardine diet varied through time, with a high proportion of large copepods or cladocerans in periods of high growth and condition (1994 and 2007, respectively) versus a dominance of small copepods in the present (2011-2012). Furthermore, an important reduction in prey diversity was also identified in the diet of both anchovy and sardine during the most recent period. Our results support the hypothesis that changes in small pelagic fish growth, size and body condition and ultimately biomass could be due to bottom-up control characterized by changes in food availability and increasing potential trophic competition.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1642
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Sebastian, M.; Smith, A.F.; Gonzalez, J.M.; Fredricks, H.F.; Van Mooy, B.; Koblizek, M.; Brandsma, J.; Koster, G.; Mestre, M.; Mostajir, B.; Pitta, P.; Postle, A.D.; Sanchez, P.; Gasol, J.M.; Scanlan, D.J.; Chen, Y.
Titre (up) Lipid remodelling is a widespread strategy in marine heterotrophic bacteria upon phosphorus deficiency Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Isme J.
Volume 10 Numéro 4 Pages 968-978
Mots-Clés 2 enzymes; agrobacterium-tumefaciens; bacterioplankton groups; Ecology; Mediterranean Sea; mesocosm experiment; microbial food-web; north-atlantic ocean; nutrient limitation; phosphate starvation
Résumé Upon phosphorus (P) deficiency, marine phytoplankton reduce their requirements for P by replacing membrane phospholipids with alternative non-phosphorus lipids. It was very recently demonstrated that a SAR11 isolate also shares this capability when phosphate starved in culture. Yet, the extent to which this process occurs in other marine heterotrophic bacteria and in the natural environment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the substitution of membrane phospholipids for a variety of non-phosphorus lipids is a conserved response to P deficiency among phylogenetically diverse marine heterotrophic bacteria, including members of the Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. By deletion mutagenesis and complementation in the model marine bacterium Phaeobacter sp. MED193 and heterologous expression in recombinant Escherichia coli, we confirm the roles of a phospholipase C (PlcP) and a glycosyltransferase in lipid remodelling. Analyses of the Global Ocean Sampling and Tara Oceans metagenome data sets demonstrate that PlcP is particularly abundant in areas characterized by low phosphate concentrations. Furthermore, we show that lipid remodelling occurs seasonally and responds to changing nutrient conditions in natural microbial communities from the Mediterranean Sea. Together, our results point to the key role of lipid substitution as an adaptive strategy enabling heterotrophic bacteria to thrive in the vast P-depleted areas of the ocean.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1751-7362 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1624
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Ayon, P.; Swartzman, G.; Espinoza, P.; Bertrand, A.
Titre (up) Long-term changes in zooplankton size distribution in the Peruvian Humboldt Current System : conditions favouring sardine or anchovy Type Article scientifique
Année 2011 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Ecology. Progress Series
Volume 422 Numéro Pages 211-222
Mots-Clés abundance; anchovy; Current; dominance; energetics; Euphausiids; Feeding; Humboldt; Sardine; size; System; Zooplankton
Résumé Changes in the size distribution of zooplankton in the Humboldt Current System have been hypothesized to underlie observed changes in sardine and anchovy populations, the dominant pelagic fish species. To examine this hypothesis, the size distribution of over 15 000 zooplankton data samples collected since the 1960s was qualitatively determined. Dominance of each size group of zooplankton (small, medium and large) and of euphausiids was modelled using generalized additive models as a function of year, latitude, time of day, distance from the 200 m isobath (a surrogate for on-shelf versus off-shelf), sea surface temperature and salinity. The temporal (yr) pattern for euphausiid dominance was highly cross-correlated (i.e. was in phase) with the time series for estimated biomass of anchovy, and small zooplankton dominance with that for estimated sardine biomass. This supports the focal hypothesis based on feeding-energetic experiments, which showed energetic advantages to sardine filter feeding on smaller zooplankton and to anchovy bite feeding on larger copepods and euphausiids. Although euphausiids predominate offshore from the shelf break, anchovy biomass is generally highest on the shelf, suggesting a possible mismatch between anchovy feeding and euphausiid dominance. However, evidence concerning the offshore expansion of the anchovy range in cooler conditions, where both anchovy and euphausiids predominate, somewhat alleviates this apparent contradiction. A strong diel component to euphausiids and large zooplankton indicated diel migration for these zooplankton groups. That anchovy will preferentially eat euphausiids when they are more available (i.e. during the night and offshore) is supported by anchovy diet data.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 117
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement