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Auteur (up) Bertrand, S.; Joo, R.; Smet, C.A.; Tremblay, Y.; Barbraud, C.; Weimerskirch, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Local depletion by a fishery can affect seabird foraging Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Applied Ecology  
  Volume 49 Numéro 5 Pages 1168-1177  
  Mots-Clés competition for prey; fishery management; guano-producing seabirds; Peruvian anchovy  
  Résumé Long-term demographic studies show that seabird populations may suffer from competition with fisheries. Understanding this process is critical for the implementation of an ecosystem approach to fisheries management (EAF). Existing studies rely mostly on indirect clues: overlaps between seabird foraging and fishing areas, comparing fish catches by seabirds and vessels. The study is based on a GPS tracking experiment performed in 2007 on one of the main guano-producing seabird species, the Peruvian booby, breeding on an island near the major port for anchovy landings in Peru. The fishery, which is entirely monitored by a Vessel Monitoring System, opened the day we began the tracking experiment, providing a unique opportunity to examine the day-to-day effects of an intense fishing activity on seabird foraging behaviour. We observed a significant increase in the range of the daily trips and distances of the dives by birds from the colony. This increase was significantly related to the concomitant fishing activity. Seabirds progressively became more segregated in space from the vessels. Their increased foraging effort was significantly related to the growing quantity of anchovy removals by the fishery. In addition, daily removals by the fishery were at least 100 times greater than the daily anchovy requirement of the seabird colonies. We conclude that seabirds needed to forage farther to cope with the regional prey depletion created by the intensive fishing behaviour of this open access fishery. Synthesis and applications. We show that the foraging efficiency of breeding seabirds may be significantly affected by not only the global quantity, but also the temporal and spatial patterns of fishery removals. Together with an ecosystem-based definition of the fishery quota, an EAF should limit the risk of local depletion around breeding colonies using, for instance, adaptive marine protected areas.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 172  
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Auteur (up) Espinoza, P.; Bertrand, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Ontogenetic and spatiotemporal variability in anchoveta Engraulis ringens diet off Peru Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Fish Biology  
  Volume 84 Numéro 2 Pages 422-435  
  Mots-Clés euphausiids; Humboldt Current system; oxygen; Peruvian anchovy; spatiotemporal variability; trophic ecology  
  Résumé In this study, historical data available since 1954 were used to get new insight to ontogenetic and spatiotemporal variability in Peruvian anchovy or anchoveta Engraulis ringens diet. Whatever the period, E. ringens foraged mainly on macrozooplankton and the importance of euphausiids in E. ringens diet appears directly related to euphausiids abundance. This bottom-up effect is also observed at smaller scale because the euphausiids fraction increased with E. ringens total length and euphausiids accessibility. Selecting the largest prey, the euphausiids, provides an energetic advantage for E. ringens in its ecosystem where oxygen depletion imposes strong metabolic constraints on pelagic fishes. This study illustrates the plasticity of E. ringens that allows it to cope with its highly variable environment.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 358  
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Auteur (up) Freon, P.; Durand, H.; Avadí, A.; Huaranca, S.; Orozco Moreyra, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Life cycle assessment of three Peruvian fishmeal plants: Toward a cleaner production Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Cleaner Production  
  Volume 145 Numéro Pages 50-63  
  Mots-Clés Animal feed; Cleaner production; fisheries; fishmeal; fish oil; Peruvian anchovy  
  Résumé Fishmeal and fish oil are largely used as input to several animal feed industries all around the world, but there is a lack of life cycle assessments (LCAs) on Peruvian fishmeal plants, despite their predominance in the global supply. LCAs where performed on three different types of Peruvian fishmeal plants with the objective of comparing them and suggesting ways of limiting their impacts. The LCA results can be nested into LCAs of animal feed. Two system boundaries were used: one including the fishery and another excluding it in order to enable other practitioners to use our generic life cycle inventory (LCI) data and LCI analysis. The effects of different processing rates and qualities of fishmeal on environmental impacts were compared. We used the SimaPro software, the ecoinvent 2.2 database and the ReCiPe method. In contrast to many LCA studies, the construction and maintenance phases were considered. Despite the predominant impact of the use phase, in particular consumption of fossil energy, these two phases contribute significantly (>10% using the ReCiPe single score) when fishing is excluded from the system boundaries. Furthermore, existing screening LCAs of the use phase largely underestimate (∼20%) its environmental impacts. The environmental benefit of using natural gas instead of heavy fuel as energy source, in terms of reduced impacts, is huge, reaching 41% of the ReCiPe single score when fishing is excluded and 30% when included. The comparison of environmental impacts between different qualities of fishmeal shows higher impacts of residual fishmeal, intermediate impact of standard fishmeal and lower impacts of Prime fishmeal, the difference between extreme values being more than twofold. Future studies on other fishmeal and residual fishmeal plants should take into account the construction and maintenance phases, and more items in the use phase than in historical screenings. There is room to decrease the environmental impact of this industry in Peru.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0959-6526 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2083  
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Auteur (up) Peraltilla, S.; Bertrand, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre In situ measurements of the speed of Peruvian anchovy schools Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Research  
  Volume 149 Numéro Pages 92-94  
  Mots-Clés Multibeam sonar; Peruvian anchovy; School speed  
  Résumé While speed of fish schools is critical information for parameterizing numerous ecosystem models and evaluating fishery management options, it is poorly documented. Here we present results of in situ measurements of the speed of Peruvian anchovy schools, a small pelagic species that sustain the world's largest mono-specific fishery. Instantaneous school speed was in average 0.6 ms(-1), authorizing theoretical maximum displacements of similar to 26 km day(-1).  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 331  
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Auteur (up) Weimerskirch, H.; Bertrand, S.; Silva, J.; Bost, C.; Peraltilla, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Foraging in Guanay cormorant and Peruvian booby, the major guano-producing seabirds in the Humboldt Current System Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Ecology. Progress Series  
  Volume 458 Numéro Pages 231-245  
  Mots-Clés Peruvian anchovy; Phalacrocorax bougainvillii; Sula variegata; Telemetry  
  Résumé The Humboldt Current System is the most productive upwelling system globally in terms of fish and sustains huge populations of guano-producing birds as well as the world's largest single-species fishery targeting the Peruvian anchovy Engraulis ringens. Peruvian boobies Sula variegata and Guanay cormorants Phalacrocorax bougainvillii are the most abundant seabird species in the system and feed mainly on anchovies. By using high precision GPS and time-depth recorders, we compared the horizontal and vertical movements of the 2 species to examine whether segregation occurs between their foraging areas and whether there is any evidence for prey depletion close to large colonies. A simultaneous acoustic cruise in the foraging area of the 2 bird species estimated the vertical and horizontal distributions of anchovy schools. During the study period in austral spring 2008, the 2 bird species foraged in the same area, at relatively short distance from the colony (average, 19 to 20 km). Both species foraged at similar times of the day, although Peruvian boobies tended to leave earlier in the morning and return later in the evening than did the cormorants. Foraging trips were similar in duration, distance covered and range. Peruvian anchovies were abundant and schools occurred at shallow depths (median, 7 m; range, 3 to 34 m), mainly to the north and west of the colony where foraging bouts of the 2 species overlapped extensively. Cormorants are mainly pelagic surface divers, diving at shallow depths (median, 4 m) but reaching up to 32 m depth, and are thus able to track all the depths at which anchovies occurred during the study period. Peruvian boobies are plunge divers able to reach occasionally 10 m (median, 2 m), and are thus able to reach only shallow anchovy schools. No sex-specific differences in horizontal or vertical movements occurred between males and females in the 2 species. We suggest that the absence of significant differences between horizontal movements of boobies and cormorants, the relative short duration of their trips and the high number of chicks fledged were probably explained by the high abundance and accessibility of anchovies. Differences may be exacerbated during years of low anchovy abundance or accessibility, especially El Nino years.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 224  
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