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Auteur (up) Aubin, J.; Fontaine, C.; Callier, M.; Roque d'orbcastel, E. doi  openurl
  Titre Blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) bouchot culture in Mont-St Michel Bay: potential mitigation effects on climate change and eutrophication Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Int. J. Life Cycle Assess.  
  Volume 23 Numéro 5 Pages 1030-1041  
  Mots-Clés assessment lca; canada; carbon; Carbon sink; Climate change; communities; cultivation; environmental impacts; Eutrophication; lca; life-cycle assessment; Mussel; part; production systems; transfers  
  Résumé Bivalve production is an important aquaculture activity worldwide, but few environmental assessments have focused on it. In particular, bivalves' ability to extract nutrients from the environment by intensely filtering water and producing a shell must be considered in the environmental assessment. LCA of blue mussel bouchot culture (grown out on wood pilings) in Mont Saint-Michel Bay (France) was performed to identify its impact hotspots. The chemical composition of mussel flesh and shell was analyzed to accurately identify potential positive effects on eutrophication and climate change. The fate of mussel shells after consumption was also considered. Its potential as a carbon-sink is influenced by assumptions made about the carbon sequestration in wooden bouchots and in the mussel shell. The fate of the shells which depends on management of discarded mussels and household waste plays also an important role. Its carbon-sink potential barely compensates the climate change impact induced by the use of fuel used for on-site transportation. The export of N and P in mussel flesh slightly decreases potential eutrophication. Environmental impacts of blue mussel culture are determined by the location of production and mussel yields, which are influenced by marine currents and the distance to on-shore technical base. Bouchot mussel culture has low environmental impacts compared to livestock systems, but the overall environmental performances depend on farming practices and the amount of fuel used. Changes to the surrounding ecosystem induced by high mussel density must be considered in future LCA studies.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0948-3349 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2343  
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Auteur (up) Espinosa, F.; Rivera-Ingraham, G.A. doi  isbn
openurl 
  Titre Biological Conservation of Giant Limpets: The Implications of Large Size Type Chapitre de livre
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée  
  Volume Numéro Pages 105-155  
  Mots-Clés cymbula-nigra gastropoda; endangered limpet; lottia-gigantea; marine protected areas; mussel mytilus-galloprovincialis; patella-ferruginea gastropoda; population-structure; scutellastra-argenvillei; sex-change; south-african limpet  
  Résumé Patellogastropods, also known as true limpets, are distributed throughout the world and constitute key species in coastal ecosystems. Some limpet species achieve remarkable sizes, which in the most extreme cases can surpass 35 cm in shell length. In this review, we focus on giant limpets, which are defined as those with a maximum shell size surpassing 10 cm. According to the scientific literature, there are a total of 14 species across five genera that reach these larger sizes. Four of these species are threatened or in danger of extinction. Inhabiting the intertidal zones, limpets are frequently affected by anthropogenic impacts, namely collection by humans, pollution and habitat fragmentation. In the case of larger species, their conspicuous size has made them especially prone to human collection since prehistoric times. Size is not phylogeny-dependent among giant limpets, but is instead related to behavioural traits instead. Larger-sized species tend to be nonmigratory and territorial compared to those that are smaller. Collection by humans has been cited as the main cause behind the decline and/or extinction of giant limpet populations. Their conspicuously large size makes them the preferred target of human collection. Because they are protandric species, selectively eliminating larger specimens of a given population seriously compromises their viability and has led to local extinction events in some cases. Additionally, sustained collection over time may lead to microevolutionary responses that result in genetic changes. The growing presence of artificial structures in coastal ecosystems may cause population fragmentation and isolation, limiting the genetic flow and dispersion capacity of many limpet species. However, when they are necessitated, artificial structures could be managed to establish marine artificial microreserves and contribute to the conservation of giant limpet species that naturally settle on them.  
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  Editeur Elsevier Academic Press Inc Lieu de Publication San Diego Éditeur Curry, B.E.  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Advances in Marine Biology, Vol 76  
  Volume de collection 76 Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-0-12-812402-4 978-0-12-812401-7 Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2180  
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Auteur (up) Espinosa, F.; Rivera-Ingraham, G.A. doi  openurl
  Titre Subcellular evidences of redox imbalance in well-established populations of an endangered limpet. Reasons for alarm? Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Pollut. Bull.  
  Volume 109 Numéro 1 Pages 72-80  
  Mots-Clés antioxidant enzymes; community structure; Conservation; different environmental-conditions; Heavy metals; heavy-metals; marine-invertebrates; mussel mytilus-edulis; Oxidative stress; oyster crassostrea-virginica; Patella ferruginea; patella-ferruginea gastropoda; Pollution; trace-metals  
  Résumé Intertidal species are more vulnerable to anthropogenic disturbances than others inhabiting subtidal and offshore habitats. Coastal development frequently results in trace-metal pollution. For endangered species such as Patella ferruginea it can be a high risk that leads local populations to extinction. Three localities were surveyed, one within a natural and unpolluted area and the other two within the harbor of Ceuta (Strait of Gibraltar), on breakwaters outside and inside. The specimens collected inside the harbor reached 3-fold higher Hg content than for those incoming from the natural area. PERMANOVA test indicated that metal composition of the specimens from inside the harbor was different from the rest. In addition, evidence of cell damage was detected in the specimens from the harbor area. This highlights the urgency of undertaking a physiological evaluation of some of the most vulnerable populations, establishing eco-physiological protocols for monitoring and managing populations settled on artificial substrata. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0025-326x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1635  
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Auteur (up) Ledreux, A.; Serandour, A.L.; Morin, B.; Derick, S.; Lanceleur, R.; Hamlaoui, S.; Furger, C.; Bire, R.; Krys, S.; Fessard, V.; Troussellier, M.; Bernard, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Collaborative study for the detection of toxic compounds in shellfish extracts using cell-based assays. Part II: application to shellfish extracts spiked with lipophilic marine toxins Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Anal. Bioanal. Chem.  
  Volume 403 Numéro 7 Pages 1995-2007  
  Mots-Clés Cell-based bioassays; Collaborative study; Lipophilic phycotoxins; Shellfish extracts; brevetoxins; ciguatoxins; cytotoxicity; cytotoxicity assay; epithelial-cells; human neuroblastoma-cells; mouse bioassay; mussels; okadaic acid; phycotoxins; saxitoxin  
  Résumé Successive unexplained shellfish toxicity events have been observed in Arcachon Bay (Atlantic coast, France) since 2005. The positive mouse bioassay (MBA) revealing atypical toxicity did not match the phytoplankton observations or the liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) investigations used to detect some known lipophilic toxins in shellfish. The use of the three cell lines (Caco2, HepG2, and Neuro2a) allows detection of azaspiracid-1 (AZA1), okadaic acid (OA), or pectenotoxin-2 (PTX2). In this study, we proposed the cell-based assays (CBA) as complementary tools for collecting toxicity data about atypical positive MBA shellfish extracts and tracking their chromatographic fractionation in order to identify toxic compound(s). The present study was intended to investigate the responses of these cell lines to shellfish extracts, which were either control or spiked with AZA1, OA, or PTX2 used as positive controls. Digestive glands of control shellfish were extracted using the procedure of the standard MBA for lipophilic toxins and then tested for their cytotoxic effects in CBA. The same screening strategy previously used with pure lipophilic toxins was conducted for determining the intra- and inter-laboratory variabilities of the responses. Cytotoxicity was induced by control shellfish extracts whatever the cell line used and regardless of the geographical origin of the extracts. Even though the control shellfish extracts demonstrated some toxic effects on the selected cell lines, the extracts spiked with the selected lipophilic toxins were significantly more toxic than the control ones. This study is a crucial step for supporting that cell-based assays can contribute to the detection of the toxic compound(s) responsible for the atypical toxicity observed in Arcachon Bay, and which could also occur at other coastal areas.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1618-2642 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 471  
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Auteur (up) Richard, M.; Bourreau, J.; Montagnani, C.; Ouisse, V.; Le Gall, P.; Fortune, M.; Munaron, D.; Messiaen, G.; Callier, M.D.; Roque d'Orbcastel, E. doi  openurl
  Titre Influence of OSHV-1 oyster mortality episode on dissolved inorganic fluxes: An ex situ experiment at the individual scale Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquaculture  
  Volume 475 Numéro Pages 40-51  
  Mots-Clés carrying-capacity; Crassostrea gigas; crassostrea-gigas spat; eastern oyster; juvenile; la-madeleine quebec; mediterranean thau lagoon; Mineralisation; mortality; mussel mytilus-edulis; mu-var; Nutrient fluxes; Ostreid herpesvirus 1; ostreid herpesvirus-1 infection; oxygen consumption; oxygen-consumption rates; pacific oysters; Spat  
  Résumé Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1 mu var) infection has caused significant mortalities in juvenile oysters (Crassostrea gigas). In contrast to the practices of other animal production industries, sick and dead oysters are not separated from live ones and are left to decay in the surrounding environment, with unknown consequences on fluxes of dissolved materials. A laboratory approach was used in this study to test the influence of oyster mortality episode on dissolved inorganic fluxes at the oyster interface, dissociating (i) the effect of viral infection on metabolism of juvenile oysters and (ii) the effect of flesh decomposition on oxygen consumption and nutrient releases at the individual scale. Nine batches of juvenile oysters (Individual Total wet weight 1 g) were infected via injection of OsHV-1 enriched inoculums at different viral loads (108 and 109 OsHV-1 DNA copies per oyster) to explore infection thresholds. Oysters injected with filtered seawater were used as controls (C). Oysters were maintained under standard conditions to avoid stress linked to hypoxia, starvation, or ammonia excess. Before, after the injection and during the mortality episode, i.e. at days 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14, nine oysters per treatment were incubated in individual metabolic chambers to quantify oxygen, ammonium and phosphate fluxes at the seawater-oyster interface. Nine empty chambers served as a reference. Injections of the two viral loads of OsHV-1 induced similar mortality rates (38%), beginning at day 3 and lasting until day 14. The observed mortality kinetics were slower than those reported in previous experimental pathology studies, but comparable to those observed in the field (Thau lagoon, France). This study highlights that oxygen and nutrient fluxes significantly varied during mortality episode. Indeed (i) OsHV-1 infection firstly modifies oyster metabolism, with significant decreases in oxygen consumption and ammonium excretion, and (ii) dead oysters lead to a strong increase of ammonium (6 fold) and phosphate (41 fold) fluxes and a decrease in the N/P ratio due to mineralisation of their flesh. The latter may modify the structure of the planktonic community in the field during mortality episode. This study is a first step of the MORTAFLUX program. The second step was to in situ confirm this abnormal nutrient loading during a mortality episode and show its impact on bacterio-, phyto-and protozoo-plankton. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2149  
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