|   | 
Détails
   web
Enregistrements
Auteur Keller, S.; Quetglas, A.; Puerta, P.; Bitetto, I.; Casciaro, L.; Cuccu, D.; Esteban, A.; Garcia, C.; Garofalo, G.; Guijarro, B.; Josephides, M.; Jadaud, A.; Lefkaditou, E.; Maiorano, P.; Manfredi, C.; Marceta, B.; Micallef, R.; Peristeraki, P.; Relini, G.; Sartor, P.; Spedicato, M.T.; Tserpes, G.; Hidalgo, M.
Titre Environmentally driven synchronies of Mediterranean cephalopod populations Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Prog. Oceanogr.
Volume 152 Numéro Pages 1-14
Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; balearic sea; Cephalopods; Dynamic factor analysis; ecological niche approach; fisheries; fluctuations; hake merluccius-merluccius; Illex coindetii; life-history; Mediterranean; medits; octopus; Octopus vulgaris; squid; Synchrony; time-series
Résumé The Mediterranean Sea is characterized by large scale gradients of temperature, productivity and salinity, in addition to pronounced mesoscale differences. Such a heterogeneous system is expected to shape the population dynamics of marine species. On the other hand, prevailing environmental and climatic conditions at whole basin scale may force spatially distant populations to fluctuate in synchrony. Cephalopods are excellent case studies to test these hypotheses owing to their high sensitivity to environmental conditions. Data of two cephalopod species with contrasting life histories (benthic octopus vs nectobenthic squid), obtained from scientific surveys carried out throughout the Mediterranean during the last 20 years were analyzed. The objectives of this study and the methods used to achieve them (in parentheses) were: (i) to investigate synchronies in spatially separated populations (decorrelation analysis); (ii) detect underlying common abundance trends over distant regions (dynamic factor analysis, DFA); and (iii) analyse putative influences of key environmental drivers such as productivity and sea surface temperature on the population dynamics at regional scale (general linear models, GLM). In accordance with their contrasting spatial mobility, the distance from where synchrony could no longer be detected (decorrelation scale) was higher in squid than in octopus (349 vs 217 km); for comparison, the maximum distance between locations was 2620 km. The DFA revealed a general increasing trend in the abundance of both species in most areas, which agrees with the already reported worldwide proliferation of cephalopods. DFA results also showed that population dynamics are more similar in the eastern than in the western Mediterranean basin. According to the GLM models, cephalopod populations were negatively affected by productivity, which would be explained by an increase of competition and predation by fishes. While warmer years coincided with declining octopus numbers, areas of high sea surface temperature showed higher densities of squid. Our results are relevant for regional fisheries management and demonstrate that the regionalisation objectives envisaged under the new Common Fishery Policy may not be adequate for Mediterranean cephalopod stocks. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2132
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Sebastian, M.; Smith, A.F.; Gonzalez, J.M.; Fredricks, H.F.; Van Mooy, B.; Koblizek, M.; Brandsma, J.; Koster, G.; Mestre, M.; Mostajir, B.; Pitta, P.; Postle, A.D.; Sanchez, P.; Gasol, J.M.; Scanlan, D.J.; Chen, Y.
Titre Lipid remodelling is a widespread strategy in marine heterotrophic bacteria upon phosphorus deficiency Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Isme J.
Volume 10 Numéro 4 Pages 968-978
Mots-Clés 2 enzymes; agrobacterium-tumefaciens; bacterioplankton groups; Ecology; Mediterranean Sea; mesocosm experiment; microbial food-web; north-atlantic ocean; nutrient limitation; phosphate starvation
Résumé Upon phosphorus (P) deficiency, marine phytoplankton reduce their requirements for P by replacing membrane phospholipids with alternative non-phosphorus lipids. It was very recently demonstrated that a SAR11 isolate also shares this capability when phosphate starved in culture. Yet, the extent to which this process occurs in other marine heterotrophic bacteria and in the natural environment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the substitution of membrane phospholipids for a variety of non-phosphorus lipids is a conserved response to P deficiency among phylogenetically diverse marine heterotrophic bacteria, including members of the Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. By deletion mutagenesis and complementation in the model marine bacterium Phaeobacter sp. MED193 and heterologous expression in recombinant Escherichia coli, we confirm the roles of a phospholipase C (PlcP) and a glycosyltransferase in lipid remodelling. Analyses of the Global Ocean Sampling and Tara Oceans metagenome data sets demonstrate that PlcP is particularly abundant in areas characterized by low phosphate concentrations. Furthermore, we show that lipid remodelling occurs seasonally and responds to changing nutrient conditions in natural microbial communities from the Mediterranean Sea. Together, our results point to the key role of lipid substitution as an adaptive strategy enabling heterotrophic bacteria to thrive in the vast P-depleted areas of the ocean.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1751-7362 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1624
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur MELLON-DUVAL, C.; PONTUAL, H.D.E.; METRAL, L.; QUEMENER, L.
Titre Growth of European hake (Merluccius merluccius) in the Gulf of Lions based on conventional tagging Type Article scientifique
Année 2010 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Ices Journal Of Marine Science
Volume 67 Numéro 1 Pages 62-70
Mots-Clés age estimation; European hake; growth; Mediterranean; tagging
Résumé Growth of European hake was estimated from the results of a conventional tagging study in the Gulf of Lions, the first tagging experiment to have been undertaken on the species in Mediterranean waters. In all, 4277 hake 15–40 cm long were tagged and released on the inshore fishing grounds during spring 2006. The overall recapture rate was 6.5% and times-at-liberty ranged from 1 to 717 d. Growth rate in hake varied with size and sex. The estimated growth parameter (von Bertalanffy k) was estimated as double previously published values based on size frequency distribution in the area. Compared with recent growth parameters derived from the tagging experiments in the Bay of Biscay, k was estimated to be slightly lower in the Gulf of Lions. With this faster growth, hake would mature earlier than previously thought: at age 2 for both sexes, instead of at age 3 or 4 as currently accepted for the Mediterranean. Growth rate by sex decreased to a similar level once fish had attained sexual maturity.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 90
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Dalongeville, A.; Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Albouy, C.; Manel, S.
Titre Ecological traits shape genetic diversity patterns across the Mediterranean Sea: a quantitative review on fishes Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée J. Biogeogr.
Volume 43 Numéro 4 Pages 845-857
Mots-Clés atlantic bluefin tuna; bass dicentrarchus-labrax; climate-change; cod gadus-morhua; ecological traits; effective population-size; genetic diversity; gilthead sea; life-history traits; marine fishes; marine populations; Mediterranean Sea; microsatellite markers; microsatellites; mitochondrial; mitochondrial DNA; molecular markers; population genetics
Résumé AimWe set out to identify the determinants of the variation in genetic diversity among fish species and test whether multi-species genetic diversity is randomly distributed in space. LocationMediterranean Sea. MethodsWe collected genetic diversity data from 39 published studies on Mediterranean fishes (31 species) along with the spatial coordinates of the sampling sites. We focused on microsatellite heterozygosity (151 data points) and mitochondrial haplotype diversity (201 data points). We used linear regressions to link genetic diversity and 11 ecological traits. We also tested for spatial autocorrelation and trends in the residuals. ResultsAmong-species variation in microsatellite heterozygosity was explained by three ecological traits: vertical distribution, migration type and body length. Variation in mitochondrial haplotype diversity was also explained by vertical distribution and migration type, and by reproductive strategy (semelparity). However, vertical distribution and migration type showed opposite effects on microsatellites and mitochondrial diversity. After accounting for the effects of ecological traits, no spatial pattern was detected, except for one of the species considered. Main conclusionsEcological factors explain an important proportion of the among-species genetic diversity. These results suggest that life history strategies of the species influence the variation of microsatellite diversity indirectly through their effect on effective population size, while the spatial variations of genetic diversity seem to be too complex to be identified in our analysis. We found very different effects of traits on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA diversity, which can be explained by the specificities of mitochondrial DNA (absence of recombination, maternal inheritance and non-neutrality).
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1627
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Arnaud-Haond, S.; Aires, T.; Candeias, R.; Teixeira, S.J.L.; Duarte, C.M.; Valero, M.; Serrao, E.A.
Titre Entangled fates of holobiont genomes during invasion: nested bacterial and host diversities in Caulerpa taxifolia Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Mol. Ecol.
Volume 26 Numéro 8 Pages 2379-2391
Mots-Clés Algae; australia; Caulerpa; Chlorophyta; clonal diversity; dna; endophytic communities; genetic diversity; holobiont; invasion paradox; marine invasion; Mediterranean Sea; microsatellite markers; parasites; plant invasions; polymorphism
Résumé Successful prevention and mitigation of biological invasions requires retracing the initial steps of introduction, as well as understanding key elements enhancing the adaptability of invasive species. We studied the genetic diversity of the green alga Caulerpa taxifolia and its associated bacterial communities in several areas around the world. The striking congruence of alpha and beta diversity of the algal genome and endophytic communities reveals a tight association, supporting the holobiont concept as best describing the unit of spreading and invasion. Both genomic compartments support the hypotheses of a unique accidental introduction in the Mediterranean and of multiple invasion events in southern Australia. In addition to helping with tracing the origin of invasion, bacterial communities exhibit metabolic functions that can potentially enhance adaptability and competitiveness of the consortium they form with their host. We thus hypothesize that low genetic diversities of both host and symbiont communities may contribute to the recent regression in the Mediterranean, in contrast with the persistence of highly diverse assemblages in southern Australia. This study supports the importance of scaling up from the host to the holobiont for a comprehensive understanding of invasions.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0962-1083 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2143
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement