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Auteur (up) Jaquemet, S.; Ternon, J.-F.; Kaehler, S.; Thiebot, J.B.; Dyer, B.; Bemanaja, E.; Marteau, C.; Le Corre, M.
Titre Contrasted structuring effects of mesoscale features on the seabird community in the Mozambique Channel Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Research Part II.Topical Studies in Oceanography
Volume 100 Numéro No spécial Pages 200-211
Mots-Clés Foraging habitats; Frigatebird; Marine productivity; Mesoscale eddies; Red-footed booby; Sooty tern; Tropical marine predators; Tuna; Western Indian Ocean
Résumé The Mozambique Channel (western Indian Ocean) is a dynamic environment characterised by strong mesoscale features, which influence all biological components of the pelagic ecosystem. We investigated the distribution, abundance and feeding behaviour of seabirds in the Mozambique Channel in relation to physical and biological environmental variables, with a specific interest in mesoscale features. Seabird censuses were conducted in summer and winter during 7 cruises in the southern and northern Mozambique Channel. Tropical species accounted for 49% of the 37 species identified and 97% of the individuals, and species from the sub-Antarctic region constituted 30% of the identifications. The typically tropical sooty tern (Onychoprion fuscata) was the dominant species during all cruises, and overall accounted for 74% of the species observations and 85% of counted birds. Outputs of Generalised Linear Models at the scale of the Mozambique Channel suggested that higher densities of flying and feeding birds occurred in areas with lower sea surface temperatures and lower surface chlorophyll a concentrations. Most of the flocks of feeding birds did not associate with surface schools of fish or marine mammals, but when they did, these flocks were larger, especially when associated with tuna. While tropical species seemed to favour cyclonic eddies, frontal and divergence zones, non-tropical species were more frequently recorded over shelf waters. Sooty terns foraged preferentially in cyclonic eddies where zooplankton, micronelcton and tuna schools were abundant. Among other major tropical species, frigatebirds (Fregata spp.) predominated in frontal zones between eddies, where tuna schools also frequently occurred and where geostrophic currents were the strongest. Red-footed boobies (Sula sub) concentrated in divergence zones characterised by low sea level anomalies, low geostrophic currents, and high zooplanlcton biomass close to the surface. Our results highlight the importance of mescoscale features in structuring the tropical seabird community in the Mozambique Channel, in addition to segregating tropical and non-tropical species. The mechanisms underlying the segregation of tropical seabirds seem to partially differ from that of other tropical regions, and this may be a consequence of the strong local mesoscale activity, affecting prey size and availability schemes. Beyond characterising the foraging habitats of the seabird community of the Mozambique Channel, this study highlights the importance of this region as a hot spot for seabirds; especially the southern part, where several endangered sub-Antarctic species over-winter.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur Barlow, R.; Marsac, F.; Ternon, J.-F.; Roberts, M.
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 363
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Auteur (up) Navarro, J.; Saez-Liante, R.; Albo-Puigserver, M.; Coll, M.; Palomera, I.
Titre Feeding strategies and ecological roles of three predatory pelagic fish in the western Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume 140 Numéro Pages 9-17
Mots-Clés diet; ecosystem structure; iberian peninsula; indian-ocean; isotope ratios; Marine predators; Pelagic ecosystem; Stable isotopes; stable-isotopes; Stomach contents; swordfish; top predators; Trophic ecology; trophic level; xiphias-gladius; Yellowfin tuna
Résumé Knowing the feeding ecology of marine predators is pivotal to developing an understanding of their ecological role in the ecosystem and determining the trophic relationships between them. Despite the ecological importance of predatory pelagic fish species, research on these species in the Mediterranean Sea is limited. Here, by combining analyses of stomach contents and stable isotope values, we examined the feeding strategies of swordfish, Xiphias gladius, little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus and Atlantic bonito, Sarda sarda, in the western Mediterranean Sea. We also compared the trophic niche and trophic level of these species with published information of other sympatric pelagic predators present in the ecosystem. Results indicated that, although the diet of the three species was composed mainly by fin-fish species, a clear segregation in their main feeding strategies was found. Swordfish showed a generalist diet including demersal species such as blue whiting, Micromesistius poutassou, and European hake, Merluccius merluccius, and pelagic fin-fish such as barracudina species (Arctozenus risso and Lestidiops jayakari) or small pelagic fish species. Little tunny and Atlantic bonito were segregated isotopically between them and showed a diet basically composed of anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, and round sardinella, Sardinella aurita, and sardines, Sardina pilchardus, respectively. This trophic segregation, in addition to potential segregation by depth, is likely a mechanism that allows their potential coexistence within the same pelagic habitat. When the trophic position of these three predatory pelagic fish species is compared with other pelagic predators such as bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, and dolphinfish, Coryphaena hippurus, present in the western Mediterranean Sea, we found that they show similar intermediate trophic position in the ecosystem. In conclusion, the combined stomach and isotopic results highlight, especially for little tunny and Atlantic bonito, the trophic importance of Clupeoid species in their diet. In addition, the importance of demersal resources for swordfish provides evidence for the pelagic-demersal coupling of the ecosystem and the need to manage marine resources in an integrated way. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2175
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