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Auteur Andrello, M.; Mouillot, D.; Somot, S.; Thuiller, W.; Manel, S.
Titre Additive effects of climate change on connectivity between marine protected areas and larval supply to fished areas Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Diversity Distrib.
Volume 21 Numéro 2 Pages 139-150
Mots-Clés Biophysical model; conservation planning; Epinephelus marginatus; larval dispersal; larval growth rate; reproductive timing
Résumé Aim To study the combined effects of climate change on connectivity between marine protected areas (MPAs) and larval supply to the continental shelf. Location The Mediterranean Sea, where sea surface temperatures are expected to strongly increase by the end of the 21st century, represents an archetypal situation with a dense MPA network but resource overexploitation outside. Methods Using an individual-based mechanistic model of larval transport, forced with an emission-driven regional climate change scenario for the Mediterranean Sea, we explored the combined effects of changes in hydrodynamics, adult reproductive timing and larval dispersal on the connectivity among MPAs and their ability to seed fished areas with larvae. Results We show that, over the period 1970–2099, larval dispersal distances would decrease by 10%, the continental shelf area seeded with larvae would decrease by 3% and the larval retention fraction would increase by 5%, resulting in higher concentration of larvae in smaller areas of the continental shelf. However, connectance within the MPA network would increase by 5% as more northern MPAs would become suitable for reproduction with increasing temperatures. We also show that the effects of changes in adult reproductive timing and larval dispersal on connectivity patterns are additive. Main conclusions Climate change will influence connectivity and the effectiveness of MPA networks, and should receive more attention in future conservation planning and large-scale population dynamics.
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ISSN 1472-4642 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1282
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Auteur Arnaud-Haond, S.; Stoeckel, S.; Bailleul, D.
Titre New insights into the population genetics of partially clonal organisms: When seagrass data meet theoretical expectations Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Mol. Ecol.
Volume 29 Numéro 17 Pages 3248-3260
Mots-Clés asexual reproduction; climate-change; clonal growth; differentiation; dispersal; diversity; efficiency; growth; larval dispersal; marine meadows; mating system; migration; ria formosa; seagrass; zostera-marina
Résumé Seagrass meadows are among the most important coastal ecosystems in terms of both spatial extent and ecosystem services, but they are also declining worldwide. Understanding the drivers of seagrass meadow dynamics is essential for designing sound management, conservation and restoration strategies. However, poor knowledge of the effect of clonality on the population genetics of natural populations severely limits our understanding of the dynamics and connectivity of meadows. Recent modelling approaches have described the expected distributions of genotypic and genetic descriptors under increasing clonal rates, which may help us better understand and interpret population genetics data obtained for partial asexuals. Here, in the light of these recent theoretical developments, we revisited population genetics data for 165 meadows of four seagrass species. Contrasting shoot lifespan and rhizome turnover led to the prediction that the influence of asexual reproduction would increase along a gradient fromZostera noltiitoZostera marina, Cymodocea nodosaandPosidonia oceanica, with increasing departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (F-is), mostly towards heterozygote excess, and decreasing genotypic richness (R). This meta-analysis provides a nested validation of this hypothesis at both the species and meadow scales through a significant relationship betweenF(is)andRwithin each species. By empirically demonstrating the theoretical expectations derived from recent modelling approaches, this work calls for the use of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (F-is) rather than only the strongly sampling-sensitiveRto assess the importance of clonal reproduction (c), at least when the impact of selfing onF(is)can be neglected. The results also emphasize the need to revise our appraisal of the extent of clonality and its influence on the dynamics, connectivity and evolutionary trajectory of partial asexuals in general, including in seagrass meadows, to develop the most accurate management strategies.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0962-1083 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000563628600001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2863
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Auteur Cuif, M.; Kaplan, D.M.; Lefèvre, J.; Faure, V.M.; Caillaud, M.; Verley, P.; Vigliola, L.; Lett, C.
Titre Wind-induced variability in larval retention in a coral reef system: a biophysical modelling study in the South-West Lagoon of New Caledonia Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Progress in Oceanography
Volume 122 Numéro Pages 105-115
Mots-Clés Biophysical model; Dascyllus aruanus; Homing; Larval dispersal; New Caledonia; Precompetency; Wind-driven transport
Résumé In the present work, a biophysical dispersal model is used to understand the role of the physical environment in determining reef fish larval dispersal patterns in the South-West Lagoon of New Caledonia. We focus on a reef fish species, the humbug damselfish Dascyllus aruanus, to investigate seasonal variability of simulated larval retention at the scale of a reef patch and at the scale of the lagoon, and to explore links between larval retention and wind variability. The model shows that retention exhibits considerable temporal variability and periodically reaches values much larger than anticipated. Non-zero larval settlement occurs over a large part of the lagoon. Nevertheless, settlement values decrease quickly away from the natal reef and mean dispersal distances are of order 25-35 km. Cross-correlation analyses indicate that weather conditions characterized by strong south east trade winds lead to low retention rates at both local (reef) and regional (lagoon) scales. By contrast, subtropical weather conditions characterized by weak winds result in high retention rates. These results suggest that large-scale weather regimes can be used as proxies for larval retention of the humbug damselfish in the South-West Lagoon of New Caledonia. Nevertheless, relatively small mean dispersal distances suggest that meta-population dynamics occur on relatively small spatial scales.
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ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 318
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Auteur Dubois, M.; Rossi, V.; Ser-Giacomi, E.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Lopez, C.; Hernandez-Garcia, E.
Titre Linking basin-scale connectivity, oceanography and population dynamics for the conservation and management of marine ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Global Ecology and Biogeography Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.
Volume 25 Numéro 5 Pages 503-515
Mots-Clés coral-reef fish; dispersal; genetic-structure; Larval dispersal; local retention; local retention; marine connectivity; marine ecosystems; marine protected areas; mediterranean littoral fishes; Mediterranean Sea; metapopulation; pelagic larval duration; population dynamics; Population Genetics; protected-area design; sea; self-recruitment; sink dynamics; source
Résumé AimAssessing the spatial structure and dynamics of marine populations is still a major challenge in ecology. The need to manage marine resources from ecosystem and large-scale perspectives is recognized, but our partial understanding of oceanic connectivity limits the implementation of globally pertinent conservation planning. Based on a biophysical model for the entire Mediterranean Sea, this study takes an ecosystem approach to connectivity and provides a systematic characterization of broad-scale larval dispersal patterns. It builds on our knowledge of population dynamics and discusses the ecological and management implications. LocationThe semi-enclosed Mediterranean Sea and its marine ecosystems are used as a case study to investigate broad-scale connectivity patterns and to relate them to oceanography and population dynamics. MethodsA flow network is constructed by evenly subdividing the basin into sub-regions which are interconnected through the transport of larvae by ocean currents. It allows for the computation of various connectivity metrics required to evaluate larval retention and exchange. ResultsOur basin-scale model predicts that retention processes are weak in the open ocean while they are significant in the coastal ocean and are favoured along certain coastlines due to specific oceanographic features. Moreover, we show that wind-driven divergent (convergent, respectively) oceanic regions are systematically characterized by larval sources (sinks, respectively). Finally, although these connectivity metrics have often been studied separately in the literature, we demonstrate they are interrelated under particular conditions. Their integrated analysis facilitates the appraisal of population dynamics, informing both genetic and demographic connectivities. Main conclusionsThis modelling framework helps ecologists and geneticists to formulate improved hypotheses of population structures and gene flow patterns and to design their sampling strategy accordingly. It is also useful in the implementation and assessment of future protection strategies, such as coastal and offshore marine reserves, by accounting for large-scale dispersal patterns, a missing component of current ecosystem management.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1655
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Auteur Kaplan, D.M.; Cuif, M.; Fauvelot, C.; Vigliola, L.; Nguyen-Huu, T.; Tiavouane, J.; Lett, C.
Titre Uncertainty in empirical estimates of marine larval connectivity Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.
Volume 74 Numéro 6 Pages 1723-1734
Mots-Clés connectivity; dispersal; Larval dispersal; management; model; parentage analysis; persistence; population; protected areas; Reef fish; reserves; self-recruitment; Transgenerational marking
Résumé Despite major advances in our capacity to measure marine larval connectivity (i.e. the pattern of transport of marine larvae from spawning to settlement sites) and the importance of these measurements for ecological and management questions, uncertainty in experimental estimates of marine larval connectivity has been given little attention. We review potential uncertainty sources in empirical larval connectivity studies and develop Bayesian statistical methods for estimating these uncertainties based on standard techniques in the mark-recapture and genetics literature. These methods are implemented in an existing R package for working with connectivity data, ConnMatTools, and applied to a number of published connectivity estimates. We find that the small sample size of collected settlers at destination sites is a dominant source of uncertainty in connectivity estimates in many published results. For example, widths of 95% CIs for relative connectivity, the value of which is necessarily between 0 and 1, exceeded 0.5 for many published connectivity results, complicating using individual results to conclude that marine populations are relatively closed or open. This “small sample size” uncertainty is significant even for studies with near-exhaustive sampling of spawners and settlers. Though largely ignored in the literature, the magnitude of this uncertainty is straightforward to assess. Better accountability of this and other uncertainties is needed in the future so that marine larval connectivity studies can fulfill their promises of providing important ecological insights and informing management questions (e.g. related to marine protected area network design, and stock structure of exploited organisms). In addition to using the statistical methods developed here, future studies should consistently evaluate and report a small number of critical factors, such as the exhaustivity of spawner and settler sampling, and the mating structure of target species in genetic studies.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2170
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