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Auteur Jaquemet, S.; Ternon, J.-F.; Kaehler, S.; Thiebot, J.B.; Dyer, B.; Bemanaja, E.; Marteau, C.; Le Corre, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Contrasted structuring effects of mesoscale features on the seabird community in the Mozambique Channel Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Research Part II.Topical Studies in Oceanography  
  Volume (down) 100 Numéro No spécial Pages 200-211  
  Mots-Clés Foraging habitats; Frigatebird; Marine productivity; Mesoscale eddies; Red-footed booby; Sooty tern; Tropical marine predators; Tuna; Western Indian Ocean  
  Résumé The Mozambique Channel (western Indian Ocean) is a dynamic environment characterised by strong mesoscale features, which influence all biological components of the pelagic ecosystem. We investigated the distribution, abundance and feeding behaviour of seabirds in the Mozambique Channel in relation to physical and biological environmental variables, with a specific interest in mesoscale features. Seabird censuses were conducted in summer and winter during 7 cruises in the southern and northern Mozambique Channel. Tropical species accounted for 49% of the 37 species identified and 97% of the individuals, and species from the sub-Antarctic region constituted 30% of the identifications. The typically tropical sooty tern (Onychoprion fuscata) was the dominant species during all cruises, and overall accounted for 74% of the species observations and 85% of counted birds. Outputs of Generalised Linear Models at the scale of the Mozambique Channel suggested that higher densities of flying and feeding birds occurred in areas with lower sea surface temperatures and lower surface chlorophyll a concentrations. Most of the flocks of feeding birds did not associate with surface schools of fish or marine mammals, but when they did, these flocks were larger, especially when associated with tuna. While tropical species seemed to favour cyclonic eddies, frontal and divergence zones, non-tropical species were more frequently recorded over shelf waters. Sooty terns foraged preferentially in cyclonic eddies where zooplankton, micronelcton and tuna schools were abundant. Among other major tropical species, frigatebirds (Fregata spp.) predominated in frontal zones between eddies, where tuna schools also frequently occurred and where geostrophic currents were the strongest. Red-footed boobies (Sula sub) concentrated in divergence zones characterised by low sea level anomalies, low geostrophic currents, and high zooplanlcton biomass close to the surface. Our results highlight the importance of mescoscale features in structuring the tropical seabird community in the Mozambique Channel, in addition to segregating tropical and non-tropical species. The mechanisms underlying the segregation of tropical seabirds seem to partially differ from that of other tropical regions, and this may be a consequence of the strong local mesoscale activity, affecting prey size and availability schemes. Beyond characterising the foraging habitats of the seabird community of the Mozambique Channel, this study highlights the importance of this region as a hot spot for seabirds; especially the southern part, where several endangered sub-Antarctic species over-winter.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur Barlow, R.; Marsac, F.; Ternon, J.-F.; Roberts, M.  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 363  
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Auteur Mazel, F.; Renaud, J.; Guilhaumon, F.; Mouillot, D.; Gravel, D.; Thuiller, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Mammalian phylogenetic diversity-area relationships at a continental scale Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology  
  Volume (down) 96 Numéro 10 Pages 2814-2822  
  Mots-Clés Biodiversity; Biogeography; community ecology; conservation; conservation biogeography; habitat loss; habitat loss; null models; overestimate extinction rates; patterns; phylogenetic diversity; richness; species-area; species-area relationship; statistics; strict nested design  
  Résumé In analogy to the species-area relationship (SAR), one of the few laws in ecology, the phylogenetic diversity-area relationship (PDAR) describes the tendency of phylogenetic diversity (PD) to increase with area. Although investigating PDAR has the potential to unravel the underlying processes shaping assemblages across spatial scales and to predict PD loss through habitat reduction, it has been little investigated so far. Focusing on PD has noticeable advantages compared to species richness (SR), since PD also gives insights on processes such as speciation/extinction, assembly rules and ecosystem functioning. Here we investigate the universality and pervasiveness of the PDAR at continental scale using terrestrial mammals as study case. We define the relative robustness of PD (compared to SR) to habitat loss as the area between the standardized PDAR and standardized SAR (i.e., standardized by the diversity of the largest spatial window) divided by the area under the standardized SAR only. This metric quantifies the relative increase of PD robustness compared to SR robustness. We show that PD robustness is higher than SR robustness but that it varies among continents. We further use a null model approach to disentangle the relative effect of phylogenetic tree shape and nonrandom spatial distribution of evolutionary history on the PDAR. We find that, for most spatial scales and for all continents except Eurasia, PDARs are not different from expected by a model using only the observed SAR and the shape of the phylogenetic tree at continental scale. Interestingly, we detect a strong phylogenetic structure of the Eurasian PDAR that can be predicted by a model that specifically account for a finer biogeographical delineation of this continent. In conclusion, the relative robustness of PD to habitat loss compared to species richness is determined by the phylogenetic tree shape but also depends on the spatial structure of PD.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1423  
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Auteur Rossi, F.; Baeta, A.; Marques, J.C. doi  openurl
  Titre Stable isotopes reveal habitat-related diet shifts in facultative deposit-feeders Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Sea Res.  
  Volume (down) 95 Numéro Pages 172-179  
  Mots-Clés Benthos; burying depth; carbon; Estuaries; estuarine habitats; food-web; Macrofauna; marine; polychaete nereis-diversicolor; scrobicularia-plana; Seagrass; seagrass meadows; Sediment; water-flow; zostera-noltii  
  Résumé Seagrass patches interspersed in a sediment matrix may vary environmental conditions and affect feeding habits of consumers and food-web structure. This paper investigates diet shifts between bare sediments and a Zostera noltei (Hornemann, 1832) meadow for three facultative deposit-feeding macrofaunal consumers, notably the bivalve Scrobicularia piano (da Costa, 1778), the polychaete Hediste diversicolor (O.T. Muller, 1776), and the gastropod Hydrobia ulvae (Pennant, 1778). In July 2008, one eelgrass meadow and two bare sediment locations were chosen in the Mondego estuary (40 degrees 08" N, 8 degrees 50'W, Portugal) and sampled for stable isotope signatures (delta C-13 and delta N-15) of macrofauna consumers and some of their potential basal food sources, such as sedimentary organic matter (SOM), microphytobenthos (MPB), seagrass shoots, leaves and seaweeds laying on the surface sediment. The delta N-15 of H. diversicolor was 3% higher in the eelgrass meadow than in bare sediment, indicating a change of trophic position, whereas the Bayesian stable-isotope mixing model showed that S. piano assimilated more macroalgal detritus than microphytobenthos in the eelgrass bed. Such habitat-related diet shifts have the potential to change structure and spatial dynamics of benthic food webs. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1385-1101 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1549  
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Auteur van Gils, J.A.; van der Geest, M.; Jansen, E.J.; Govers, L.L.; de Fouw, J.; Piersma, T. url  openurl
  Titre Trophic cascade induced by molluscivore predator alters pore-water biogeochemistry via competitive release of prey Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology  
  Volume (down) 93 Numéro Pages 1143-1152  
  Mots-Clés Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania bivalves (Dosinia isocardia, Loripes lucinalis) facilitation growth rate hydrogen sulfide interspecific competition predation predator-exclosure experiment Red Knot, Calidris canutus canutus seagrass beds top-down effect toxicity knots calidris-canutus food webs ecological consequences habitat communities coexistence depletion bivalvia sulfide diet  
  Résumé Effects of predation may cascade down the food web. By alleviating interspecific competition among prey, predators may promote biodiversity, but the precise mechanisms of how predators alter competition have remained elusive. Here we report on a predator-exclosure experiment carried out in a tropical intertidal ecosystem, providing evidence for a three-level trophic cascade induced by predation by molluscivore Red Knots (Calidris canutus) that affects pore water biogeochemistry. In the exclosures the knots' favorite prey (Dosinia isocardia) became dominant and reduced the individual growth rate in an alternative prey (Loripes lucinalis). Dosinia, a suspension feeder, consumes suspended particulate organic matter (POM), whereas Loripes is a facultative mixotroph, partly living on metabolites produced by sulfur-oxidizing chemoautotrophic bacteria, but also consuming suspended POM. Reduced sulfide concentrations in the exclosures suggest that, without predation on Dosinia, stronger competition for suspended POM forces Loripes to rely on energy produced by endosymbiotic bacteria, thus leading to an enhanced uptake of sulfide from the surrounding pore water. As sulfide is toxic to most organisms, this competition-induced diet shift by Loripes may detoxify the environment, which in turn may facilitate other species. The inference that predators affect the toxicity of their environment via a multi-level trophic cascade is novel, but we believe it may be a general phenomenon in detritus-based ecosystems.  
  Adresse [van Gils, Jan A.; van der Geest, Matthijs; Jansen, Erik J.; de Fouw, Jimmy; Piersma, Theunis] NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. [Govers, Laura L.] Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Fac Sci, Inst Water & Wetland Res, Dept Environm Sci, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen, Netherlands. [Piersma, Theunis] Univ Groningen, CEES, Anim Ecol Grp, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. van der Geest, M (reprint author), NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, POB 59, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands matthijs.van.der.geest@nioz.nl  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes ISI Document Delivery No.: 946QK Times Cited: 0 Cited Reference Count: 60 van Gils, Jan A. van der Geest, Matthijs Jansen, Erik J. Govers, Laura L. de Fouw, Jimmy Piersma, Theunis Nwo-wotro[w.01.65.221.00] We are grateful to the staff of the Parc National du Banc d'Arguin for allowing us to work and stay in the area under their management. In 2009 we had the pleasant company of Tjisse van der Heide, Han Olff, and Erik Rosendaal, and in 2010 Brecht De Meulenaer joined us. Erik Rosendaal processed fecal samples, and Jeroen Onrust determined shell dry masses. Dick Visser redrew the figures. This work was funded by the NWO-WOTRO Integrated Programme grant W.01.65.221.00 awarded to T. Piersma. Ecological soc amer Washington Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ 722 collection 1384  
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Auteur LELIEVRE, S.; VAZ, S.; Martin, C.S.; LOOTS, C. url  openurl
  Titre Delineating recurrent fish spawning habitats in the North Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal Of Sea Research  
  Volume (down) 91 Numéro Pages 1-14  
  Mots-Clés Egg Distribution; Glm; Habitat Modelling; North sea; Spawning Grounds; temporal variability  
  Résumé The functional value of spawning habitats makes them critically important for the completion of fish life cycles and spawning grounds are now considered to be “essential habitats”. Inter-annual fluctuations in spawning ground distributions of dab (Limanda Limanda), plaice (Pleuronectes platessa), cod (Gadus morhua) and whiting (Merlangius merlangus) were investigated in the southern North Sea and eastern English Channel, from 2006 to 2009. The preferential spawning habitats of these species were modelled using generalised linear models, with egg distribution being used as proxy of spawners’ location. Egg spatial and temporal distributions were explored based on six environmental variables: sea surface temperature and salinity, chlorophyll a concentration, depth, bedstress and seabed sediment types. In most cases, egg density was found to be strongly related to these environmental variables. Egg densities were positively correlated with shallow to intermediate depths having low temperature and relatively high salinity. Habitat models were used to map annual, i.e. 2006 to 2009, winter spatial distributions of eggs, for each species separately. Then, annual maps were combined to explore the spatial variability of each species' spawning grounds, and define recurrent, occasional, rare and unfavourable spawning areas. The recurrent spawning grounds of all four species were located in the south-eastern part of the study area, mainly along the Dutch and German coasts. This study contributes knowledge necessary to the spatial management of fisheries resources in the area, and may also be used to identify marine areas with particular habitat features that need to be preserved.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1385-1101 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 373  
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