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Auteur Massol, F.; Dubart, M.; Calcagno, V.; Cazelles, K.; Jacquet, C.; Kefi, S.; Gravel, D. isbn  openurl
  Titre (up) Island Biogeography of Food Webs Type Chapitre de livre
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée  
  Volume Numéro Pages 183-262  
  Mots-Clés animal abundance; body-size; complex networks; coral-reef fishes; coupled chemical-reactions; ecological communities; experimental zoogeography; habitat loss; power-laws; species-area relationship  
  Résumé To understand why and how species invade ecosystems, ecologists have made heavy use of observations of species colonization on islands. The theory of island biogeography, developed in the 1960s by R.H. MacArthur and E.O. Wilson, has had a tremendous impact on how ecologists understand the link between species diversity and characteristics of the habitat such as isolation and size. Recent developments have described how the inclusion of information on trophic interactions can further inform our understanding of island biogeography dynamics. Here, we extend the trophic theory of island biogeography to assess whether certain food web properties on the mainland affect colonization/extinction dynamics of species on islands. Our results highlight that both food web connectance and size on the mainland increase species diversity on islands. We also highlight that more heavily tailed degree distributions in the mainland food web correlate with less frequent but potentially more important extinction cascades on islands. The average shortest path to a basal species on islands follows a hump-shaped curve as a function of realized species richness, with food chains slightly longer than on the mainland at intermediate species richness. More modular mainland webs are also less persistent on islands. We discuss our results in the context of global changes and from the viewpoint of community assembly rules, aiming at pinpointing further theoretical developments needed to make the trophic theory of island biogeography even more useful for fundamental and applied ecology.  
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  Editeur Elsevier Academic Press Inc Lieu de Publication San Diego Éditeur Bohan, D.A.; Dumbrell, A.J.; Massol, F.  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Networks of Invasion: A Synthesis of Concepts  
  Volume de collection 56 Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-0-12-804331-8 978-0-12-804338-7 Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2174  
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Auteur Matthews, T.J.; Triantis, K.A.; Rigal, F.; Borregaard, M.K.; Guilhaumon, F.; Whittaker, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Island species–area relationships and species accumulation curves are not equivalent: an analysis of habitat island datasets Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography  
  Volume 25 Numéro 5 Pages 607-618  
  Mots-Clés Boosted regression trees; conservation biogeography; fragmentation; habitat islands; island biogeography; island species–area relationship; macroecology; nestedness; species accumulation curve; species–area relationship  
  Résumé Aim The relationship between species number and area is of fundamental importance in macroecology and conservation science, yet the implications of different means of quantitative depiction of the relationship remain contentious. We set out (1) to establish the variation in form of the relationship between two distinct methods applied to the same habitat island datasets, (2) to explore the relevance of several key dataset properties for variation in the parameters of these relationships, and (3) to assess the implications for application of the resulting models. Locations Global. Methods Through literature search we compiled 97 habitat island datasets. For each we analysed the form of the island species–area relationship (ISAR) and several versions of species accumulation curve (SAC), giving priority to a randomized form (Ran-SAC). Having established the validity of the power model, we compared the slopes (z-values) between the ISAR and the SAC for each dataset. We used boosted regression tree and simulation analyses to investigate the effect of nestedness and other variables in driving observed differences in z-values between ISARs and SACs. Results The Ran-SAC was steeper than the ISAR in 77% of datasets. The differences were primarily driven by the degree of nestedness, although other variables (e.g. the number of islands in a dataset) were also important. The ISAR was often a poor predictor of archipelago species richness. Main conclusions Slopes of the ISAR and SAC for the same data set can vary substantially, revealing their non-equivalence, with implications for applications of species–area curve parameters in conservation science. For example, the ISAR was a poor predictor of archipelagic richness in datasets with a low degree of nestedness. Caution should be employed when using the ISAR for the purposes of extrapolation and prediction in habitat island systems.  
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  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1559  
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Auteur Mazel, F.; Renaud, J.; Guilhaumon, F.; Mouillot, D.; Gravel, D.; Thuiller, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Mammalian phylogenetic diversity-area relationships at a continental scale Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology  
  Volume 96 Numéro 10 Pages 2814-2822  
  Mots-Clés Biodiversity; Biogeography; community ecology; conservation; conservation biogeography; habitat loss; habitat loss; null models; overestimate extinction rates; patterns; phylogenetic diversity; richness; species-area; species-area relationship; statistics; strict nested design  
  Résumé In analogy to the species-area relationship (SAR), one of the few laws in ecology, the phylogenetic diversity-area relationship (PDAR) describes the tendency of phylogenetic diversity (PD) to increase with area. Although investigating PDAR has the potential to unravel the underlying processes shaping assemblages across spatial scales and to predict PD loss through habitat reduction, it has been little investigated so far. Focusing on PD has noticeable advantages compared to species richness (SR), since PD also gives insights on processes such as speciation/extinction, assembly rules and ecosystem functioning. Here we investigate the universality and pervasiveness of the PDAR at continental scale using terrestrial mammals as study case. We define the relative robustness of PD (compared to SR) to habitat loss as the area between the standardized PDAR and standardized SAR (i.e., standardized by the diversity of the largest spatial window) divided by the area under the standardized SAR only. This metric quantifies the relative increase of PD robustness compared to SR robustness. We show that PD robustness is higher than SR robustness but that it varies among continents. We further use a null model approach to disentangle the relative effect of phylogenetic tree shape and nonrandom spatial distribution of evolutionary history on the PDAR. We find that, for most spatial scales and for all continents except Eurasia, PDARs are not different from expected by a model using only the observed SAR and the shape of the phylogenetic tree at continental scale. Interestingly, we detect a strong phylogenetic structure of the Eurasian PDAR that can be predicted by a model that specifically account for a finer biogeographical delineation of this continent. In conclusion, the relative robustness of PD to habitat loss compared to species richness is determined by the phylogenetic tree shape but also depends on the spatial structure of PD.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1423  
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Auteur van Gils, J.A.; van der Geest, M.; De Meulenaer, B.; Gillis, H.; Piersma, T.; Folmer, E.O. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) Moving on with foraging theory: incorporating movement decisions into the functional response of a gregarious shorebird Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Animal Ecology  
  Volume 84 Numéro Pages 554-564  
  Mots-Clés competition continuous-time Markov chain cryptic interference diet distribution habitat choice intake rate movement ecology predation toxic prey SPATIAL-DISTRIBUTION RED KNOTS MODELING INTERFERENCE CRYPTIC INTERFERENCE STOCHASTIC VERSION BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY MULTISTATE MODELS BANC-DARGUIN GROUP-SIZE PREY Ecology Zoology  
  Résumé 1. Models relating intake rate to food abundance and competitor density (generalized functional response models) can predict forager distributions and movements between patches, but we lack understanding of how distributions and small-scale movements by the foragers themselves affect intake rates. Using a state-of-the-art approach based on continuous-time Markov chain dynamics, we add realism to classic functional response models by acknowledging that the chances to encounter food and competitors are influenced by movement decisions, and, vice versa, that movement decisions are influenced by these encounters. We used a multi-state modelling framework to construct a stochastic functional response model in which foragers alternate between three behavioural states: searching, handling and moving. Using behavioural observations on a molluscivore migrant shorebird (red knot, Calidris canutus canutus), at its main wintering area (Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania), we estimated transition rates between foraging states as a function of conspecific densities and densities of the two main bivalve prey. Intake rate decreased with conspecific density. This interference effect was not due to decreased searching efficiency, but resulted from time lost to avoidance movements. Red knots showed a strong functional response to one prey (Dosinia isocardia), but a weak response to the other prey (Loripes lucinalis). This corroborates predictions from a recently developed optimal diet model that accounts for the mildly toxic effects due to consuming Loripes. Using model averaging across the most plausible multi-state models, the fully parameterized functional response model was then used to predict intake rate for an independent data set on habitat choice by red knot. Comparison of the sites selected by red knots with random sampling sites showed that the birds fed at sites with higher than average Loripes and Dosinia densities, that is sites for which we predicted higher than average intake rates. We discuss the limitations of Holling's classic functional response model which ignores movement and the limitations of contemporary movement ecological theory that ignores consumer-resource interactions. With the rapid advancement of technologies to track movements of individual foragers at fine spatial scales, the time is ripe to integrate descriptive tracking studies with stochastic movement-based functional response models.  
  Adresse [van Gils, Jan A.; van der Geest, Matthijs; De Meulenaer, Brecht; Gillis, Hanneke; Piersma, Theunis; Folmer, Eelke O.] NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. [van der Geest, Matthijs; Piersma, Theunis] Univ Groningen, Anim Ecol Grp, Ctr Ecol & Evolutionary Studies CEES, Chair Global Flyway Ecol, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. van Gils, JA (reprint author), NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, POB 59, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. Jan.van.Gils@nioz.nl  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes ISI Document Delivery No.: CB9RB Times Cited: 0 Cited Reference Count: 61 van Gils, Jan A. van der Geest, Matthijs De Meulenaer, Brecht Gillis, Hanneke Piersma, Theunis Folmer, Eelke O. NWO WOTRO [W.01.65.221.00]; NWO [R 84-639]; NWO VIDI [864.09.002] We thank Parc National du Banc d'Arguin (PNBA) for their hospitality, the hosting of our presence and the permission to work in and from the Iwik scientific station. Lemhaba ould Yarba made the logistic arrangements. Joop van Eerbeek, Erik J. Jansen, Han Olff and El-Hacen Mohamed El-Hacen helped collecting and sorting benthos samples. Valuable comments on the manuscript were given by Allert Bijleveld, Jaap van der Meer, Ola Olsson, Thomas Oudman, Isabel M. Smallegange, an anonymous referee and by the 'literature club' of the Centre for Integrative Ecology during JAvG's sabbatical at Deakin University. Dick Visser polished the figures. This work is supported by an NWO WOTRO Integrated Programme grant (W.01.65.221.00) to TP, an NWO travel grant (R 84-639) to EOF, and an NWO VIDI grant (864.09.002) to JAvG. 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL HOBOKEN J ANIM ECOL Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ 1412 collection 1383  
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Auteur Garcon, V.; Karstensen, J.; Palacz, A.; Telszewski, M.; Aparco Lara, T.; Breitburg, D.; Chavez, F.; Coelho, P.; Cornejo-D'Ottone, M.; Santos, C.; Fiedler, B.; Gallo, N.D.; Gregoire, M.; Gutierrez, D.; Hernandez-Ayon, M.; Isensee, K.; Koslow, T.; Levin, L.; Marsac, F.; Maske, H.; Mbaye, B.C.; Montes, I.; Naqvi, W.; Pearlman, J.; Pinto, E.; Pitcher, G.; Pizarro, O.; Rose, K.; Shenoy, D.; Van der Plas, A.; Vito, M.R.; Weng, K. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) Multidisciplinary Observing in the World Ocean's Oxygen Minimum Zone Regions: From Climate to Fish – The VOICE Initiative Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Numéro Pages 722  
  Mots-Clés continental-shelf; demersal fishes; ecosystem; growth; habitat compression; humboldt current system; hypoxia; multidisciplinary; ocean observing system; oxycline; oxygen minimum zones; readiness level; reproduction; responses; variability  
  Résumé Multidisciplinary ocean observing activities provide critical ocean information to satisfy ever-changing socioeconomic needs and require coordinated implementation. The upper oxycline (transition between high and low oxygen waters) is fundamentally important for the ecosystem structure and can be a useful proxy for multiple observing objectives connected to eastern boundary systems (EBSs) that neighbor oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). The variability of the oxycline and its impact on the ecosystem (VOICE) initiative demonstrates how societal benefits drive the need for integration and optimization of biological, biogeochemical, and physical components of regional ocean observing related to EBS. In liaison with the Global Ocean Oxygen Network, VOICE creates a roadmap toward observation-model syntheses for a comprehensive understanding of selected oxycline-dependent objectives. Local to global effects, such as habitat compression or deoxygenation trends, prompt for comprehensive observing of the oxycline on various space and time scales, and for an increased awareness of its impact on ecosystem services. Building on the Framework for Ocean Observing (FOO), we present a first readiness level assessment for ocean observing of the oxycline in EBS. This was to determine current ocean observing design and future needs in EBS regions (e.g., the California Current System, the Equatorial Eastern Pacific off Ecuador, the Peru-Chile Current system, the Northern Benguela off Namibia, etc.) building on the FOO strategy. We choose regional champions to assess the ocean observing design elements proposed in the FOO, namely, requirement processes, coordination of observational elements, and data management and information products and the related best practices. The readiness level for the FOO elements was derived for each EBS through a similar and very general ad hoc questionnaire. Despite some weaknesses in the questionnaire design and its completion, an assessment was achievable. We found that fisheries and ecosystem management are a societal requirement for all regions, but maturity levels of observational elements and data management and information products differ substantially. Identification of relevant stakeholders, developing strategies for readiness level improvements, and building and sustaining infrastructure capacity to implement these strategies are fundamental milestones for the VOICE initiative over the next 2-5 years and beyond.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
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  ISSN ISBN Médium  
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  Notes WOS:000502961900001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2702  
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