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Auteur Giannoulaki, M.; Iglesias, M.; Tugores, M.P.; Bonanno, A.; Patti, B.; Felice, A.D.; Leonori, I.; BIGOT, J.-L.; Ticina, V.; Pyrounaki, M.M.; Tsagarakis, K.; Machias, A.; Somarakis, S.; Schismenou, E.; Quinci, E.; Basilone, G.; Cuttitta, A.; Campanella, F.; Miquel, J.; Onate, D.; ROOS, D.; Valavanis, V.
Titre (up) Characterizing the potential habitat of European anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus in the Mediterranean Sea, at different life stages Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Oceanography
Volume 22 Numéro 2 Pages 69-89
Mots-Clés anchovy; anchovy potential nurseries; habitat suitability modelling; Mediterranean sea; small pelagics
Résumé Identification of the potential habitat of European anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) at different life stages in relation to environmental conditions is an interesting subject from both ecological and management points of view. For this purpose, acoustic data from different seasons and different parts of the Mediterranean Sea along with satellite environmental and bathymetry data were modelled using generalized additive models. Similarly, egg distribution data from summer ichthyoplankton surveys were used to model potential spawning habitat. Selected models were used to produce maps presenting the probability of anchovy presence (adults, juveniles and eggs) in the entire Mediterranean basin, as a measure of habitat adequacy. Bottom depth and sea surface chlorophyll concentration were the variables found important in all models. Potential anchovy habitats were located over the continental shelf for all life stages examined. An expansion of the potential habitat from the peak spawning (early summer) to the late spawning season (early autumn) was observed. However, the most suitable areas for the presence of anchovy spawners seem to maintain the same size between seasons. Potential juvenile habitats were associated with highly productive inshore waters, being less extended and closer to coast during winter than late autumn. Potential spawning habitat in June and July based on ichthyoplankton surveys overlapped but were wider in extent compared with adult potential habitat from acoustics in the same season. Similarities and dissimilarities between the anchovy habitats as well as comparisons with sardine habitats in the oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea and other ecosystems with higher productivity are discussed.
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Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1054-6006 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 240
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Auteur Morato, T.; Gonzalez-Irusta, J.-M.; Dominguez-Carrio, C.; Wei, C.-L.; Davies, A.; Sweetman, A.K.; Taranto, G.H.; Beazley, L.; Garcia-Alegre, A.; Grehan, A.; Laffargue, P.; Murillo, F.J.; Sacau, M.; Vaz, S.; Kenchington, E.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Callery, O.; Chimienti, G.; Cordes, E.; Egilsdottir, H.; Freiwald, A.; Gasbarro, R.; Gutierrez-Zarate, C.; Gianni, M.; Gilkinson, K.; Wareham Hayes, V.E.; Hebbeln, D.; Hedges, K.; Henry, L.-A.; Johnson, D.; Koen-Alonso, M.; Lirette, C.; Mastrototaro, F.; Menot, L.; Molodtsova, T.; Duran Munoz, P.; Orejas, C.; Pennino, M.G.; Puerta, P.; Ragnarsson, S. a; Ramiro-Sanchez, B.; Rice, J.; Rivera, J.; Roberts, J.M.; Ross, S.W.; Rueda, J.L.; Sampaio, I.; Snelgrove, P.; Stirling, D.; Treble, M.A.; Urra, J.; Vad, J.; van Oevelen, D.; Watling, L.; Walkusz, W.; Wienberg, C.; Woillez, M.; Levin, L.A.; Carreiro-Silva, M.
Titre (up) Climate-induced changes in the suitable habitat of cold-water corals and commercially important deep-sea fishes in the North Atlantic Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés calcification rates; climate change; cod gadus-morhua; cold-water corals; deep-sea; envelope models; fisheries; fishes; habitat suitability modelling; lophelia-pertusa; ocean acidification; octocorals; protected areas; scleractinian corals; scleractinians; species distribution models; species distribution models; thermal tolerance; vulnerable marine ecosystems
Résumé The deep sea plays a critical role in global climate regulation through uptake and storage of heat and carbon dioxide. However, this regulating service causes warming, acidification and deoxygenation of deep waters, leading to decreased food availability at the seafloor. These changes and their projections are likely to affect productivity, biodiversity and distributions of deep-sea fauna, thereby compromising key ecosystem services. Understanding how climate change can lead to shifts in deep-sea species distributions is critically important in developing management measures. We used environmental niche modelling along with the best available species occurrence data and environmental parameters to model habitat suitability for key cold-water coral and commercially important deep-sea fish species under present-day (1951-2000) environmental conditions and to project changes under severe, high emissions future (2081-2100) climate projections (RCP8.5 scenario) for the North Atlantic Ocean. Our models projected a decrease of 28%-100% in suitable habitat for cold-water corals and a shift in suitable habitat for deep-sea fishes of 2.0 degrees-9.9 degrees towards higher latitudes. The largest reductions in suitable habitat were projected for the scleractinian coral Lophelia pertusa and the octocoral Paragorgia arborea, with declines of at least 79% and 99% respectively. We projected the expansion of suitable habitat by 2100 only for the fishes Helicolenus dactylopterus and Sebastes mentella (20%-30%), mostly through northern latitudinal range expansion. Our results projected limited climate refugia locations in the North Atlantic by 2100 for scleractinian corals (30%-42% of present-day suitable habitat), even smaller refugia locations for the octocorals Acanella arbuscula and Acanthogorgia armata (6%-14%), and almost no refugia for P. arborea. Our results emphasize the need to understand how anticipated climate change will affect the distribution of deep-sea species including commercially important fishes and foundation species, and highlight the importance of identifying and preserving climate refugia for a range of area-based planning and management tools.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000514391400001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2752
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Auteur Virgili, A.; Authier, M.; Boisseau, O.; Cañadas, A.; Claridge, D.; Cole, T.; Corkeron, P.; Dorémus, G.; David, L.; Di‐Méglio, N.; Dunn, C.; Dunn, T.E.; García‐Barón, I.; Laran, S.; Lauriano, G.; Lewis, M.; Louzao, M.; Mannocci, L.; Martínez‐Cedeira, J.; Palka, D.; Panigada, S.; Pettex, E.; Roberts, J.J.; Ruiz, L.; Saavedra, C.; Santos, M.B.; Canneyt, O.V.; Bonales, J.A.V.; Monestiez, P.; Ridoux, V.
Titre (up) Combining multiple visual surveys to model the habitat of deep-diving cetaceans at the basin scale Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography
Volume 28 Numéro 3 Pages 300-314
Mots-Clés beaked whales; data-assembling; deep-diving cetaceans; habitat modelling; kogiids; sperm whales
Résumé Aim Deep-diving cetaceans are oceanic species exposed to multiple anthropogenic pressures including high intensity underwater noise, and knowledge of their distribution is crucial to manage their conservation. Due to intrinsic low densities, wide distribution ranges and limited presence at the sea surface, these species are rarely sighted. Pooling data from multiple visual surveys sharing a common line-transect methodology can increase sightings but requires accounting for heterogeneity in protocols and platforms. Location North Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. Time period 1998 to 2015. Major taxa Ziphiidae; Physeteriidae; Kogiidae. Methods About 1,240,000 km of pooled effort provided 630 sightings of ziphiids, 836 of physeteriids and 106 of kogiids. For each taxon, we built a hierarchical model to estimate the effective strip width depending on observation conditions and survey types. We then modelled relative densities in a generalized additive modelling framework. Geographical predictions were limited to interpolations identified with a gap analysis of environmental space coverage. Results Deeper areas of the North Atlantic gyre were mostly environmental extrapolation in the predictions, thereby highlighting gaps in sampling across the different surveys. For the three species groups, the highest relative densities were predicted along continental slopes, particularly in the western North Atlantic Ocean where the Gulf Stream creates dynamic frontal zones and eddies. Main conclusions Pooling a large number of surveys provided the first basin-wide models of distribution for deep-diving cetaceans, including several data-deficient taxa, across the North Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. These models can help the conservation of elusive and poorly known marine megafauna.
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Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium
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Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2756
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Auteur Jaquemet, S.; Ternon, J.-F.; Kaehler, S.; Thiebot, J.B.; Dyer, B.; Bemanaja, E.; Marteau, C.; Le Corre, M.
Titre (up) Contrasted structuring effects of mesoscale features on the seabird community in the Mozambique Channel Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Research Part II.Topical Studies in Oceanography
Volume 100 Numéro No spécial Pages 200-211
Mots-Clés Foraging habitats; Frigatebird; Marine productivity; Mesoscale eddies; Red-footed booby; Sooty tern; Tropical marine predators; Tuna; Western Indian Ocean
Résumé The Mozambique Channel (western Indian Ocean) is a dynamic environment characterised by strong mesoscale features, which influence all biological components of the pelagic ecosystem. We investigated the distribution, abundance and feeding behaviour of seabirds in the Mozambique Channel in relation to physical and biological environmental variables, with a specific interest in mesoscale features. Seabird censuses were conducted in summer and winter during 7 cruises in the southern and northern Mozambique Channel. Tropical species accounted for 49% of the 37 species identified and 97% of the individuals, and species from the sub-Antarctic region constituted 30% of the identifications. The typically tropical sooty tern (Onychoprion fuscata) was the dominant species during all cruises, and overall accounted for 74% of the species observations and 85% of counted birds. Outputs of Generalised Linear Models at the scale of the Mozambique Channel suggested that higher densities of flying and feeding birds occurred in areas with lower sea surface temperatures and lower surface chlorophyll a concentrations. Most of the flocks of feeding birds did not associate with surface schools of fish or marine mammals, but when they did, these flocks were larger, especially when associated with tuna. While tropical species seemed to favour cyclonic eddies, frontal and divergence zones, non-tropical species were more frequently recorded over shelf waters. Sooty terns foraged preferentially in cyclonic eddies where zooplankton, micronelcton and tuna schools were abundant. Among other major tropical species, frigatebirds (Fregata spp.) predominated in frontal zones between eddies, where tuna schools also frequently occurred and where geostrophic currents were the strongest. Red-footed boobies (Sula sub) concentrated in divergence zones characterised by low sea level anomalies, low geostrophic currents, and high zooplanlcton biomass close to the surface. Our results highlight the importance of mescoscale features in structuring the tropical seabird community in the Mozambique Channel, in addition to segregating tropical and non-tropical species. The mechanisms underlying the segregation of tropical seabirds seem to partially differ from that of other tropical regions, and this may be a consequence of the strong local mesoscale activity, affecting prey size and availability schemes. Beyond characterising the foraging habitats of the seabird community of the Mozambique Channel, this study highlights the importance of this region as a hot spot for seabirds; especially the southern part, where several endangered sub-Antarctic species over-winter.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur Barlow, R.; Marsac, F.; Ternon, J.-F.; Roberts, M.
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
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Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 363
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Auteur LELIEVRE, S.; VAZ, S.; Martin, C.S.; LOOTS, C.
Titre (up) Delineating recurrent fish spawning habitats in the North Sea Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal Of Sea Research
Volume 91 Numéro Pages 1-14
Mots-Clés Egg Distribution; Glm; Habitat Modelling; North sea; Spawning Grounds; temporal variability
Résumé The functional value of spawning habitats makes them critically important for the completion of fish life cycles and spawning grounds are now considered to be “essential habitats”. Inter-annual fluctuations in spawning ground distributions of dab (Limanda Limanda), plaice (Pleuronectes platessa), cod (Gadus morhua) and whiting (Merlangius merlangus) were investigated in the southern North Sea and eastern English Channel, from 2006 to 2009. The preferential spawning habitats of these species were modelled using generalised linear models, with egg distribution being used as proxy of spawners’ location. Egg spatial and temporal distributions were explored based on six environmental variables: sea surface temperature and salinity, chlorophyll a concentration, depth, bedstress and seabed sediment types. In most cases, egg density was found to be strongly related to these environmental variables. Egg densities were positively correlated with shallow to intermediate depths having low temperature and relatively high salinity. Habitat models were used to map annual, i.e. 2006 to 2009, winter spatial distributions of eggs, for each species separately. Then, annual maps were combined to explore the spatial variability of each species' spawning grounds, and define recurrent, occasional, rare and unfavourable spawning areas. The recurrent spawning grounds of all four species were located in the south-eastern part of the study area, mainly along the Dutch and German coasts. This study contributes knowledge necessary to the spatial management of fisheries resources in the area, and may also be used to identify marine areas with particular habitat features that need to be preserved.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1385-1101 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 373
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