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Auteur Christensen, V.; Coll, M.; Steenbeek, J.; Buszowski, J.; Chagaris, D.; Walters, C.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Representing Variable Habitat Quality in a Spatial Food Web Model Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecosystems  
  Volume 17 Numéro 8 Pages 1397-1412  
  Mots-Clés Ecology; Ecopath; ecospace; Environmental Management; food web model; foraging capacity model; Geoecology/Natural Processes; habitat modeling; Hydrology/Water Resources; Plant Sciences; sampling; simulation model; species distribution model; Zoology  
  Résumé Why are marine species where they are? The scientific community is faced with an urgent need to understand aquatic ecosystem dynamics in the context of global change. This requires development of scientific tools with the capability to predict how biodiversity, natural resources, and ecosystem services will change in response to stressors such as climate change and further expansion of fishing. Species distribution models and ecosystem models are two methodologies that are being developed to further this understanding. To date, these methodologies offer limited capabilities to work jointly to produce integrated assessments that take both food web dynamics and spatial-temporal environmental variability into account. We here present a new habitat capacity model as an implementation of the spatial-temporal model Ecospace of the Ecopath with Ecosim approach. The new model offers the ability to drive foraging capacity of species from the cumulative impacts of multiple physical, oceanographic, and environmental factors such as depth, bottom type, temperature, salinity, oxygen concentrations, and so on. We use a simulation modeling procedure to evaluate sampling characteristics of the new habitat capacity model. This development bridges the gap between envelope environmental models and classic ecosystem food web models, progressing toward the ability to predict changes in marine ecosystems under scenarios of global change and explicitly taking food web direct and indirect interactions into account.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1432-9840, 1435-0629 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1196  
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Auteur Kappes, M.A.; Shaffer, S.A.; Tremblay, Y.; Foley, D.G.; Palacios, D.M.; Bograd, S.J.; Costa, D.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Reproductive constraints influence habitat accessibility, segregation, and preference of sympatric albatross species Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Movement Ecology  
  Volume 3 Numéro 1 Pages 34  
  Mots-Clés Activity patterns; Black-footed albatross; Foraging behavior; Geolocation; Habitat selection; Laysan albatross; Satellite tracking; Spatial modeling; Spatial segregation  
  Résumé The spatiotemporal distribution of animals is dependent on a suite of factors, including the distribution of resources, interactions within and between species, physiological limitations, and requirements for reproduction, dispersal, or migration. During breeding, reproductive constraints play a major role in the distribution and behavior of central place foragers, such as pelagic seabirds. We examined the foraging behavior and marine habitat selection of Laysan (Phoebastria immutabilis) and black-footed (P. nigripes) albatrosses throughout their eight month breeding cycle at Tern Island, Northwest Hawaiian Islands to evaluate how variable constraints of breeding influenced habitat availability and foraging decisions. We used satellite tracking and light-based geolocation to determine foraging locations of individuals, and applied a biologically realistic null usage model to generate control locations and model habitat preference under a case–control design. Remotely sensed oceanographic data were used to characterize albatross habitats in the North Pacific.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2051-3933 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1460  
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Auteur van der Geest, M.; van der Lely, J.A.C.; van Gils, J.A.; Piersma, T.; Lok, T. url  doi
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  Titre Density-dependent growth of bivalves dominating the intertidal zone of Banc d’Arguin, Mauritania: importance of feeding mode, habitat and season Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Ecology Progress Series  
  Volume 610 Numéro Pages 51-63  
  Mots-Clés Carrying capacity; Chemosymbiosis; Density dependence; Environmental heterogeneity; Feeding guild; Seagrass; Soft-sediment habitat  
  Résumé Accurate predictions of population dynamics require an understanding of the ways by which environmental conditions and species-specific traits affect the magnitude of density dependence. Here, we evaluated the potential impact of season and habitat (characterized by sediment grain size and seagrass biomass) on the magnitude of density dependence in shell growth of 3 infaunal bivalve species dominating the tropical intertidal benthic communities of Banc d’Arguin, Mauritania. Two of our focal species were filter feeders (Senilia senilis and Pelecyora isocardia) and one was a facultative mixotroph (Loripes orbiculatus), mainly relying on organic carbon provided by sulphide-oxidizing endosymbiotic gill-bacteria (i.e. chemosymbiotic). Distinguishing 2 seasons, winter and summer, we manipulated local bivalve densities across habitats (from bare sandy sediments to seagrass-covered mud). In situ growth of individually tagged and relocated clams was measured and compared with those of tagged clams that were allocated to adjacent sites where local bivalve densities were doubled. Growth was negatively density-dependent in both winter and summer in P. isocardia and L. orbiculatus, the 2 species that mainly inhabit seagrass sediments, but not in S. senilis, usually found in bare sediments. As reproduction and survival rates are generally size-dependent in bivalves, our results suggest that in our tropical study system, the bivalve community of seagrass-covered sediments is more strongly regulated than that of adjacent bare sediments, regardless of species-specific feeding mode or season. We suggest that ecosystem engineering by seagrasses enhances environmental stability, which allows bivalve populations within tropical seagrass beds to stay close to carrying capacity.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630, 1616-1599 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2488  
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Auteur Mariani, P.; Křivan, V.; MacKenzie, B.R.; Mullon, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre The migration game in habitat network: the case of tuna Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Theor Ecol  
  Volume 9 Numéro 2 Pages 219-232  
  Mots-Clés Bluefin tuna; Game theory; Habitat selection; Ideal free distribution; Plant Sciences; Structured population; Theoretical Ecology/Statistics; Zoology  
  Résumé Long-distance migration is a widespread process evolved independently in several animal groups in terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Many factors contribute to the migration process and of primary importance are intra-specific competition and seasonality in the resource distribution. Adaptive migration in direction of increasing fitness should lead to the ideal free distribution (IFD) which is the evolutionary stable strategy of the habitat selection game. We introduce a migration game which focuses on migrating dynamics leading to the IFD for age-structured populations and in time varying habitats, where dispersal is costly. The model predicts migration dynamics between these habitats and the corresponding population distribution. When applied to Atlantic bluefin tunas, it predicts their migration routes and their seasonal distribution. The largest biomass is located in the spawning areas which have also the largest diversity in the age-structure. Distant feeding areas are occupied on a seasonal base and often by larger individuals, in agreement with empirical observations. Moreover, we show that only a selected number of migratory routes emerge as those effectively used by tunas.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1874-1738, 1874-1746 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1465  
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Auteur Virgili, A.; Authier, M.; Boisseau, O.; Cañadas, A.; Claridge, D.; Cole, T.; Corkeron, P.; Dorémus, G.; David, L.; Di‐Méglio, N.; Dunn, C.; Dunn, T.E.; García‐Barón, I.; Laran, S.; Lauriano, G.; Lewis, M.; Louzao, M.; Mannocci, L.; Martínez‐Cedeira, J.; Palka, D.; Panigada, S.; Pettex, E.; Roberts, J.J.; Ruiz, L.; Saavedra, C.; Santos, M.B.; Canneyt, O.V.; Bonales, J.A.V.; Monestiez, P.; Ridoux, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Combining multiple visual surveys to model the habitat of deep-diving cetaceans at the basin scale Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography  
  Volume 28 Numéro 3 Pages 300-314  
  Mots-Clés beaked whales; data-assembling; deep-diving cetaceans; habitat modelling; kogiids; sperm whales  
  Résumé Aim Deep-diving cetaceans are oceanic species exposed to multiple anthropogenic pressures including high intensity underwater noise, and knowledge of their distribution is crucial to manage their conservation. Due to intrinsic low densities, wide distribution ranges and limited presence at the sea surface, these species are rarely sighted. Pooling data from multiple visual surveys sharing a common line-transect methodology can increase sightings but requires accounting for heterogeneity in protocols and platforms. Location North Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. Time period 1998 to 2015. Major taxa Ziphiidae; Physeteriidae; Kogiidae. Methods About 1,240,000 km of pooled effort provided 630 sightings of ziphiids, 836 of physeteriids and 106 of kogiids. For each taxon, we built a hierarchical model to estimate the effective strip width depending on observation conditions and survey types. We then modelled relative densities in a generalized additive modelling framework. Geographical predictions were limited to interpolations identified with a gap analysis of environmental space coverage. Results Deeper areas of the North Atlantic gyre were mostly environmental extrapolation in the predictions, thereby highlighting gaps in sampling across the different surveys. For the three species groups, the highest relative densities were predicted along continental slopes, particularly in the western North Atlantic Ocean where the Gulf Stream creates dynamic frontal zones and eddies. Main conclusions Pooling a large number of surveys provided the first basin-wide models of distribution for deep-diving cetaceans, including several data-deficient taxa, across the North Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. These models can help the conservation of elusive and poorly known marine megafauna.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2756  
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