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Auteur Arrizabalaga, H.; Dufour, F.; Kell, L.; Merino, G.; Ibaibarriaga, L.; Chust, G.; Irigoien, X.; Santiago, J.; Murua, H.; Fraile, I.; Chifflet, M.; Goikoetxea, N.; Sagarminaga, Y.; Aumont, O.; Bopp, L.; Herrera, M.; FROMENTIN, J.-M.; Bonhomeau, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Global habitat preferences of commercially valuable tuna Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 113 Numéro Pages (down) 102-112  
  Mots-Clés Habitat; Tuna fisheries; Catch/ effort; Environmental conditions; Quotient analysis; Generalized Additive Models; Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management  
  Résumé In spite of its pivotal role in future implementations of the Ecosystem Approach to Fisheries Management, current knowledge about tuna habitat preferences remains fragmented and heterogeneous, because it relies mainly on regional or local studies that have used a variety of approaches making them difficult to combine. Therefore in this study we analyse data from six tuna species in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans in order to provide a global, comparative perspective of habitat preferences. These data are longline catch per unit effort from 1958 to2007 for albacore, Atlantic bluefin, southern bluefin, bigeye, yellowfin and skipjack tunas. Both quotient analysis and Generalized Additive Models were used to determine habitat preference with respect to eight biotic and abiotic variables. Results confirmed that, compared to temperate tunas, tropical tunas prefer warm, anoxic, stratified waters. Atlantic and southern bluefin tuna prefer higher concentrations of chlorophyll than the rest. The two species also tolerate most extreme sea surface height anomalies and highest mixed layer depths. In general, Atlantic bluefin tuna tolerates the widest range of environmental conditions. An assessment of the most important variables determining fish habitat is also provided.  
  Adresse Ifremer, UMR 212 EME, boulevard Jean Monnet, BP 171, Sete Cedex, 34203, France  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Elsevier BV Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ 31190 collection 981  
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Auteur Giannoulaki, M.; Iglesias, M.; Tugores, M.P.; Bonanno, A.; Patti, B.; Felice, A.D.; Leonori, I.; BIGOT, J.-L.; Ticina, V.; Pyrounaki, M.M.; Tsagarakis, K.; Machias, A.; Somarakis, S.; Schismenou, E.; Quinci, E.; Basilone, G.; Cuttitta, A.; Campanella, F.; Miquel, J.; Onate, D.; ROOS, D.; Valavanis, V. url  openurl
  Titre Characterizing the potential habitat of European anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus in the Mediterranean Sea, at different life stages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Fisheries Oceanography  
  Volume 22 Numéro 2 Pages (down) 69-89  
  Mots-Clés anchovy; anchovy potential nurseries; habitat suitability modelling; Mediterranean sea; small pelagics  
  Résumé Identification of the potential habitat of European anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) at different life stages in relation to environmental conditions is an interesting subject from both ecological and management points of view. For this purpose, acoustic data from different seasons and different parts of the Mediterranean Sea along with satellite environmental and bathymetry data were modelled using generalized additive models. Similarly, egg distribution data from summer ichthyoplankton surveys were used to model potential spawning habitat. Selected models were used to produce maps presenting the probability of anchovy presence (adults, juveniles and eggs) in the entire Mediterranean basin, as a measure of habitat adequacy. Bottom depth and sea surface chlorophyll concentration were the variables found important in all models. Potential anchovy habitats were located over the continental shelf for all life stages examined. An expansion of the potential habitat from the peak spawning (early summer) to the late spawning season (early autumn) was observed. However, the most suitable areas for the presence of anchovy spawners seem to maintain the same size between seasons. Potential juvenile habitats were associated with highly productive inshore waters, being less extended and closer to coast during winter than late autumn. Potential spawning habitat in June and July based on ichthyoplankton surveys overlapped but were wider in extent compared with adult potential habitat from acoustics in the same season. Similarities and dissimilarities between the anchovy habitats as well as comparisons with sardine habitats in the oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea and other ecosystems with higher productivity are discussed.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1054-6006 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 240  
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Auteur Gutowsky, S.E.; Tremblay, Y.; Kappes, M.A.; Flint, E.N.; Klavitter, J.; Laniawe, L.; Costa, D.P.; Naughton, M.B.; Romano, M.D.; Shaffer, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Divergent post-breeding distribution and habitat associations of fledgling and adult black-footed Albatrosses Phoebastria nigripes in the North Pacific Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ibis  
  Volume 156 Numéro 1 Pages (down) 60-72  
  Mots-Clés dispersal; geolocators; habitat use; Juvenile; Procellariiform; satellite telemetry; seabird  
  Résumé Past tracking studies of marine animals have primarily targeted adults, biasing our understanding of at-sea habitat use toward older life stages. Anthropogenic threats persist throughout the at-sea ranges of all life stages and it is therefore of interest to population ecologists and managers alike to understand spatiotemporal distributions and possible niche differentiation between age-classes. In albatrosses, particularly little is known about the juvenile life stage when fledglings depart the colonies and venture to sea with no prior experience or parental guidance. We compared the dispersal of 22 fledgling Black-footed Albatross Phoebastria nigripes between 2006 and 2008 using satellite telemetry and 16 adults between 2008 and 2009 using geolocaters from Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, Northwest Hawaiian Islands. Following tag deployment, all fledglings spent several days within the calm atoll waters, then travelled northward until reaching 750-900km from the colony. At this point, fledgling distributions approached the productive North Pacific Transition Zone (NPTZ). Rather than reaching the high chlorophyll a densities on the leading edge of this zone, however, fledglings remained in areas of low productivity in the subtropical gyre. In contrast, adult albatrosses from the same breeding colony did not utilize the NPTZ at this time of year but rather ranged throughout the highly productive northern periphery of the Pacific Ocean Basin among the shelf regions off Japan and the Aleutian Islands. The dichotomy in habitat use between fledglings and adults from Midway Atoll results in complete spatial segregation between age-classes and suggests ontogenetic niche separation in this species. This research fills a large knowledge gap in at-sea habitat use during a little known yet critical life stage of albatrosses, and contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of differential mortality pressure between age-classes and overall conservation status for the vulnerable Black-footed Albatross.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0019-1019 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 329  
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Auteur Trape, S.; Durand, J.-D.; Vigliola, L.; Panfili, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Recruitment success and growth variability of mugilids in a West African estuary impacted by climate change Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science  
  Volume 198 Numéro Pages (down) 53-62  
  Mots-Clés Habitat quality; Hypersaline conditions; Inverse estuary; Juveniles; Mugilidae; West Africa  
  Résumé With the persistence of a drought since the late 1960s, some West African estuaries became permanently reversed in term of salinity gradient and hypersaline waters are present in their upstream part (salinity >60). To understand the mechanisms regulating fish recruitment intensity in these estuaries and evaluate the consequences of freshwater shortages on juvenile habitat quality, a growth study was conducted in the Saloum hypersaline estuary (Senegal). The Mugilidae fish family, highly representative of estuarine environments, was targeted and several species sampled (Chelon dumerili, Mugil bananensis and M. cf. curema sp. M). Juveniles were sampled monthly all the year round in three areas of the estuary exhibiting strongly contrasted habitat conditions. Otolith sections were used to estimate the ages, reconstruct growth trajectories, estimate the duration of the oceanic larval phase, and evaluate juvenile growth variability along the salinity gradient. Analyses revealed that the temporal recruitment variability of C. dumerili, with 2 annual cohorts, was not mainly induced by growth-selection mechanisms, but probably more by predation pressures. Juveniles exhibited significantly faster growth rates in the lower salinity suggesting that benthic food availability was a strong factor controlling habitat quality of early juveniles. Salinity had also a clear impact when reducing the growth in hypersaline conditions and/or selecting slower growing individuals. Moderate freshwater inputs positively affected the nursery function of the estuary for mugilids by enhancing the productivity of the first trophic levels. In a long term, the global change could have an impact of the mugilid fishery and its management.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2185  
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Auteur van der Geest, M.; van der Lely, J.A.C.; van Gils, J.A.; Piersma, T.; Lok, T. doi  openurl
  Titre Density-dependent growth of bivalves dominating the intertidal zone of Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania: importance of feeding mode, habitat and season Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 610 Numéro Pages (down) 51-63  
  Mots-Clés biomass; Carrying capacity; Chemosymbiosis; competition; Density dependence; dynamics; ecosystem; Environmental heterogeneity; Feeding guild; flats; populations; seagrass; Seagrass; sediment; site; Soft-sediment habitat; variability  
  Résumé Accurate predictions of population dynamics require an understanding of the ways by which environmental conditions and species-specific traits affect the magnitude of density dependence. Here, we evaluated the potential impact of season and habitat (characterized by sediment grain size and seagrass biomass) on the magnitude of density dependence in shell growth of 3 infaunal bivalve species dominating the tropical intertidal benthic communities of Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania. Two of our focal species were filter feeders (Senilia senilis and Pelecyora isocardia) and one was a facultative mixotroph (Loripes orbiculatus), mainly relying on organic carbon provided by sulphide-oxidizing endosymbiotic gill-bacteria (i.e. chemosymbiotic). Distinguishing 2 seasons, winter and summer, we manipulated local bivalve densities across habitats (from bare sandy sediments to seagrass-covered mud). In situ growth of individually tagged and relocated clams was measured and compared with those of tagged clams that were allocated to adjacent sites where local bivalve densities were doubled. Growth was negatively density-dependent in both winter and summer in P. isocardia and L. orbiculatus, the 2 species that mainly inhabit seagrass sediments, but not in S. senilis, usually found in bare sediments. As reproduction and survival rates are generally size-dependent in bivalves, our results suggest that in our tropical study system, the bivalve community of seagrass-covered sediments is more strongly regulated than that of adjacent bare sediments, regardless of species-specific feeding mode or season. We suggest that ecosystem engineering by seagrasses enhances environmental stability, which allows bivalve populations within tropical seagrass beds to stay close to carrying capacity.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2593  
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