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Auteur Gaboriau, T.; Albouy, C.; Descombes, P.; Mouillot, D.; Pellissier, L.; Leprieur, F. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecological constraints coupled with deep-time habitat dynamics predict the latitudinal diversity gradient in reef fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume 286 Numéro 1911 Pages 20191506  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate; diversification; environmental-changes; global patterns; latitudinal diversity gradient; mechanistic model; niche conservatism; palaeohabitat; plate-tectonics; rates; reef fish; relative roles; species richness  
  Résumé We develop a spatially explicit model of diversification based on palaeohabitat to explore the predictions of four major hypotheses potentially explaining the latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG), namely, the 'time-area', 'tropical niche conservatism', 'ecological limits' and 'evolutionary speed' livpotheses. We compare simulation outputs to observed diversity gradients in the global reef fish fauna. Our simulations show that these hypotheses are nonmutually exclusive and that their relative influence depends on the time scale considered. Simulations suggest that reef habitat dynamics produced the LDG during deep geological time, while ecological constraints shaped the modern LDG, with a strong influence of the reduction in the latitudinal extent of tropical reefs during the Neogene. Overall, this study illustrates how mechanistic models in ecology and evolution can provide a temporal and spatial understanding of the role of speciation, extinction and dispersal in generating biodiversity patterns.  
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  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000486417800008 Approuvé (up) pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2650  
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Auteur Carpentier, A.S.; Berthe, C.; Ender, I.; Jaine, F.R.A.; Mourier, J.; Stevens, G.; De Rosemont, M.; Clua, E. doi  openurl
  Titre Preliminary insights into the population characteristics and distribution of reef (Mobula alfredi) and oceanic (M. birostris) manta rays in French Polynesia Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Coral Reefs  
  Volume 38 Numéro 6 Pages 1197-1210  
  Mots-Clés aggregation; australia; bottle-nosed dolphins; california; Citizen science; conservation; Ecotourism management; habitat use; identification; marine park; movements; sharks; Site fidelity; Spatial connectivity; Sympatry  
  Résumé In French Polynesia, both currently recognized manta ray species, Mobula alfredi and M. birostris, are observed. Despite being an important cultural asset and generating significant economic benefits through manta ray watching tourism, published data on the ecology and threats to these species in the region are scarce. Based on an 18-year dataset of sighting records collected by citizen scientists and during two scientific expeditions, this study provides the first insights into the population characteristics and regional distribution of the two manta ray species in French Polynesia. A total of 1347 manta ray photographs (1337 for M. alfredi and 10 for M. birostris) were examined for the period January 2001-December 2017, with photo-identification techniques leading to the successful identification of 317 individual M. alfredi and 10 individual M. birostris throughout the Society, Tuamotu and Marquesas Islands. We provide the first confirmation of sympatric distribution of both species in the Society Islands. Our results highlight strong and long-term site fidelity of M. alfredi individuals to certain aggregation sites (> 9 years for 16 individuals) and reveal some degree of connectivity between populations, with 10 individuals recorded moving between islands located up to 50 km apart. Analysis of photographs of individuals bearing sub-lethal injuries (n = 68) suggests that M. alfredi are more likely to be injured at inhabited islands (Maupiti or Bora Bora; 75% of all injured individuals) than at uninhabited islands, with 75% of injuries related to boat propeller strikes and fishing gear entanglements. Our findings emphasize the need for further research to allow for a comprehensive evaluation of population structure, size and threats to manta rays in this region.  
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  ISSN 0722-4028 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000496024100010 Approuvé (up) pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2658  
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Auteur Darling, E.S.; Graham, N.A.J.; Januchowski-Hartley, F.A.; Nash, K.L.; Pratchett, M.S.; Wilson, S.K. doi  openurl
  Titre Relationships between structural complexity, coral traits, and reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Coral Reefs  
  Volume 36 Numéro 2 Pages 561-575  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; community; coral reef fish; diversity; ecosystems; fisheries; functional ecology; Habitat complexity; Habitat diversity; life; marine reserves; ocean acidification; Reef architecture; scleractinian corals; species traits; vulnerability  
  Résumé With the ongoing loss of coral cover and the associated flattening of reef architecture, understanding the links between coral habitat and reef fishes is of critical importance. Here, we investigate whether considering coral traits and functional diversity provides new insights into the relationship between structural complexity and reef fish communities, and whether coral traits and community composition can predict structural complexity. Across 157 sites in Seychelles, Maldives, the Chagos Archipelago, and Australia's Great Barrier Reef, we find that structural complexity and reef zone are the strongest and most consistent predictors of reef fish abundance, biomass, species richness, and trophic structure. However, coral traits, diversity, and life histories provided additional predictive power for models of reef fish assemblages, and were key drivers of structural complexity. Our findings highlight that reef complexity relies on living corals-with different traits and life histories-continuing to build carbonate skeletons, and that these nuanced relationships between coral assemblages and habitat complexity can affect the structure of reef fish assemblages. Seascape-level estimates of structural complexity are rapid and cost effective with important implications for the structure and function of fish assemblages, and should be incorporated into monitoring programs.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4028 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2150  
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Auteur van Gils, J.A.; van der Geest, M.; De Meulenaer, B.; Gillis, H.; Piersma, T.; Folmer, E.O. url  doi
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  Titre Moving on with foraging theory: incorporating movement decisions into the functional response of a gregarious shorebird Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Animal Ecology  
  Volume 84 Numéro Pages 554-564  
  Mots-Clés competition continuous-time Markov chain cryptic interference diet distribution habitat choice intake rate movement ecology predation toxic prey SPATIAL-DISTRIBUTION RED KNOTS MODELING INTERFERENCE CRYPTIC INTERFERENCE STOCHASTIC VERSION BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY MULTISTATE MODELS BANC-DARGUIN GROUP-SIZE PREY Ecology Zoology  
  Résumé 1. Models relating intake rate to food abundance and competitor density (generalized functional response models) can predict forager distributions and movements between patches, but we lack understanding of how distributions and small-scale movements by the foragers themselves affect intake rates. Using a state-of-the-art approach based on continuous-time Markov chain dynamics, we add realism to classic functional response models by acknowledging that the chances to encounter food and competitors are influenced by movement decisions, and, vice versa, that movement decisions are influenced by these encounters. We used a multi-state modelling framework to construct a stochastic functional response model in which foragers alternate between three behavioural states: searching, handling and moving. Using behavioural observations on a molluscivore migrant shorebird (red knot, Calidris canutus canutus), at its main wintering area (Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania), we estimated transition rates between foraging states as a function of conspecific densities and densities of the two main bivalve prey. Intake rate decreased with conspecific density. This interference effect was not due to decreased searching efficiency, but resulted from time lost to avoidance movements. Red knots showed a strong functional response to one prey (Dosinia isocardia), but a weak response to the other prey (Loripes lucinalis). This corroborates predictions from a recently developed optimal diet model that accounts for the mildly toxic effects due to consuming Loripes. Using model averaging across the most plausible multi-state models, the fully parameterized functional response model was then used to predict intake rate for an independent data set on habitat choice by red knot. Comparison of the sites selected by red knots with random sampling sites showed that the birds fed at sites with higher than average Loripes and Dosinia densities, that is sites for which we predicted higher than average intake rates. We discuss the limitations of Holling's classic functional response model which ignores movement and the limitations of contemporary movement ecological theory that ignores consumer-resource interactions. With the rapid advancement of technologies to track movements of individual foragers at fine spatial scales, the time is ripe to integrate descriptive tracking studies with stochastic movement-based functional response models.  
  Adresse [van Gils, Jan A.; van der Geest, Matthijs; De Meulenaer, Brecht; Gillis, Hanneke; Piersma, Theunis; Folmer, Eelke O.] NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. [van der Geest, Matthijs; Piersma, Theunis] Univ Groningen, Anim Ecol Grp, Ctr Ecol & Evolutionary Studies CEES, Chair Global Flyway Ecol, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. van Gils, JA (reprint author), NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, POB 59, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. Jan.van.Gils@nioz.nl  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes ISI Document Delivery No.: CB9RB Times Cited: 0 Cited Reference Count: 61 van Gils, Jan A. van der Geest, Matthijs De Meulenaer, Brecht Gillis, Hanneke Piersma, Theunis Folmer, Eelke O. NWO WOTRO [W.01.65.221.00]; NWO [R 84-639]; NWO VIDI [864.09.002] We thank Parc National du Banc d'Arguin (PNBA) for their hospitality, the hosting of our presence and the permission to work in and from the Iwik scientific station. Lemhaba ould Yarba made the logistic arrangements. Joop van Eerbeek, Erik J. Jansen, Han Olff and El-Hacen Mohamed El-Hacen helped collecting and sorting benthos samples. Valuable comments on the manuscript were given by Allert Bijleveld, Jaap van der Meer, Ola Olsson, Thomas Oudman, Isabel M. Smallegange, an anonymous referee and by the 'literature club' of the Centre for Integrative Ecology during JAvG's sabbatical at Deakin University. Dick Visser polished the figures. This work is supported by an NWO WOTRO Integrated Programme grant (W.01.65.221.00) to TP, an NWO travel grant (R 84-639) to EOF, and an NWO VIDI grant (864.09.002) to JAvG. 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL HOBOKEN J ANIM ECOL Approuvé (up) pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ 1412 collection 1383  
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Auteur van Gils, J.A.; van der Geest, M.; Jansen, E.J.; Govers, L.L.; de Fouw, J.; Piersma, T. url  openurl
  Titre Trophic cascade induced by molluscivore predator alters pore-water biogeochemistry via competitive release of prey Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology  
  Volume 93 Numéro Pages 1143-1152  
  Mots-Clés Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania bivalves (Dosinia isocardia, Loripes lucinalis) facilitation growth rate hydrogen sulfide interspecific competition predation predator-exclosure experiment Red Knot, Calidris canutus canutus seagrass beds top-down effect toxicity knots calidris-canutus food webs ecological consequences habitat communities coexistence depletion bivalvia sulfide diet  
  Résumé Effects of predation may cascade down the food web. By alleviating interspecific competition among prey, predators may promote biodiversity, but the precise mechanisms of how predators alter competition have remained elusive. Here we report on a predator-exclosure experiment carried out in a tropical intertidal ecosystem, providing evidence for a three-level trophic cascade induced by predation by molluscivore Red Knots (Calidris canutus) that affects pore water biogeochemistry. In the exclosures the knots' favorite prey (Dosinia isocardia) became dominant and reduced the individual growth rate in an alternative prey (Loripes lucinalis). Dosinia, a suspension feeder, consumes suspended particulate organic matter (POM), whereas Loripes is a facultative mixotroph, partly living on metabolites produced by sulfur-oxidizing chemoautotrophic bacteria, but also consuming suspended POM. Reduced sulfide concentrations in the exclosures suggest that, without predation on Dosinia, stronger competition for suspended POM forces Loripes to rely on energy produced by endosymbiotic bacteria, thus leading to an enhanced uptake of sulfide from the surrounding pore water. As sulfide is toxic to most organisms, this competition-induced diet shift by Loripes may detoxify the environment, which in turn may facilitate other species. The inference that predators affect the toxicity of their environment via a multi-level trophic cascade is novel, but we believe it may be a general phenomenon in detritus-based ecosystems.  
  Adresse [van Gils, Jan A.; van der Geest, Matthijs; Jansen, Erik J.; de Fouw, Jimmy; Piersma, Theunis] NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. [Govers, Laura L.] Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Fac Sci, Inst Water & Wetland Res, Dept Environm Sci, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen, Netherlands. [Piersma, Theunis] Univ Groningen, CEES, Anim Ecol Grp, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. van der Geest, M (reprint author), NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, POB 59, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands matthijs.van.der.geest@nioz.nl  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes ISI Document Delivery No.: 946QK Times Cited: 0 Cited Reference Count: 60 van Gils, Jan A. van der Geest, Matthijs Jansen, Erik J. Govers, Laura L. de Fouw, Jimmy Piersma, Theunis Nwo-wotro[w.01.65.221.00] We are grateful to the staff of the Parc National du Banc d'Arguin for allowing us to work and stay in the area under their management. In 2009 we had the pleasant company of Tjisse van der Heide, Han Olff, and Erik Rosendaal, and in 2010 Brecht De Meulenaer joined us. Erik Rosendaal processed fecal samples, and Jeroen Onrust determined shell dry masses. Dick Visser redrew the figures. This work was funded by the NWO-WOTRO Integrated Programme grant W.01.65.221.00 awarded to T. Piersma. Ecological soc amer Washington Approuvé (up) pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ 722 collection 1384  
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