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Auteur Batsleer, J.; Marchal, P.; Vaz, S.; Vermard, V.; Rijnsdorp, A.D.; Poos, J.J. doi  openurl
  Titre Exploring habitat credits to manage the benthic impact in a mixed fishery Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 586 Numéro Pages 167-179  
  Mots-Clés growth; sea; reserves; marine protected areas; juvenile; Plaice; Eastern English Channel; Fleet dynamics; vms data; fishing disturbance; central english-channel; Cod; costs; Dynamic state variable modelling; georges bank; Mixed fisheries; tac; Total allowable catch  
  Résumé The performance of a combined catch quota and habitat credit system was explored to manage the sustainable exploitation of a mix of demersal fish species and reduce the benthic impacts of bottom trawl fisheries using a dynamic state variable model approach. The model was parameterised for the Eastern English Channel demersal mixed fishery using otter trawls or dredges. Target species differed in their association with habitat types. Restricting catch quota for plaice and cod had a limited effect on benthic impact, except when reduced to very low values, forcing the vessels to stay in port. Quota management had a minimal influence on fishing behaviour and hence resulted in a minimal reduction of benthic impact. Habitat credits may reduce the benthic impacts of the trawl fisheries at a minimal loss of landings and revenue, as vessels are still able to reallocate their effort to less vulnerable fishing grounds, while allowing the fishery to catch their catch quota and maintain their revenue. Only if they are reduced to extremely low levels can habitat credits potentially constrain fishing activities to levels that prevent the fisheries from using up the catch quota for the target species.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2283  
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Auteur BRIND'AMOUR, A.; LAFFARGUE, P.; MORIN, J.; VAZ, S.; FOVEAU, A.; LE BRIS, H. url  openurl
  Titre Morphospecies and taxonomic sufficiency of benthic megafauna in scientific bottom trawl surveys Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Continental Shelf Research  
  Volume 72 Numéro Pages 1-9  
  Mots-Clés Bay of Biscay; Benthic descriptor; Bottom trawl surveys; English Channel; North sea; Taxonomic sufficiency  
  Résumé Scientific fisheries surveys routinely identify a large diversity of commercial and non-commercial benthic megainvertebrates that could provide useful information for Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) descriptors. Species is obviously the basic taxonomic level to which most ecological studies and theories refer. Identification at this level of organization is indeed always preferred over any other taxonomic level. Nevertheless, aggregation of species to higher taxonomic levels may be unavoidable sometimes, since errors of identification are known or suspected to occur in many surveys. Using analyses of taxonomic sufficiency (identification of organisms at various taxonomic resolutions) and groups of morphospecies (taxa identified easily by non-experts on the basis of evident morphological traits), this study aims to quantify the loss of ecological information incurred by partial identification of benthic megafauna in bottom trawl surveys in order to put such data to good use. The analyses were conducted on five scientific surveys representing a large range of geographical areas (from 150 km2 to 150 000 km2) and environmental conditions. Results show that genus, family and, particularly, morphospecies are good surrogates for species identification in community analyses. We suggest that bottom trawl surveys can provide reliable megafauna data that may usefully complete those obtained by grab surveys. The use of morphospecies could lead to new strategies, combining different datasets to provide indicators for MSFD descriptors (e.g. D6).  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0278-4343 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1141  
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Auteur McLean, M.; Auber, A.; Graham, N.A.J.; Houk, P.; Villeger, S.; Violle, C.; Thuiller, W.; Wilson, S.K.; Mouillot, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Trait structure and redundancy determine sensitivity to disturbance in marine fish communities Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.  
  Volume 25 Numéro 10 Pages 3424-3437  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate change; climate-change; coral reefs; coral-reef fish; diversity stability; ecological traits; ecosystem functioning; ecosystem productivity; egg buoyancy; English Channel; functional diversity; functional redundancy; north-sea; regime shifts; response diversity; vulnerability  
  Résumé Trait diversity is believed to influence ecosystem dynamics through links between organismal traits and ecosystem processes. Theory predicts that key traits and high trait redundancy-large species richness and abundance supporting the same traits-can buffer communities against environmental disturbances. While experiments and data from simple ecological systems lend support, large-scale evidence from diverse, natural systems under major disturbance is lacking. Here, using long-term data from both temperate (English Channel) and tropical (Seychelles Islands) fishes, we show that sensitivity to disturbance depends on communities' initial trait structure and initial trait redundancy. In both ecosystems, we found that increasing dominance by climatically vulnerable traits (e.g., small, fast-growing pelagics/corallivores) rendered fish communities more sensitive to environmental change, while communities with higher trait redundancy were more resistant. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the influence of trait structure and redundancy on community sensitivity over large temporal and spatial scales in natural systems. Our results exemplify a consistent link between biological structure and community sensitivity that may be transferable across ecosystems and taxa and could help anticipate future disturbance impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000486150200018 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2652  
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Auteur McLean, M.J.; Mouillot, D.; Goascoz, N.; Schlaich, I.; Auber, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Functional reorganization of marine fish nurseries under climate warming Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.  
  Volume 25 Numéro 2 Pages 660-674  
  Mots-Clés English Channel; community; ecosystem; fisheries; recruitment; functional traits; in-situ; connectivity; estuarine; climate change; life-history strategies; ecosystem function; life history; english-channel; Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation; atlantic multidecadal oscillation; fuzzy-logic; r-selection  
  Résumé While climate change is rapidly impacting marine species and ecosystems worldwide, the effects of climate warming on coastal fish nurseries have received little attention despite nurseries' fundamental roles in recruitment and population replenishment. Here, we used a 26-year time series (1987-2012) of fish monitoring in the Bay of Somme, a nursery in the Eastern English Channel (EEC), to examine the impacts of environmental and human drivers on the spatial and temporal dynamics of fish functional structure during a warming phase of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). We found that the nursery was initially dominated by fishes with r-selected life-history traits such as low trophic level, low age and size at maturity, and small offspring, which are highly sensitive to warming. The AMO, likely superimposed on climate change, induced rapid warming in the late 1990s (over 1 degrees C from 1998 to 2003), leading to functional reorganization of fish communities, with a roughly 80% decline in overall fish abundance and increased dominance by K-selected fishes. Additionally, historical overfishing likely rendered the bay more vulnerable to climatic changes due to increased dominance by fishing-tolerant, yet climatically sensitive species. The drop in fish abundance not only altered fish functional structure within the Bay of Somme, but the EEC was likely impacted, as the EEC has been unable to recover from a regime shift in the late 1990s potentially, in part, due to failed replenishment from the bay. Given the collapse of r-selected fishes, we discuss how the combination of climate cycles and global warming could threaten marine fish nurseries worldwide, as nurseries are often dominated by r-selected species.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2523  
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