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Auteur (up) Baidai, Y.; Dagorn, L.; Amande, M.J.; Gaertner, D.; Capello, M.
Titre Machine learning for characterizing tropical tuna aggregations under Drifting Fish Aggregating Devices (DFADs) from commercial echosounder buoys data Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish Res.
Volume 229 Numéro Pages 105613
Mots-Clés behavior; classification; communities; Direct abundance indicator; echo-sounder buoys; Echosounder buoys; estimate biomass; fads; Fish aggregating devices; Purse seiner; purse seiners; target strength; temperature; Tropical tunas; yellowfin thunnus-albacares
Résumé The use of echosounder buoys deployed in conjunction with Drifting Fish Aggregating Devices (DFADs) has progressively increased in the tropical tuna purse seine fishery since 2010 as a means of improving fishing efficiency. Given the broad distribution of DFADs, the acoustic data provided by echosounder buoys can provide an alternative to the conventional CPUE index for deriving trends on tropical tuna stocks. This study aims to derive reliable indices of presence of tunas (and abundance) using echosounder buoy data. A novel methodology is presented which utilizes random forest classification to translate the acoustic backscatter from the buoys into metrics of tuna presence and abundance. Training datasets were constructed by cross-referencing acoustic data with logbook and observer data which reported activities on DFADs (tuna catches, new deployments and visits of DFADs) in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans from 2013 to 2018. The analysis showed accuracies of 75 and 85 % for the recognition of the presence/absence of tuna aggregations under DFADs in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, respectively. The acoustic data recorded at ocean-specific depths (6-45m in the Atlantic and 30-150m in the Indian Ocean) and periods (4 a.m.-4 p.m.) were identified by the algorithm as the most important explanatory variables for detecting the presence of tuna. The classification of size categories of tuna aggregations showed a global accuracy of nearly 50 % for both oceans. This study constitutes a milestone towards the use of echosounder buoys data for scientific purposes, including the development of promising fisheries-independent indices of abundance for tropical tunas.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000539099200018 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2816
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Auteur (up) Lopez, J.; Moreno, G.; Lennert-Cody, C.; Maunder, M.; Sancristobal, I.; Caballero, A.; Dagorn, L.
Titre Environmental preferences of tuna and non-tuna species associated with drifting fish aggregating devices (DFADs) in the Atlantic Ocean, ascertained through fishers' echo-sounder buoys Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume 140 Numéro Pages 127-138
Mots-Clés behavior; catch rates; Echo-sounder buoy; Environmental preferences; equatorial atlantic; fad; floating objects; french-polynesia; gamm; habitat; pacific-ocean; Pelagic fish; Purse seine; thunnus-albacares; Tropical tuna; Tuna; western indian-ocean
Résumé Understanding the relationship between environmental variables and pelagic species concentrations and dynamics is helpful to improve fishery management, especially in a changing environment. Drifting fish aggregating device (DFAD)-associated tuna and non-tuna biomass data from the fishers' echo-sounder buoys operating in the Atlantic Ocean have been modelled as functions of oceanographic (Sea Surface Temperature, Chlorophyll-a, Salinity, Sea Level Anomaly, Thermocline depth and gradient, Geostrophic current, Total Current, Depth) and DFAD variables (DFAD speed, bearing and soak time) using Generalized Additive Mixed Models (GAMMs). Biological interaction (presence of non-tuna species at DFADs) was also included in the tuna model, and found to be significant at this time scale. All variables were included in the analyses but only some of them were highly significant, and variable significance differed among fish groups. In general, most of the fish biomass distribution was explained by the ocean productivity and DFAD-variables. Indeed, this study revealed different environmental preferences for tunas and non-tuna species and suggested the existence of active habitat selection. This improved assessment of environmental and DFAD effects on tuna and non-tuna catchability in the purse seine tuna fishery will contribute to transfer of better scientific advice to regional tuna commissions for the management and conservation of exploited resources.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2177
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Auteur (up) Moreno, G.; Dagorn, L.; Capello, M.; Lopez, J.; Filmalter, T.; Forget, F.; Sancristobal, I.; Holland, K.
Titre Fish aggregating devices (FADs) as scientific platforms Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish Res.
Volume 178 Numéro Pages 122-129
Mots-Clés abundance; Acoustic tags; association; behavior; Echo-sounder buoy; fad; Fishing technology; indian-ocean; pacific-ocean; Pelagic ecosystem; pelagic fish; purse-seine fisheries; thunnus-albacares; Tropical tuna; Tuna; western; yellowfin
Résumé Fish aggregating devices (FADs) are floating objects used by fishers to aggregate pelagic fish such as tunas, and enhance the catch of these species. Because this is so important for tuna fisheries, nearly 100,000 FADs are deployed by fishers every year in the world's tropical oceans. Fishers use geo-locating buoys to track and maintain these FADs by visiting them regularly, reinforcing them if they are weak or replacing them. Many of these buoys are now equipped with echo-sounders in order to provide remote information on the aggregated biomass. FADs are currently only used for fishing purposes but they can also serve scientific objectives. In this paper, we investigate the potential of these data for improving our knowledge on the ecology of tunas and other pelagic animals as well as to obtain fishery-independent indices of distribution and abundance. These FADs also represent platforms for scientists to deploy scientific instruments, such as electronic tag receivers, cameras and hydrophones. Because FADs naturally aggregate several pelagic species other than tuna, these instrumented FADs can be a unique opportunity to observe pelagic ecosystem dynamics that are not possible from conventional research vessels. The amount of cost-effective data that they can provide would make a significant contribution to the scientific understanding of pelagic ecosystems. This information is vital for improved conservation and management of pelagic fisheries. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0165-7836 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1650
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